Equipment questions
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Thread: Equipment questions

  1. Equipment questions

    I'm thinking about reloading my own ammo. I want to reload 9mm and .223. I'm looking at the Lee equipment, and specifically the Pro 100 and Load Master kits. My questions are:

    1) What is the difference between the two kits?
    2) Is one better than the other for a novice reloader (bearing in mind my two desired calibers)?
    3) CAN I load both calibers on either/both of these kits?
    4) Is switching calibers relatively easy with these kits?
    5) What other equipment will I need to get started (other than the kit and a bench)?

    All help is appreciated. I look forward to hearing what everyone has to say.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by magicman007 View Post
    I'm thinking about reloading my own ammo. I want to reload 9mm and .223. I'm looking at the Lee equipment, and specifically the Pro 100 and Load Master kits. My questions are:

    1) What is the difference between the two kits?
    2) Is one better than the other for a novice reloader (bearing in mind my two desired calibers)?
    3) CAN I load both calibers on either/both of these kits?
    4) Is switching calibers relatively easy with these kits?
    5) What other equipment will I need to get started (other than the kit and a bench)?

    All help is appreciated. I look forward to hearing what everyone has to say.
    There's a lot of equipment that you will need to reload. Here's what I can think of off hand:

    Reload bench
    Reload Press
    Load chart from a competent source. Find the most common info available.
    Dies for the calibers you're reloading and case lube
    Case trimmer
    Powder measure
    Brass tumbler with proper media and case polish
    Reload trays
    Reload boxes (You can save factory ammo boxes, but be sure to label properly)
    Bullet puller (in the event that you notice a mistake in loading or have ammo that you want to recycle components from)

    I haven't done any serious reloading in a while, so I may have left out a few items. I'm sure the other members will be able to help you out.

    Happy reloading.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  4. GF, thanks for the reply. I'm more interested in the specifics of the two press kits I listed than a generic list of supplies though. I want to know which of these two kits would be better for a novice and then what other equipment I'll need to go along with that kit. I understand I need a press and a bench, and each kit comes with one die set for either caliber. So those things I already understand. Thanks for the list of other equipment too. But how about the kits? What are the pros and cons of each and which would be better suited to my purposes?

  5. #4
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    Looks like the "Loadmaster" will be more versitile. Should you decide to reload larger "mag" rifle calibers in the future. Lee makes excellent equipment. Very user friendly, and good quality.

    I've used Dillon, Lee and RCBS equipment. I prefer the Lee and RCBS because a lot of their dies are interchangeable.

    According to the Lee website, both kits have just about everything you need to start reloading within minutes of bolting the press to the reload bench.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  6. i have the lee pro 100 I can really pump out rounds of 9m.
    As for 223 i dont know. Thier are some rifle rounds the the lee pro can not reload ( to small) i would call lee and talk to them to make sure it can reload .223 before i go any farther.

  7. #6
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    I believe you are referring to the 1000 pro vs the load Master. I have the pro 1000 and it's a good press. I'd go with the Load Master kit. It's a heavier built press and it will cover a lot more calibers than the 1000.
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

  8. #7
    I concur with redhat. I have the pro1000 and use it only for pistol calibers. I do not have a progressive for rifle stuff.

    You can reload .223 on the pro 1000. However, you cannot case feed. This is a minor detail but I believe you can with the loadmaster.

    If this is the very beginning of your reloading hobby, make sure you take it SLOW when you start out. While I like the pro 1000, it is not the easiest thing to set up. Make sure you have a good scale and a set of mics. Use a published load. Do not rush. Make only good ammunition. Label it well.

    I always try to use a powder such that the case is obviously overful if I manage to double charge it. I have never done it, but I know that I cannot make a double charge round unless I am completely negligent. I use Unique for 9mm by the way, but there are other powders (cleaner too) that will achieve the same result.

    -Matt

  9. Thanks all for the replies. I appreciate them.

    I am speaking of the pro 1000. Sorry, my keyboard stuck and didn't type the extra "0" and I didn't realize it.

    I've done some reaseach of the Lee presses and found that the Pro 1000 actaully will reload the .223, but the charging die wouldn't be carbide. Does that make a big difference?

    What I'm thinking of doing is getting the pro 1000 in 9mm as a kit, and then add the .223 over the next few months............my ar parts won't be here intil the end of February or so anyway. That way, I can start reloading my 9mm's now.

    Now, a coupld other questions:

    What powder should I start with? Does brand of primer matter? And if so, which ones are best?

    I'm going to order a reloading book from Amazon next, so I'll start reading up as sson as I get it. I'm starting to get excited about this now.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by magicman007 View Post

    I've done some reaseach of the Lee presses and found that the Pro 1000 actaully will reload the .223, but the charging die wouldn't be carbide. Does that make a big difference?



    Now, a coupld other questions:

    What powder should I start with? Does brand of primer matter? And if so, which ones are best?

    I'm going to order a reloading book from Amazon next, so I'll start reading up as sson as I get it. I'm starting to get excited about this now.
    Carbide dies are much nicer. You do not have to lubricate the case. However, none of my rifle dies are carbide. Only my handgun. I don't recall Lee offering carbide rifle dies.
    I usually use Hodgdon powder. That's just because it seems to be in largest supply with my dealer. Just find one that says it will work with 223 caliber. There are obviously a few different size primers, but i have used Federal, Winchester, CCI and never had an issue with any of them.
    David

    The only person available to protect you 24 hours a day is you.

  11. #10
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    Carbide rifle dies are very expensive. I use a spray case lube on mine and I reload 223 and 223x6mm on my 1000 using standard dies. My 1000 also feeds 223 brass fine. I bought the 6 tube adapter for brass feed for mine. The only problem with the 1000 is the primer system. Once you get it adjusted correctly it will work fine for a while until one turns sideways. A dental pick and compressed air for blowing powder out of the index is a must.
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

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