Practicality of reloading 9mm Luger rounds? - Page 4
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Thread: Practicality of reloading 9mm Luger rounds?

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by billt View Post
    If you want to shoot steel cased Russian garbage, then yes. The cheapest boxer primed, brass cased, reloadable .223 that I've seen today is $6.49 a box for PMC at Cabela's. That equates to $324.50 a thousand. Classic Arms has some U.A.E. manufactured reloadable, brass cased stuff a little cheaper, but the guys I've spoken with say it shoots "soft", and won't cycle some AR-15's reliably. It's worth it simply because of the brass, which you should be picking up regardless of where you shoot, or if you reload or not. Leaving empty, cases on the ground is nothing more than pure and simple littering. Someone else is going to have to pick them up if you don't. That is how many shooting areas out here in Arizona are getting closed down. The last thing we as shooters need are more slob shooters than we already have.

    You need to shop someplace else. I don't shoot any steel in my guns. Poorly Made Crap was under 300 bucks a 1000 where I live. Since I shoot between anywhere from 2 to 6 matches a month money is a big concern ( just ask my wife), but so is my time.

    No matter how you do the math, reloading is worth it if you buy your components wisely. I've proven that to myself in over 4 decades of shooting. There is no way I could afford to shoot as much as I do if I didn't reload. Component cost is always relative to loaded ammunition cost.

    Depends on how much your time is worth and how much time you have vs. the savings on the ammo. If you pick up your brass and sell it it closes the savings gap between loading and buying, too.

    For the guy who wants to go out and bump fire a few magazine fulls of ammo into a hillside twice a month on his lunch break, then no, reloading is not going to pay off. But when you are feeding a total of 10 AR-15 rifles that get shot by 2 people on an average of twice a week, there is no way a person is going to support that without reloading unless they earn a salary far above the average shooter. And even then they are just wasting more money if they don't reload. They will simply be able to afford to waste it easier. Bill T.

    It doesn't really matter how many rifles you have you can only shoot one at a time unless you're being Rambo and shooting with one in each hand.

    Most of the ammo I reload is 40. It is the most cost effective for the time I have to spend and I shoot a lot of pistol, and only 300 rounds of rifle or so a month.

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glendale, Arizona
    Posts
    1,257
    If you read my original post I give detailed information on how I reloaded 2,350 rounds of .223 for $342.59. When you can buy it that cheap, please let me know where. Bill T.

  4. #33
    Yes great savings but not everybody is going to get free brass, but on the other hand not everybody is going to buy boxes either.

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glendale, Arizona
    Posts
    1,257
    The main issue with reloading cost is where you obtain your components. Too many people pick up a Cabela's catalog, and using their component prices as a baseline, dismiss reloading as "not worth it". Like anything else you buy in quantity, you must shop around for the best price if you expect to save. In over 40 years of shooting and reloading, I've picked up enough empty shotgun hulls and brass off the ground to fill a 2 car garage solid. Today as more people are getting into reloading it is becoming more difficult, but there is still a lot of brass avaliable for the picking. Especially in the cheaper, more common calibers like 9 MM and .223.

    It was the same 25 years ago when .308 and .30-06 was then considered to be common and cheap at the time. I would collect boxes of the stuff because most shooters couldn't be bothered with it. I would even have guys come over and ask me if I wanted their brass, after they saw me scrounging for it. I always said yes, even if it was for a caliber I didn't reload for at the time. Sooner or later I did, and that brass was put into good use.

    Many leave 9 MM and .223 on the ground at my local club because they feel it is simply too cheap to bother with. While that may or may not be true today, you can bet the cheap prices won't last much longer. I'm surprised they've lasted this long. The days of factory, brass cased, reloadable 9 MM for under $10.00 a box aren't going to be with us much longer, as the prices of the raw materials used in ammunition keep rising, (Brass, Copper, and Lead). It is one of the main reasons so many manufacturers are going to steel cased ammunition. Especially the Russian manufacturers. Brass is a premium commodity in that country. Even American companies like Hornady are now producing steel cased 7.62 X 39 MM ammo at premium prices.

    Another area shooters better start paying attention to is lead. You are already seeing places like Cabela's touting an entire section devoted to "Lead Free Ammo". I have well over 2 tons of lead based bullet casting material stockpiled. Most of it I got for nothing where I worked over the years. I also have purchased many multi cavity bullet molds in various configurations over the years. My wife and I purchased a ton of lead shot, (80, 25 pound bags), direct from Scott Shot up in St. George Utah some years back for $12.00 a bag. We still have a large portion of it. Today it sells anywhere from $30.00 to $45.00 a bag.

    Some indoor ranges already do not allow lead based ammunition to be shot, and California has mandated lead free ammo for hunting in several counties. A "lead ban" can only be exercised so far. You'll always be able to shoot lead somewhere. But with that said you have to have it to be able to shoot it. When I'm bored in the cooler weather, I'll cast up a few thousand bullets. It didn't cost me anything for the metal to do it, and that translates into even more savings and shooting.

    As I said, I've been doing this sort of thing since I got out of high school in 1970, 40 years ago. Over the decades it has paid off well, and continues to do so. For someone starting out in reloading it still can, you just have to shop carefully for your components. Paying too much for anything negates any savings you might experience from it down the road. Reloading components are like anything else, the cheaper they can be obtained, the "better" they are. Bill T.

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