Ruger Super Redhawk .454 Casull



Remington XP-100 In .35 Remington



Magnum Research BFR In .45-70



Magnum Research BFR In .500 S&W Magnum

These are a few of my larger handguns. Both of my Magnum Research BFR's are well put together guns. The .45-70 is not a bad weapon to shoot because the .45-70 is a low pressure cartridge compared to the .454 Casull or the .500 S&W Magnum, which both recoil considerably more. I've heard of the .500 double action S&W guns occasionally will double fire, which could lead to a dangerous situation if a person is not expecting it. One round out of these guns is enough to handle. In this video you can see how they are prone to do this.

YouTube - FULL AUTO 500 S&W

Obviously that can't happen in a single action weapon. Also, the lock work is less complicated with fewer moving parts on a single action. The .460 Smith & Wesson is built on the same X-Frame as the .500, so I'm just guessing it is prone to do much the same. The trigger return spring on the Smith's are very fast which is why guys like Jerry Miculek use them to set so many speed shooting records.

Just a few other things about the Magnum Research BFR revolvers that set them apart from other manufacturers like Ruger. The cylinder pin is held in place by a screw instead of a spring loaded plunger that locates into a detent. This is nice because the pin cannot move forward during recoil. I have this happen on one of my Ruger Blackhawks in .45 Colt with hot loads. Another feature I really like about the BFR's is when you open the loading gate, the cylinder free wheels in either direction, instead of only clockwise with all of the "clickity-clackity" like the Ruger guns do. Another feature of the Magnum Research guns is the grip frame is attached with Stainless Steel Socket Head Cap Screws. A really nice touch. My .500 S&W BFR also came with a Weaver type scope mount base and screws that match up with the drilled and tapped frame. If one were to mount a scope, you could do it easily, and even employ multiple rings if you wished to do so for added strength. Bill T.