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Thread: Restaurant Carry

  1. Restaurant Carry

    That's interesting cause. I just looked at your past few posts and pretty much all of them are arguments.

    Like you must prove that you are all knowing.

  2.   
  3. I get it if u like to debate, but u really come off as a arrogant prick.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Acasper708 View Post
    I get it if u like to debate, but u really come off as a arrogant prick.
    He does this on other forums too. Very Condescending, comes off as knowing of all things.

  5. #24
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    http://www.handgunlaw.us/states/georgia.pdf


    O.C.G.A. 16-11-127
    (a) As used in this Code section, the term:
    (1) 'Bar' means an establishment that is devoted to the serving of alcoholic beverages for
    consumption by guests on the premises and in which the serving of food is only incidental to the
    consumption of those beverages, including, but not limited to, taverns, nightclubs, cocktail
    lounges, and cabarets.

    Would be nice if South Carolina would make this kind of change and separate the patronage of a restaurant, with incidental alcohol consumption, from the more ominous nature of a "bar" and its related type establishments.

  6. #25
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    A ridiculous argument. Most people can handle a drink or two while carrying a firearm. No different than driving as long as not abused. Doesn't really matter if a drink will result in criminal charges. It's the civil action which will have teeth. Remember, alcohol may affect judgment way before intoxication occurs.
    .
    That being said, why is it that "horrible" NYS has no laws against bars OR restaurant carry (or churches, or parades, or state/county fairs, or police stations, or government buildings, or hospitals, or banks, or mental health facilities)? Why are pro-gun states trampling rights like this?
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    A ridiculous argument. Most people can handle a drink or two while carrying a firearm. No different than driving as long as not abused. Doesn't really matter if a drink will result in criminal charges. It's the civil action which will have teeth. Remember, alcohol may affect judgment way before intoxication occurs.
    .
    That being said, why is it that "horrible" NYS has no laws against bars OR restaurant carry?
    I agree with what you say, but I find BOTH criminal and civil charges to be relevant. I believe, however, whether it is just "perception" or real, that if you visit a bar, you are there to drink; if you visit a restaurant, drinking is secondary. That still should not be within the venue of more nanny state and the government and a bunch of legislators who now have the final say. Just like driving, CC is a privilege given to you by the state with the assumption and the directive that you follow the laws that go along with that privilege. In driving it is 08 level in blood. For CC--same number?, lower number?, higher number? As far as I am concerned if you are 08 and cannot control a "weapon" that can kill, then it is good enough for being CC. You drunk, you drive, you should be punished--kill someone it is homicide--no difference for reckless firearm handling and decision while drunk. Civil actions will "finish off" your drunken travesty. Again, you say "bar" I say drink, you say "restaurant" I say eat. It is all about perception but it still should be your decision--we are not kids and this is not suppose to be nanny state.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    It's the civil action which will have teeth. Remember, alcohol may affect judgment way before intoxication occurs.
    Again, I must ask for examples, please? So far it appears as if, according to the availability of past examples, there is a greater chance of being beaten to death with a flower pot. I can provide an example of that.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  9. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by apvbguy View Post
    I have one of those as well, is there anything you need to learn about those?
    You have just told me all I want to know about you!

  10. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by vernsimpson View Post
    You have just told me all I want to know about you!
    likewise, I have no need to be involved with closed minded twerps

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Again, I must ask for examples, please? So far it appears as if, according to the availability of past examples, there is a greater chance of being beaten to death with a flower pot. I can provide an example of that.
    Examples of what? That alcohol affects judgment?
    .
    MICHIGAN
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    DEARBORN: Police arrested drunken man for having loaded handgun
    Published: Tuesday, December 17, 2013
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    By Joe Slezak
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    DEARBORN — A man, 30, who had a loaded 9 mm handgun and a valid concealed pistol license was arrested just after midnight Saturday on a charge of possessing a firearm while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. He was a back-seat passenger in a 2004 Chevrolet Impala that was pulled over on southbound Greenfield Road near Blesser for having a cracked windshield and because the front-seat passenger wasn’t wearing a seat belt. The man who was arrested told police about the gun and license, which police confiscated. Because he was unsteady on his feet, his speech was slurred and he smelled of alcohol, he was given a breath test. His blood-alcohol level was 0.19 percent, above the state’s 0.17 percent “super drunk” standard. His blood-alcohol level at the police station was 0.20 percent. Officers smelled marijuana in the car, but the driver, 30, said his brother used the car earlier and had been smoking the drug. Police didn’t find any marijuana. The driver was ticketed for having defective equipment and not having a valid license. The front-seat passenger, who had a valid license, was allowed to drive the car.
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    MI Law - Chapter 571, Weapons Offenses, Section 571.10 (7) Nothing in this subdivision authorizes any individual who has been issued a concealed carry permit or endorsement to possess any firearm while intoxicated;
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    TEXAS - The Wilder Law Firm
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    Drunk Driving Law on Concealed Handguns... If you are pulled over or arrested for driving while intoxicated, completing a sobriety test or facing a small fine may not always be the worst of your worries. Here in Texas, many people are able to carry concealed weapons as long as they carry a proper concealed weapons permit. However, if you are found carrying your handgun while also facing a DWI charge at the same time, you could be in some serious trouble if you do not take the proper steps. If you are someone who frequently travels with a concealed weapon, you must be aware that if you drive while you are intoxicated and you have your gun with you, there is a possibility that you could be charged with two very serious fines. First, of course, is driving while intoxicated (DWI). Second, you could be charged with Unlawful Carrying of Handgun by License Holder. The law in Texas states that “a license holder commits an offense if, while intoxicated, the license holder carries a handgun under the authority of Sub-chapter H, Chapter 411, Government Code, regardless of whether the handgun is concealed.”
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    VIRGINIA
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    Section 18.2-308.012 - Any person permitted to carry a concealed handgun who is under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs while carrying such handgun in a public place is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor.
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    A civil action will have teeth in that should someone cause an injury with a gun while under the influence of alcohol they will likely face a criminal charge. Even if the use was thought to be lawful in defense of someone, the drunk is still charged under the alcohol statute. A lawsuit by an injured or aggrieved party will have teeth in that the tort need not be proven, only the damages. If the drunk is convicted of carrying while intoxicated a plaintiff in a civil action may file a motion for summary judgment. That means the tort (wrong) has already been proven in another court. In the event the actions of the drunk are egregious, willful, wonton and reckless, the element of intent is established. this allows a jury to treat the drunk as if the harm he caused was intentional... thus punitive damages. Has it happened? I don't know. Probably, considering the millions of cases that have passed through the courts. While I don't see a problem with a drink while carrying a gun I don't do it and would certainly financially take apart anyone who hurt me while under the influence. The legal cost of a defense in itself will break most people.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

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