Can't find answer to this either: +p 380 auto - Page 2
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Thread: Can't find answer to this either: +p 380 auto

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by reddragonrph View Post
    I DON"T want +p. I was told it might damage my gun. I wasn't sure whether the +p is ALWAYS marked on there, or whether I was supposed to know some other way. LIke I said....extreme noob here, and I don't really have anyone to ask questions around here. I appreciate all the info, everyone.

    Easy answer is that since they apparently don't make .380 +p you should be good with factory ammo. From what I understand, in most instances the cartridge head stamp should be marked as +p (ie. 9mm Luger +p). There may be exceptions, for example some ammo designed for .38 special guns might be marked as "Super" rather than "+p"

    Because most .380's are lightweight and designed for CC, I don't think any of the guns are designed for +p; and by default, I don't think ammo manufacturers would waste time making ammo no one will buy.

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  3. #12
    .38 Super is a totally different cartridge designed for auto loaders, derived from the .38 ACP (not the same as .380 ACP). It doesn't share anything with .38 Special. Can't say I've ever heard of any ammo marketed or stamped as "Super" for a .38 Special.

  4. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by reddragonrph View Post
    My manufacturer says not to use +p, so I was trying to avoid it. I was confused by whether +p is ALWAYS marked, or if I was supposed to know with some other stat on the box. Clearly I am knowledge deficient, this was stated early on by me. If anyone has any good reference material I would be grateful for a referral. I need something that isn't hypertechnical, much like a "Handguns and Ammo for Dummies". I don't know anybody with guns, so I have nobody to ask or talk to.
    If the ammo you're buying is made by a SAAMI-compliant manufacturer, and I'd say nearly all of the large commercial firms in the US are for safety/legal reasons, it will have the proper markings on the box and on the case heads so you know what you're loading your mags with regarding the pressure of the round (+P, +P+, etc.).

    As strange as it sounds, you may want to invest in a reloading manual for the sake of understanding how ammunition is loaded, what makes up the various components in a cartridge, how they interface with the various actions whether they're rimless, rimmed, etc. in terms of handguns regarding the headspacing, and other related info. Each reloader typically has a preference or two on reloading data, but I really like and enjoy the Lee reloading manual which can be found easily online or in most reloading supply shops from around $12-$20. The reason I like it so much is for some of the history and explanations given on many of these subjects and quite a few more as it pertains to putting together your own handloads. Even if you never endeavor into reloading it still outfits you with quite a breadth of knowledge on what to look for with regards to troubleshooting some ammo-related problems, plenty of technical data on many cartridges reloaded today including dimensions, etc. Some don't like the Lee book since he tends to market a lot of his products in the book, but it's all done tastefully and I don't believe it detracts from the value of the knowledge he provides and in fact educates you on things to look for in reloading equipment. I personally enjoy and use a lot of their products for reloading. For the true reloader, multiple manuals/books is the way to go to double- and triple-check your data prior to assembling and firing your ammo.

    Regarding the subject at hand, I can't think of any .380 ACP ammo off-hand that I'd warn or recommend against using in a firearm over considerations of safety because of the amount of energy expelled with each cartridge, and the +P warning is honestly a generic warning or recommendation found in nearly every firearm manual purchased today for liability reasons. Most guns of modern manufacture from anyone half decent can likely handle at least a handful of +P ammo IF it's produced in said cartridge but the general thought process is it's harder on the gun and should be used sparingly when possible. I'm certain there are genuine cases where heeding the warning is absolutely a must given the type of action or construction of the gun, but generally speaking guns are proofed and made to handle firing a cartridge that's significantly hotter than what you'll shoot at the range for the simple sake of verifying the integrity of the gun and its build strength to protect you from a potential disaster, and the manufacturer themselves in court.

  5. Thank you for the info, folks! Spasmonaut, I will look for that book, thank you.

  6. #15
    LCPs specifically are placarded against any kind of a .380 +P round.

  7. #16
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    All ammunition designations will be stamped on your gun. I agree with others and cannot find any data for +P or +P+ for a 380. Regardless, if the gun accepted those cartridges, it would be imprinted on the gun, usually along the barrel or the slide. Do not use any cartridge not specifically designated for the gun, the best that happens is the gun is damaged, the worst that happens is you or someone close by is damaged when it comes apart during firing.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hwbjr View Post
    All ammunition designations will be stamped on your gun. I agree with others and cannot find any data for +P or +P+ for a 380. Regardless, if the gun accepted those cartridges, it would be imprinted on the gun, usually along the barrel or the slide. Do not use any cartridge not specifically designated for the gun, the best that happens is the gun is damaged, the worst that happens is you or someone close by is damaged when it comes apart during firing.
    There is no difference in the cartridge between .380 and .380 +p or +p+, which means they will fit. No gun will be "imprinted" with a +p, just the caliber. Your owners manual or any info from the gun mfg will be the only way to know if it will shoot +p.
    -
    I personally don't see the advantage. To rely on a gun you need to practice with it. You should practice with the ammo you plan to carry, or a similar grain/velocity etc FMJ ammo. If practicing with ammo that is not recommended for the gun may lead to failure (especially when you really need it) why chance it? If you want to shoot +p ammo, do your research and buy a damn gun designed for it.
    Chief

  9. #18
    To wrap up this thread, I'd say we can all agree that as .380 Auto +P doesn't exist, meaning there is no SAAMI specification for it like there is for 9mm Luger +P, .45 ACP +P, etc., that there really shouldn't be any cause for concern here. If someone finds ammo listed as .380 Auto +P, the best advice would be to steer clear since no one has a specification for that pressure rating that's designated as +P in .380 Auto. If you're using ammo that someone has loaded past SAAMI specification and wants to label it as +P, you're doing so at your own risk. I imagine the manuals are printed this way to simply save themselves the legal grief should someone ever devise or develop a SAAMI spec for .380 Auto +P and come to find that their particular gun isn't up to the task. Now you can't say they didn't warn you.

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