best gun for a woman?
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Thread: best gun for a woman?

  1. best gun for a woman?

    I'm looking into buying a handgun. I've looked at the Taurus PT 111 and the Taurus Slimline. I DO NOT want a revolver. Everyone keeps saying that's what I should get though. My fiance has a Sccy CPX-1 9mm and I can shoot it with no problem, and rack the slide back. He had a full sized Glock that he sold, and I was terrified to shoot that one, but I'm comfortable with his new one. What are some recommendations and if you agree on a Revolver please explain! Thanks!

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Rogers, AR
    Posts
    63
    There is no rule that says your first gun should be a revolver instead of an automatic. I see people suggesting revolvers to women all the time, and if that's the primary reason they tell you to get one, it's the wrong reason.

    The best way to find something you like is try everything you can get your hands on. Why are you terrified of the Glock? If it was a 9mm, you might find the recoil to be easier than the Sccy, simply because the Glock has more weight to it.

    My suggestion would be to find something that feels right in your hands, and that you are capable of easily manipulating all that gun's functions, like racking the slide, ejecting and inserting the magazine, the safety if it has one, etc.

    After you do that, see if there's a model in a caliber you are comfortable shooting. You don't want someone to talk you into too much or too little gun, so try to get some range time with different calibers. You may end up with a 9mm, or you might find that .45 isn't as bad as it might seem.

    I don't know you personally, and none of this is intended to disparage you, or women shooters in general. I guarantee you'd get different answers from people if you posted this as a man somewhere else, and that's not really fair. Find what feels best to you, in a caliber that you are confident with. This should be the rule for any gender.

    Probably the best type of handgun for you will be a double-action only, or a striker-fired pistol like the Glock, without a safety. That way, you don't have to mess with two different trigger pulls, a cocked hammer, or a safety, which will make learning the weapon much easier. I wouldn't count out revolvers until you try one, as they definitely have less possible malfunctions to deal with than a semi-auto, but again, try to handle every pistol you can until you find the one that feels right to you.

    Let me know if something I said doesn't make sense, or if you have any further questions, or even if I just need to shut up
    The mighty oak was once a little nut who held it's ground.


  4. Thanks for the first thing you said! My fiance asked in one of his posts what would be best for me to carry, and he said I don't want a revolver, but the replies were stuff like "she should just get over the revolver thing". Which obviously ticked me off. I'm not ruling it out, I'll try anything, I'm just not interested in it. I'm not really sure why I was afraid to shoot the glock..maybe because the guy at the pawn shop called it the "fire breathing dragon". I was scared at first to shoot his Sccy, but I finally did it and it was not bad at all. Plus the Glock would not fit my hand, it was way too big! I wouldn't have been able to hold on to it. And i'm not looking for anything without a safety due to the fact we have 3 small children. Even though yes the guns in the house are stored properly, but as a precaution I'd like to have a safety.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    pell city alabama
    Posts
    22
    just to clarify on the glock it was a 20 c 10 mm auto that thing had some recoil and it was loud she was terified of it. hated to sell it loved that thing but im a big bore fan i bout the 9 simply for a carry pistol and to have something she can shoot

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Rogers, AR
    Posts
    63
    Dear God, a 10mm? Hell, I'd be scared to shoot that!

    I've found that even the compact Glocks are too blocky in my big hands. When I was looking for my first handgun, I first decided I wanted a German-made pistol, so I held the H&K USP, which turned out to be way too massive for a concealed carry piece. I then rented a full size Glock in .40 (for those who will ask, I know the Glock is Austrian), and I decided I didn't like shooting .40, or the way the Glock felt in my hand, so my next choice was the Walther P99 in 9mm. I couldn't find one to rent, but once I held one at a Sportsman's Warehouse, it was bliss. The grip felt like it had been molded just for my hand. I've been carrying it for over a year now, and it hasn't malfunctioned yet. I can hollow out the head of a paper target at 20 yards. My second handgun was a Ruger SP101 revolver though, so go figure.

    I wouldn't dare think I could pick out a gun for my girlfriend. I'd be happy to pay for it though

    I can't stress enough to try everything you can, and don't let people on the forums discourage you. ABSOLUTELY don't let the employees at the gun store discourage you either. Always take what they say with a hefty load of salt, and don't let them steer you to what they think are "ladies guns". YOU get what YOU want, and you won't regret it.
    The mighty oak was once a little nut who held it's ground.


  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by cherishbarnwell View Post
    Thanks for the first thing you said! My fiance asked in one of his posts what would be best for me to carry, and he said I don't want a revolver, but the replies were stuff like "she should just get over the revolver thing". Which obviously ticked me off. I'm not ruling it out, I'll try anything, I'm just not interested in it. I'm not really sure why I was afraid to shoot the glock..maybe because the guy at the pawn shop called it the "fire breathing dragon". I was scared at first to shoot his Sccy, but I finally did it and it was not bad at all. Plus the Glock would not fit my hand, it was way too big! I wouldn't have been able to hold on to it. And i'm not looking for anything without a safety due to the fact we have 3 small children. Even though yes the guns in the house are stored properly, but as a precaution I'd like to have a safety.
    Just to clarify, most semi-auto pistols have some sort of safety device. There are basically two types "active" and "passive". The "active" safety is a lever, switch, button, etc that needs to be manipulated to put the pistol into a state where it "should" fire. The "passive" safety (Glock pistols have 3 of them) are devices that should prevent the gun from firing, but sort of automatically disengage themselves in the normal course of firing the pistol. The one visible safety on the Glock pistols is the little tab on the trigger. It's designed to prevent the gun from firing if the trigger is snagged, but will be disengaged when your finger is properly placed on the trigger. There are two internal safety devices on the Glock pistols. One is a "drop safety", which should prevent the pistol from discharging if it is dropped, and the "firing pin safety" that should prevent the firing pin to move forward unless the trigger is squeezed and the other two safety devices are disengaged. I use the word "should" when talking about safety devices working because a safety is a mechanical device and can fail. You should NEVER trust the safety to prevent the pistol from firing. Safe firearm handling procedures should ALWAYS be used.

    Ultimately, YOU should be the one to decide what gun is right for you. Find a gun that you're comfortable shooting and can afford to shoot. The more range time you can get, the better off you will be. Skills can be developed if you practice (properly, but that's a whole different issue) enough.

    Revolvers aren't for everyone. It's a personal decision. They are good for many different reasons. First and foremost is that they are simple to operate. Second, they are less likely to malfunction than a semi-auto.

    Whatever your choice, there really isn't a "right" or "wrong" answer. As long as you have sound reasoning behind your choice of SD firearm, and it can do the job that you intend it to do, you made the right choice.

    I'm a firm believer that there is no such thing as a "lady's gun". This is a very common term that is highly misused. There's a gun called the "Lady Smith" that was marketed as a "lady's gun" that is commonly used by LE as a back-up firearm for men and women. I've carried on on many occasions, and I'm far from being a "lady".

    I strongly recommend shooting as many guns as you possibly can before making your decision. Whatever you do, don't let price be your primary deciding factor. There are a lot of inexpensive guns on the market that would do great for SD, OTOH, there are a few models that I would refuse to shoot.

    Happy shooting!



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  8. #7
    For what it's worth, my wife is 4'10 125lbs and uses a full size M&P Smith and Wesson chambered in 9mm.
    It has different back straps in three sizes for all size hands. She shoots very well with it using the smallest size back strap, and has become one of the best shooters at our club. As much as you don't want to hear about revolvers is about as much as I want to hear about Glock's. Make sure whatever you choose it fits you and not someone's opinion of what will fit you. Personally I am a CZ person, but I don't go telling everyone it is for them.
    Try anything and everything. If this will be your first gun, and if you have a range that you go to, ask to use or rent what you think you might like. There are a lot of new pistols out there that can be adjusted to fit, and they come in large, compact, and sub compact to boot.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Casper, Wyoming
    Posts
    52
    I'd recommend going to a range that rents guns and trying a few different models/types. One will "speak" to you.

    MWD
    Right Arm of Wyoming - RKBA rock and roll.
    http://www.rightarmofwyoming.com

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Rogers, AR
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Just to clarify, most semi-auto pistols have some sort of safety device. There are basically two types "active" and "passive". The "active" safety is a lever, switch, button, etc that needs to be manipulated to put the pistol into a state where it "should" fire. The "passive" safety (Glock pistols have 3 of them) are devices that should prevent the gun from firing, but sort of automatically disengage themselves in the normal course of firing the pistol. The one visible safety on the Glock pistols is the little tab on the trigger. It's designed to prevent the gun from firing if the trigger is snagged, but will be disengaged when your finger is properly placed on the trigger. There are two internal safety devices on the Glock pistols. One is a "drop safety", which should prevent the pistol from discharging if it is dropped, and the "firing pin safety" that should prevent the firing pin to move forward unless the trigger is squeezed and the other two safety devices are disengaged. I use the word "should" when talking about safety devices working because a safety is a mechanical device and can fail. You should NEVER trust the safety to prevent the pistol from firing. Safe firearm handling procedures should ALWAYS be used.

    Ultimately, YOU should be the one to decide what gun is right for you. Find a gun that you're comfortable shooting and can afford to shoot. The more range time you can get, the better off you will be. Skills can be developed if you practice (properly, but that's a whole different issue) enough.

    Revolvers aren't for everyone. It's a personal decision. They are good for many different reasons. First and foremost is that they are simple to operate. Second, they are less likely to malfunction than a semi-auto.

    Whatever your choice, there really isn't a "right" or "wrong" answer. As long as you have sound reasoning behind your choice of SD firearm, and it can do the job that you intend it to do, you made the right choice.

    I'm a firm believer that there is no such thing as a "lady's gun". This is a very common term that is highly misused. There's a gun called the "Lady Smith" that was marketed as a "lady's gun" that is commonly used by LE as a back-up firearm for men and women. I've carried on on many occasions, and I'm far from being a "lady".

    I strongly recommend shooting as many guns as you possibly can before making your decision. Whatever you do, don't let price be your primary deciding factor. There are a lot of inexpensive guns on the market that would do great for SD, OTOH, there are a few models that I would refuse to shoot.

    Happy shooting!



    gf
    Oops!

    Didn't mean to be so vague about safeties and the lack thereof.

    Thanks for having my back GF.
    The mighty oak was once a little nut who held it's ground.


  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    N. Central Indiana
    Posts
    512
    Buy your first handgun just like you buy shoes..... try 'em on first. Once you find what fits you , and feels "right" in your hands, you can train/learn to shoot any handgun, in any caliber. I've had students choose to carry everything from a .22 LR up to a 1911. It's your choice. Just because anybody else likes gun "A"....has absolutely no bearing on how it will feel in your hands. If it's not comfortable, or doesn't "feel right" you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it..... in that case, carry a ball bat, and save some money.
    Only when our arms are sufficient, without doubt, can we be certain, without doubt, that they will never be employed....... John F. Kennedy
    Life Member NRA Life Member Marine Corps League

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