Powder storage examples, pics...
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Powder storage examples, pics...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Off of I-80 between Des Moines and Cheyenne
    Posts
    1,207
    Blog Entries
    1

    Powder storage examples, pics...

    I looked around the forum here and saw little by way of ideas in regard to powder storage. I saw a few ideas regarding ammo storage but I'm thinking ammo cans aren't going to serve the purpose I desire in powder storage.

    I was hoping someone could give me an idea or two about what they do for powder storage in regard to fire hazard. i've read a recommendation that it's a good idea to fiend off heat as long as possible by using at least 1" of wood all round the powder as an insulation, but not so tightly as to be an enclosed blast hazard. Yes, I know, wood burns. The whole place could go up and it won't matter but in a case where the fire is attacked and extinguished with minimal reloading room involvement perhaps the idea of wooden insulation (or such) could be a benefit. I may just end up putting it in my fire-resistant, pain in the a$$ safe...

    Anyone care to share thier examples of purpose-built powder storage?
    1)"When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty." -Thomas Jefferson.
    2)"Imagine how gun control might be stomped if GOA or SAF had the (compromising) NRA's 4 million members!" -Me. http://jpfo.org/filegen-n-z/nraletter.htm

  2.   
  3. #2
    I store mine on a shelf in my loading room. Have for 30 years. Works just fine, not real cutting-edge though.
    "When war does come, my advice is to draw the sword and throw away the scabbard."
    Gen. Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

  4. I have several eight lbs. Containers and just keep them in a cherry cabinet. Make sure the primers are in a different location and away from gun oil and cleaners. I would leave the space in the safe for more jewelry.
    "When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men living together in society, they create for themselves in the course of time a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that justifies it."Frederic Bastia

  5. #4
    More jewelry? You sound like my wife. If you still have room in the safe sounds to me like you need a new gun. I hate open spaces in a gun safe. Lol

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Off of I-80 between Des Moines and Cheyenne
    Posts
    1,207
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by dumb okie View Post
    More jewelry? You sound like my wife. If you still have room in the safe sounds to me like you need a new gun. I hate open spaces in a gun safe. Lol
    Ha, +1 for sure.

    OK, so from what I'm gathering here is that it is very uncommon to do anything special, other than standard precautions. Sooo, I'll save some dough and simply place powder (containers) on a shelf, away from primers, etc. Oh, and if I'm ever able to find a sub200, by keltec, I'll take care of that little space in the safe!
    1)"When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty." -Thomas Jefferson.
    2)"Imagine how gun control might be stomped if GOA or SAF had the (compromising) NRA's 4 million members!" -Me. http://jpfo.org/filegen-n-z/nraletter.htm

  7. Quote Originally Posted by BeauRyker View Post
    I store my on a shelf in my loading room. Have for 30 years. Works just fine, not real cutting-edge though.
    I've done the same for the past year and a half or so.
    But I've been having similar concerns as yours tuts40...
    Isn't it rumored that most of the cheaper "fire resistant" gun safes are lined with a layer or 2 of drywall for fire protection? I was thinking that a simple box lined with drywall might work well...

    Thoughts?

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Off of I-80 between Des Moines and Cheyenne
    Posts
    1,207
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow68 View Post
    I've done the same for the past year and a half or so.
    But I've been having similar concerns as yours tuts40...
    Isn't it rumored that most of the cheaper "fire resistant" gun safes are lined with a layer or 2 of drywall for fire protection? I was thinking that a simple box lined with drywall might work well...

    Thoughts?
    Shadow, funny you mention that. I can't recall now exactly where I read it, but since I've been looking into this I did catch something written about insulating using "drywall a non-airtight box". I will google it...

    Back again, here's something: http://archrecord.construction.com/r...10gypsum-3.asp
    Last edited by tuts40; 08-24-2011 at 03:02 PM. Reason: apply link
    1)"When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty." -Thomas Jefferson.
    2)"Imagine how gun control might be stomped if GOA or SAF had the (compromising) NRA's 4 million members!" -Me. http://jpfo.org/filegen-n-z/nraletter.htm

  9. Well there we are! Great info.

    I found this quote interesting as well.
    “The gypsum in the core of the board actually emits steam when exposed to fire and retards transfer through the panel. <snip>
    That answers the "cooling" question as well...

    Hmmm, I might have to put this on my project to do list - it seems like it would be cheap and easy to do.
    I'd probably just start with some sort of wooden chest - like a foot locker, but about half the size.
    Time to start scrounging for one...

  10. I almost forgot another 2 cents I meant to add...

    I don't think I'd put it in the safe for the same reason you'd mentioned about not making an airtight box. I'd think that it would be an enclosed blast hazard in there as well.
    Granted, it would only be once the safe gets really, really hot - but everything else in the safe probably has a much higher temperature tolerance.

    Oxygen from the air is not necessary for the combustion of smokeless powders since they contain sufficient built-in oxygen to burn completely, even in an enclosed space such as the chamber of a firearm.
    In effect, ignition occurs when the powder granules are heated above their ignition temperature. This can occur by exposing powder to:
    1.A flame such as a match or primer flash.
    2.An electrical spark or the sparks from welding, grinding, etc.
    3.Heat from an electric hot plate or a fire directed against or near a closed container even if the powder itself is not exposed to the flame.
    from Alliant Powder - Storage & Handling

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast