Finger on trigger guard
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Thread: Finger on trigger guard

  1. Finger on trigger guard

    On my Glock 26, there is a squared off trigger guard and a bit of checked material (same as what I have on the handle) where your fingers are supposed to go. i've tried holding the gun with my weak side index finger in this position, and.. to be honest, it feels kinda good on this small gun. That said, I wanted to get everyone's opinion before I go out shooting like this today in case its a bad habit waiting to happen.

    So.. finger resting in front of trigger guard when shooting? I'm a strong believer in practice what you'll use so I'm not interested in having two seperate grips for SD or at the range. One grip -- is this one going to get me in trouble?

    Thanks
    migm

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Gray Court, SC
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    Yes that's what it is for. If it feels comfortable to you use it. I do on some of my firearms and some I don't. It just depends on how they feel to me.
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    TN, the patron state of shootin stuff
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    It will help you manage the recoil and get back on target for quick follow up shots . Practice using it that way.

  5. It certainly feels like a tighter grip and it's easier to do the push-pull method also.. I guess I'll have to give it a shot when the range opens :)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Cajun Land
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    OK, I'll be the desenter here...... Not meaning to cause ill feelings toward anyone who uses the finger on the trigger guard, but, when I taught my classes I preached against it. Have you seen what usually happens when someone shoots a pistol that way. The finger usually comes off of the trigger guard. It will actually slow you down as you readjust your grip and replace your finger. I have seen some use it to move the front end of the pistol, but that is improper grip and time consuming. Works great until those targets pick up a gun and shoot back and you have to shoot fast.

    At one time, back in the 70's and early 80's it was envogue to have a finger thingy on the front of the trigger guard, so everyone started putting them there, whether they needed them or not. It was just that the "shooting public" had to have it. Notice, most 1911 guns don't have the checkered area anymore. There's a reason for that. The guys who usually shoot the 1911's in compatition or for service use, don't need'em or want'em. Some manufacturers are starting to leave them off of the guns now.

    I find most NEW and untrained shooters will tend to use the finger on the front of the trigger guard, because it has somewhat of a level of comfort and they figure it's there for a reason, so you must need to do it. But a good, solid grip, shoved up high on the grip frame, thumbs held high, thumbs pointing foward toward the target, is the proper grip for fast, accurate, and recoil controlled shooting. The idea is to get as high on the grip as possible (the real reason for a beavertail) and fully wrap all fingers around the grip surface area, then use the second hand to firm up and support that grip. When you remove one finger, stretch it out and place it on the front of the trigger guard, it tends to make your grip weaker, by opening part of the hand and insome cases reaching the grip around more just to reach the hook. This is not proper combat grip for shooting in self defense or under stress. Try both and tell me I'm wrong. Watch guys like Jerry Miculek or Doug Koenig shoot in competition and tell me how they grip the gun. If you ever see footage of professional SWAT/ Tactical shooters, you don't see the finger around the front of the guard. There is a reason for that!!! You may find the rare occassion of a pro shooter who does, and maybe grew up shooting that way and made it work, but those cases are rare.
    There's Something Goin' On Here, and it Ain't Funny!!!

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by migm View Post
    On my Glock 26, there is a squared off trigger guard and a bit of checked material (same as what I have on the handle) where your fingers are supposed to go. i've tried holding the gun with my weak side index finger in this position, and.. to be honest, it feels kinda good on this small gun. That said, I wanted to get everyone's opinion before I go out shooting like this today in case its a bad habit waiting to happen.

    So.. finger resting in front of trigger guard when shooting? I'm a strong believer in practice what you'll use so I'm not interested in having two seperate grips for SD or at the range. One grip -- is this one going to get me in trouble?

    Thanks
    migm
    I was trained on the Beretta M-9 by a Marine Corps Gunny, for qualification to carry while standing watch in port.

    ***Disclaimer*** I was never an active duty Sailor. I was "stationed" on a ship in Norfolk during a summer ROTC cruise. I asked to participate in pistol training and was allowed.

    The M-9 has the same trigger guard, and that is how I was trained to hold it. In fact, the position of the index finger around the trigger guard wasn't just so you'd have a place to put an otherwise lazy finger with nowhere to be, but you were to actually "Punch" the pistol into your left hand & tightly bear against it while shooting. I had never fired a pistol before then, and have continued to shoot that way ever since.
    Victory rewards not the army that fires the most rounds, but who is the more accurate shot. ---Unknown

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