Practicality of reloading 9mm Luger rounds? - Page 2
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Thread: Practicality of reloading 9mm Luger rounds?

  1. #11
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    The other issue is that you can tailor the round to your specifications. I tend to prefer FP, SWC or TC bullets as they leave a much nicer impression on the target. FMJ tends to tear, FP, SWC and TC are more of a hole punch.

    There's also the issue that you already have the initial investment if you migrate to other calibers.
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  3. Practicality

    I have never met anyone who felt reloading was not practical. With the cost of ammo today, reloading is better than ever. Reloading 9mm is no more difficult than reloading .45, .38 spl or .357 magnum. You mentioned Blazer brass. I have never seen Blazer brass. All of the Blazer ammo I have ever seen uses aluminum cases with Berdan primers. I once found about fifteen cases that showed me some idiot was reloading Blazer ammo. They had drilled and formed a primer pocket to use Boxer primers, and had reloaded 9mm ammo. The casings showed definite signs of falling apart in the gun, probably with disastrous results. Blazer ammo is not designed to be reloaded, but the casings are to be discarded. I used to reload .45ACP, .38spl and .357magnum. I was able to shoot a lot more than I would have been able to if I had to buy all new ammo. I even cast my own bullets. For fun, my lieutenant and I used to load watch batteries in .45ACP and fire them. Fun, fun, fun!
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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzfuz View Post
    I have never met anyone who felt reloading was not practical. With the cost of ammo today, reloading is better than ever. Reloading 9mm is no more difficult than reloading .45, .38 spl or .357 magnum. You mentioned Blazer brass. I have never seen Blazer brass. All of the Blazer ammo I have ever seen uses aluminum cases with Berdan primers. I once found about fifteen cases that showed me some idiot was reloading Blazer ammo. They had drilled and formed a primer pocket to use Boxer primers, and had reloaded 9mm ammo. The casings showed definite signs of falling apart in the gun, probably with disastrous results. Blazer ammo is not designed to be reloaded, but the casings are to be discarded. I used to reload .45ACP, .38spl and .357magnum. I was able to shoot a lot more than I would have been able to if I had to buy all new ammo. I even cast my own bullets. For fun, my lieutenant and I used to load watch batteries in .45ACP and fire them. Fun, fun, fun!

    Blazer Brass comes in a black and gold colored box. I often purchase the brass version when the aluminum is either more expensive or not available. As for Blazer Aluminum, they are designed for one time use. All calibers larger than 9mm have a 2 part flash hole. Don't believe me, go punch out the primer from an expended 9mm Blazer Aluminum case and see for yourself. The reason I know is that we punch the primers on expended Blazer Aluminum cases to make key chains that are a popular item among the tourists and fellow firearms instructors.

    I'm surprised that you have never heard of "Blazer Brass" ammo. I would think that a "former LEO" would be more dilligent at checking FACTS. If you check out their website, you'll see that they do make ammo with brass and aluminum cases. What may be a shock to you as well is that "Wolf" ammo comes in both steel cases and brass. The brass cases cost a dollar or two more per box depending on the caliber.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuzfuz View Post
    I have never met anyone who felt reloading was not practical. With the cost of ammo today, reloading is better than ever. Reloading 9mm is no more difficult than reloading .45, .38 spl or .357 magnum. You mentioned Blazer brass. I have never seen Blazer brass. All of the Blazer ammo I have ever seen uses aluminum cases with Berdan primers. I once found about fifteen cases that showed me some idiot was reloading Blazer ammo. They had drilled and formed a primer pocket to use Boxer primers, and had reloaded 9mm ammo. The casings showed definite signs of falling apart in the gun, probably with disastrous results. Blazer ammo is not designed to be reloaded, but the casings are to be discarded. I used to reload .45ACP, .38spl and .357magnum. I was able to shoot a lot more than I would have been able to if I had to buy all new ammo. I even cast my own bullets. For fun, my lieutenant and I used to load watch batteries in .45ACP and fire them. Fun, fun, fun!
    GF is correct on Blazer Brass. I see Blazer non-brass casings as a nuisance along with steel casings to toss down the range when policing for brass.

    Blazer brass has been around for awhile. I started noticing the spent Blazer brass casings at the range before checking into it online. You might call me a brass whore as I hoard brass or as my ex-wife would say Jewish by financial right. I am not being antisemite; my ex-wife is Jewish and an accountant.

    After pricing it out, Blazer brass is less expensive at the local SuperWallyVerse than USA (WWB) or UMC. It is definitely reloadable as I've examined policed Blazer Brass casings.

    So did you also do a submission for the boxotruth on watch battery bullets too? What grain were those watch batteries anyway?
    Fun, fun, fun!
    Yes, we can agree that shooting things is fun.
    Know the law; don't ask, don't tell.
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    Happy new 1984; 25 years behind schedule. Send lawyers, guns and money...the SHTF...

  6. #15
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    Just for information. Contrary to popular belief Berdan primed brass can be reloaded however, it's not worth the time. Berdan primers are getting very hard to find. RCBS makes Berdan depriming and priming tools. There are three sizes of Berdan primers 4.5 mm, 5.5 mm and 6.34mm. Berdan primed brass can be converted to boxer primers by using this method. http://users.ameritech.net/mchandler/primer.html Bottom line is they can be reloaded but it's not worth the time and effort, however if brass becomes scarce then it may become an alternative.
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  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by netentity View Post
    I see Blazer non-brass casings as a nuisance along with steel casings to toss down the range when policing for brass.
    If I go looking for brass, I sweep it all up together because it's faster. You can easily separate the steel ones with a strong magnet. If you have a scrap pile, throw the steel and aluminum into a can. They add up over time and can be turned into cash when you haul the rest of the metal in.

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  8. #17
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    I been reloading for over 30 years now and really don't worry about the costs of it. I do save a lot with my reloads vs buying factory ammo. My 223 will consistantly shoot 1/4" groups at 100yds any time (Savage accutrigger, bull barrel). It's fun and relaxing once you get used to it. I cast my own bullets for hand guns and have even found a sporting goods shop and a gun smith that buy my bullets for resale (which puts more $$'s in my pocket for more reloading supplies) which works fine with me. Just work up your loads carefully, always carry a notebook and a pencil with you until you get your desired load, then have a ball.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by Pele View Post

    A buddy of mine got a nasty old car battery from me and said he wants to cut it up and melt the lead down for his bullets. To me, this sounds:
    A.) Dangerous; Even though the acid is gone, that's mostly Lead-Sulfide in there, not pure lead.
    [/b]
    You got that right. Tell him to find some lead wheel weights from a tire shop instead.

  10. I prefer to reload for revolvers. With any semi auto its a pain to pick up the brass. At indoor ranges the brass goes in all directions. Outdoors the brass gets lost in the grass. Its best to mark your brass so that its easy to identify. Other than that I am in favor of reloading.

  11. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by KimberPB View Post
    It's all in what you load. I picked up a box of 500 124gr lead round nose for $22 a month or so ago. so that works out to:

    ~ 0.04 a round - bullet
    ~ 0.03 a round - primers
    ~ 0.01 a round - powder

    Coming out to be ~$4 a box of 50. For practice lead round are cheap and work great. If you want to go jacketed Zero has jacked bullets for ~$43 per 500 so that works out to ~$8 a box. So the savings not as much but still there.

    I reload 9mm, .45ACP, and .223 rem and have paid for my press twice over already. I also get much better accuracy out of my AR. I have the Lee Classic turret press and I have no problem loading 100-150 rounds an hour. Red Hat is right it is addicting and fun.

    Hope this helped and welcome to the forum.
    I agree with the prices but I load with a Dillion 550 and have no problem getting 300 to 400 rounds an hour.

    Steve

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