Target practace
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Thread: Target practace

  1. Target practace

    I would like to know how many yards I should do? if more then one is one better then another?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tampa Bay Area
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    1,854
    I normally practice as close as 10' out to 25 yards. I'll normally practice my "defensive" shooting at 10' and 15' starting at a low ready. I think statistic show most encounters happen in this 7 to 15 foot distance. Then I'll move it out and 25' or 35' finishing off at 25 yards. I also will shot one handed and two handed both righty and lefty.
    "When Government fears the people, it's liberty. When people fear the Government, it's tyranny."
    - Benjamin Franklin

  4. #3
    I've also heard that most cases end up between 7 and 15 feet. but might as well practice a little further while you're at it cause you never know.
    You can have my freedom as soon as I'm done with it!!!

  5. #4
    I like to start at the longer distances to get my focus going, And work inward to shorter distances taking less time for target acquisition and shot thereby getting my ever older reflexes working.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by 65rambler View Post
    I would like to know how many yards I should do? if more then one is one better then another?
    I'd encourage employing sound fundamentals (sights/trigger) in a slow-fire fashion from 15-25 yards. Unless you're actively under fire from a long gun, pistol shots at greater than 25 meters would mean you likely have other options.

    Then, as you move closer toward the target, say at 10-12 meters, develop double and triple taps drawing from the holster (if your range permits - otherwise find a new range!). Off hand and one hand shooting at 10 meters too. This is where you begin to hone your "smooth quickness" from the holster to scoring hits on target. This distance is a great "yard line" to race yourself with smooth, efficient magazine transitions too. Push yourself to improve, execute more quickly, and put more scored/timed shots on target.

    Then keep moving forward. Essentially, the closer you get to your target(s), the quicker you're operating - and you may or may not even realize you're using your front sight less and less when you up to 3-5 meters. Instinctive snap-shooting, shooting while moving, and shooting multiple targets up to and within 5 meters - all from the holster, so you're actually training the way you'd fight - is great way to determine where your CC handgun skills really are. Don't hope you're ready, or even think you're ready. KNOW you are ready and refer to your own training log to track your own progress. (Times, scores etc.)

    Sight shooting at 25 meters is cool, and a great way to maintain fundamental proficiency.If you're training for a match, I'm all for spending time at 25m. Otherwise, lots of training with snap-shooting "up close and personal" where most handgun encounters occur is a great way to train to win and live.

    Lastly, before you head to the range, set some training goals for yourself. Show up with a plan to actually work on and improve certain aspects of your shooting skills, and track your progress. Push yourself if you attain your goals too easily, and readjust if they're unattainable. If you know you need more time drawing and presenting more quickly, race yourself. A buddy with a stopwatch is an effective and safe "stress inducer" that can push you to improve. Scoring rapidly delivered double & triple taps with points and time is a great way to force you to stay sharp, focused and continually developing your skill (and confidence).

    Don't just go plinking. Train, and then don't just train. Train the way you fight - and fight to win and live.

    IMHO.
    "There is no consitutional right to be protected by the state against being murdered by criminals or madmen." (7th Cir. 1982, Bowers v. DeVito)Stay safe, and stay trained.www.sazsatt.com

  7. thanks everyone. I never realy know how far out it should be.

  8. #7
    Get on the tractor,hook up the bushhog,carry ur favorite sidearm,find a piece of ground with tall grass and commence bushhogging. The big field rats will run out from in front of the tractor,clutch the tractor,shoot rats. Practice is great,moving targets,fast,target acquistion,sight alignment,trigger control,various distances. My fav rat gun is a 6" 357 magnum. probably doesnt help you any but its fun,and it breaks up the monotony of riding a tractor. Practice wherever and whenever you can!

  9. #8
    Never practiced on an outside range. We always go to an indoor range, because this is where the cops go to pratice and keep their marksmanship up.

    The cops are more than happy to help a person who wants to learn the correct way of handling and shooting a gun.

  10. #9
    I mostly practice from contact range out to 15 yards. I practice normal shooting stance( both left and right handed), one handed shooting with either hand, different shooting positions (including shooting from cover/concealment), shooting while moving, transitioning to my BUG and malfunction clearing drills. For contact distance (nose to nose) I practice palm strikes, stepping back and presenting.

    Then, for fun and marksmanship, I shoot at a 9" steel plate at 50 yards. I know I'll probably never have to engage with my pistol at this range, but it does wonders for my accuracy up closer.

    The best advice; mix it up and keep it fun. Also, visualize the targets as actual threats and react accordingly.
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

  11. #10
    I usually visualize the person I dislike the most and I unload on the head shot with a all 8 going into the yellow circle.

    I do visualize having to defend my home and my husband while he reloads. He has taught me a lot, but have practiced with hand guns while a teenager, by hitting an outhouse porcelain door knob.

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