Ruger LCP - Page 4
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 38 of 38

Thread: Ruger LCP

  1. #31
    I really like my LCP. Added the crimson trace which is a great extra and still fits my pocket holster. Just need more practice to get accustomed to the trigger pull.

  2.   
  3. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Greenville, MS
    Posts
    64
    I just bought the LASERLYTE
    SIDE MOUNT LASER FOR RUGER LCP CK-AMF MSRP $99.95

    I'm trying it out tomorrow at the range.

    Chap
    Kimber Ultra Carry II .45 ACP, 3" barrel 1911 with a Mitch Rosen holster
    XDm .45 ACP 02FEB11
    Ruger LCP .380 05FEB11

  4. I just dry fired this at the store, omfg I thought my finger would snap before it fired! Of course I'm 6'3 240 but wow my hats off to people that put hundreds of rounds through this

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Colorado / Colorado
    Posts
    246

    LCP trigger strength was done purposely

    Quote Originally Posted by Cotillion View Post
    I just dry fired this at the store, omfg I thought my finger would snap before it fired! Of course I'm 6'3 240 but wow my hats off to people that put hundreds of rounds through this
    LCP trigger strength was done purposely and is a great idea, and also a pain in the *****. It was done so that if the retention strap or coins got into the trigger, it was less likely to have a ND. Also, smaller fingers (kids) don't have the strength to activate the trigger (because of negligent storage methods).
    The problem is smaller adults and those with arthritis will have a harder time pulling a trigger with that kind of spring strength. Most women have longer and skinnier than men have, and the muscle structure on a male subject. as well as women's fingers (So I've read that women's fingers are typically skinnier and have less strength (by default)than men with bear paws instead of hands. (I hope someone appreciates my really dry humour)
    The bigger men that have mush stronger gingers might tell you that the gun is s joke. These are the same people who will tell you that they wouldn't have an "cheap plastic piece of ****** ever in my life" until they try one from 9AM until 3PM, at which point the go into the retail gun shop to trade their 500 S&W for a "cheap plastic piece of (whatever) that they originally said they would have no interest.

  6. Yeah I get the safety aspect of the long pull, it just wasn't for me. Having to keep it maintained would have been to much for me

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Colorado / Colorado
    Posts
    246
    as far as my fingers getting a little beat up on the trigger, go to Home Depot or Lowes and buy a cheap set of rubber gripping gloves for about $10.00-15.00. Make palms and finger pads are sturdy, Glass handlers gloves work best for me, with mesh on the upper portion and nitrile material on the palms. I buy them one size too small as not to have extra material that might be stuck inside the wrong place at the wrong time. These gloves protect against rubbing and chafing inside the trigger guard.
    I recently bought trigger shoes for my matching Kel-Tec P-11s. For those who don't know, trigger shoes widen the surface of the trigger to make it easier to place your finger on it. Make sure you use a heavy-duty glue (Liquid Nails, Gorilla Glue, or epoxy) to glue the shoe onto the trigger before the set screws are set into their place.
    I'm guessing that there will be a trigger shoe available soon for the Ruger LCP, as well.

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Colorado / Colorado
    Posts
    246
    Quote Originally Posted by Cotillion View Post
    Yeah I get the safety aspect of the long pull, it just wasn't for me. Having to keep it maintained would have been to much for me
    Keeping the whole gun mechanically maintained or keeping the trigger pull maintained (consistent) through the whole trigger travel?
    As far as keeping your trigger pull consistently controlled, it takes time to develop that skill. "Time" may be measured in seconds, minutes, or hours. OR time may be measured in how many rounds it takes for you to become comfortable and skilled shooting the gun.
    I needed "time" or "Trigger time" on my .22LR when I first learned to shoot. It took time and practice to graduate from that .22LR up to a .38 Spl. I had to re-learn everything on that gun. Then I had to get triggertime with a Glock 17 (9mm). That was learning yet a whole new skill-set, as the Semi-auto behaves entirely differently than a revolver. Then I went to a Glock 22 (.40 S&W)- and yes, lots of trigger time before I got used to that one. And the list goes on and on. Two identical Glock 17s, both 9mm, might have their own "individual personalities" that we don't expect them to have. Each one will have a slightly different 'attitude' with you. Why am I saying all of this? Don't let the first 5 shots determine whether you like it or not. After 500-600 shots, you still don't like the gun, then maybe it's not the right one for you.
    You wouldn't hop out of a Volkswagen Beetle and jump into a Peterbilt semi cab with a 56 foot trailer without having some sort of learning curve.
    Do you own the gun, or does the gun own you?

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Colorado / Colorado
    Posts
    246

    Re: Does the gun own me?

    Gun owns me...LOL

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast