Which load for my .45? - Page 2
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Thread: Which load for my .45?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by BigSlick View Post
    Unless you are filming the latest Die Hard 6 or want to become a hood ornament getting out of the way sounds like the right move to me.
    Nahhh, I like the Die Hard option. Empty all rounds from both pistols (cause obviously your dual wielding), through the windshield before combat rolling up the hood and over the car. And don't forget to do it in slow motion. And save the girl.

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  3. Quote Originally Posted by BigSlick View Post
    Unless you are filming the latest Die Hard 6 or want to become a hood ornament getting out of the way sounds like the right move to me.
    Ha I was more or less being sarcastic. I'm sure there are circumstances where you can shoot through a windshield and not be in front of it.

  4. #13
    no, the 230 gr loads DONT stay inside what you hit. They are going too slow to expand in flesh. Dont take my word for it, shoot some vermin animals, lengthwise and NOTICE that the exit woiunds look exactly like the entrance wounds! If the 200 gr loads are not plus P and fired from a 5" barrel, they probably won't expand in flesh, either.

  5. Which load for my .45?

    I've read that a lot as well, that the 230 grain just doesn't move fast enough for proper expansion. I decided to go with the 185 grain Golden Sabers, which will get 950-975 fps even from a 4" barrel.

  6. Well we're required to use Speer Gold Dot so it's either the 230gr or 200gr +P. And if the +P is gonna be hard on my gun I don't want that either. So 230gr it is.

  7. #16
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    So our Sheriff's Office makes us carry Speer Gold Dot in all our guns. So I found a box of 20 rounds of 230gr standard pressure (890fps) for like $28 and another box with 50 rounds of 200gr +P (1065fps) for $45. Which would be the better choice, factoring out price.
    For what it's worth, our Sheriff's Office requires 230 gr for the 45 and 180 gr for the 40.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    I actually am the same way when it comes to Facebook and other types of stuff. I'm not really sure where that so comes from but I've noticed I do it a lot lately. Now that I think hard about it though, I'm pretty sure it comes from my fiancé. She's got a habit of starting sentences that way and it's probably rubbing off. I'll be sure to pay attention though.

    But as far as the slower and heavier rounds vs the faster lighter rounds, I was just thinking that it being a "duty" round, I may want the extra speed. Reason being, I've always been told that it takes very close to 1,000fps to effectively go through a windshield. I don't know if there's any truth to that or not, but the way I was looking at it is that most of the officers are using 180gr .40S&W rounds which are moving right around 1,000fps even. So I'm getting more velocity and still a heavier bullet.
    When you go through firearms training, you'll more than likely be told to never try to shoot at a windshield or at tires (especially moving). The windshield is angled and your round can easily ricochet upward at an angle with a little lawyer sitting on that round. The moving tires will also deflect your round. This kind of shooting is Hollywood stuff and not what happens in real life.

    Shooting at a non-moving car is a different story.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  9. #18
    ezkl2230 Guest
    For defensive use, the 230 grain.

  10. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    I actually am the same way when it comes to Facebook and other types of stuff. I'm not really sure where that so comes from but I've noticed I do it a lot lately. Now that I think hard about it though, I'm pretty sure it comes from my fiancé. She's got a habit of starting sentences that way and it's probably rubbing off. I'll be sure to pay attention though.

    But as far as the slower and heavier rounds vs the faster lighter rounds, I was just thinking that it being a "duty" round, I may want the extra speed. Reason being, I've always been told that it takes very close to 1,000fps to effectively go through a windshield. I don't know if there's any truth to that or not, but the way I was looking at it is that most of the officers are using 180gr .40S&W rounds which are moving right around 1,000fps even. So I'm getting more velocity and still a heavier bullet.
    When you go through firearms training, you'll more than likely be told to never try to shoot at a windshield or at tires (especially moving). The windshield is angled and your round can easily ricochet upward at an angle with a little lawyer sitting on that round. The moving tires will also deflect your round. This kind of shooting is Hollywood stuff and not what happens in real life.

    Shooting at a non-moving car is a different story.
    I saw on an episode of CSI several years ago (I know, it's Hollywood) that when a BG shot through a windshield the bullet actually deflected downward. The reason they gave for this, is that because he was shooting hollow points and the windshield is obviously slanted, the bottom lip of of hollow point contacted the glass first and "caught" causing the bullet to nose downward. To my thinking, even if the bullet nosed down, since it's moving on it's own momentum and no longer being propelled, there's no force pushing it in the new direction it's now facing and it would just tumble. The idea of it deflecting downward to me is implausible but the hollow point "catching" on the glass and tumbling seems possible to me. Not really sure the point of this post, just something interesting to think about.

  11. I was thinking I had always heard that +P rounds were only bad to do in 1911's with an alloy frame. This Ruger has a solid stainless frame. Are they still bad on steel frames if you're only going to be shooting the +P for defensive use?

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