Basic defense?
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Thread: Basic defense?

  1. #1

    Basic defense?

    Hey... so this is the first time ever looking into/considering getting a weapon. I was curious what gun would be suggested for defense of a family - someone basic that someone ranging from 22 yrs to 75 yrs old (the range of age in our household) could handle.

    This would be more for defense at home, not a concealed weapon to be carried around.

    On a second question, what kind of handgun would you suggest for personal defense that could be carried around for a novice.

    Thanks alot!

    PS - if you're going to tell me to search, I tried, but apparently the keywords I tried to use didn't work. Thus I'm posting this question.

    Thanks!

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  3. #2
    I'd buy the largest caliber, that all the people who will be using the firearm, can shoot well. AT least a 9mm, but preferably a .357, .40 S&W or .45 acp. Check out a shooting range that rents guns and see what works for you. My primary home defense/carry pistol is a Sig Sauer P229 in .40 S&W. Revolvers make an excellent choice for novice shooters (and experienced shooters, too) because they are easy to operate (just point and click). Regardless of what you choose, seek proper training. Not only on how to shoot, but when & when not to shoot.

  4. I'm thinkin' with several different users maybe a .357 revolver loaded with .38 +P hollowpoints. :icon_great:


    ALWAYS carry! ~ NEVER tell!

  5. #4

    I Agree

    Quote Originally Posted by DarrellM5 View Post
    I'd buy the largest caliber, that all the people who will be using the firearm, can shoot well. AT least a 9mm, but preferably a .357, .40 S&W or .45 acp. Check out a shooting range that rents guns and see what works for you. My primary home defense/carry pistol is a Sig Sauer P229 in .40 S&W. Revolvers make an excellent choice for novice shooters (and experienced shooters, too) because they are easy to operate (just point and click). Regardless of what you choose, seek proper training. Not only on how to shoot, but when & when not to shoot.
    I Agree. I keep a 1911 in the dresser by the bed for the wife when I'm not there and I keep a Glock 23 on me. but like DarrellM5 said get some training. There's no such thing as too much training.

  6. I doubt that all members of the household would be willing to take training or practice more than once, if at all.

    That means an easy to shoot, easy to understand firearm.

    Some will suggest pump shotguns, but pumping that sucker isn't instinctive to a non-gun person.

    Others will suggest the latest/greatest semi-auto, but again, magazine may need to be inserted, a slide may have to be cycled, a safety taken off, not to mention mastering jam clearance protocols.

    I suggest a revolver, with either a 2" or 4" barrel, caliber .38 or .357. In case you didn't know, a .357 can safely fire the gentler kicking .38's.

    Weight of the gun is important, as if it is too heavy, it'll be hard to hold for some in that house. Too light, and it'll kick like a mule.

    Size is important. Too large, it's difficult to hold properly, too small, it's difficult to hold properly and the trigger pull will be harder due to less leverage of the smaller parts.

    I'd say get an all steel snub nose (you can control or adjust fit by changing out the grips) or a medium frame with 4" barrel.

    A couple specific models that come to MY mind are: A Colt Detective Special, a S&W Model 649, or a S&W 4" Model 10 or, ideally to my mind, a S&W Model 12 with open-back Pachmayer grips. Load any of these with .38's.

    .
    Last edited by David E; 03-22-2008 at 09:46 PM.

  7. #6
    I agree. If you want to keep it simple, stick with a small to medium size revolver.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  8. What Gun To Purchase

    If you are new to shooting, and you want a gun that is easy to opearate and something you can feel confident in, I would go with a 4inch .357 magnum revolver. Is easy to opperate, basic, reliable, awesome stopping power.

    If you want to step it up to an autoloader....hands down a .45. There is no point to any other caliber for home defense. People talke about 9mm and things like "its all about shot placement". I agree on shot placement to a point. However....when you are woken up in the middle of the night, and someone is standing in your doorway and you cant see very well, you really may not get the best shot placement...I mean lets be honest...with a 9mm, you will prob. have to take 2-3 shots to take down the introder....with a 230 grain bullet coming out of a .45 1 hit between the head to waist and they are going down. Do I really have to continue? I think it speaks for itself.....
    Last edited by couger8045; 03-22-2008 at 11:46 PM.

  9. #8

    12

    12 guage pump, loaded with OO buck.

    Good chance that when someone pulls that and racks it they wont even have to use it (but whats the fun in that I guess). There is no more intimidating sound in the middle of the night.

    You mentioned that anyone should be able to use it. And I know that it has a kick. But do you think that someone will really be able to dump 5 - 10 rounds in a tango?



    For a carry gun a .40 is always a good round.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    -Austin
    -Austin

  10. Home defense perfection is the pump shotgun. If you feel that all members needing it would not be able to handle the recoil, try 20 gauge. Just remember that there are "low recoil" buckshot loads out there in 12 gauge.

    For a handgun to carry, look at the lightweight revolvers. Most people overlook them in favor of a semi-auto at first (I know I did). However, I don't think there exists an easier to carry, simpler piece of protection. What good is a handgun for protection, that you can't, or won't, carry? They aren't extremely fun to shoot, but they go bang with only a trigger. And weighing less than a pound, they are pretty easy to carry. The revolver shape seems to hide better IMO than a flat semi-auto. Just stay away from .357 Magnum in such a light revolver. I know that some prefer it, but the recoil can be too much.
    No freeman shall ever be debarred the use of arms.
    ---Thomas Jefferson: Draft Virginia Constitution, 1776.

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  11. #10

    Agree mostly...

    While I agree that a shotgun is one of the best home defense guns around, I personally load mine with Bird shot (upland game loads). And before the flaming starts, let me explain...
    Firstly, Birdshot has stopping power. Try this for yourself, take a piece of plywood at 25-30 feet and shoot it with 7-1/2 or 8 birdshot. All of the pellets go into the board and most go through. For me, this is near equal to the longest straight distance inside my home so it has enough penetrating power to really mess-up a BG.
    Second, being in a city setting I don't want missed rounds going through the walls of my house and into the houses of my neighbors. There's where the bird shot works great too. It loses a LOT of energy with distance and probably won't go through my outside walls. If it does it'll, more than likely, just bounce off the neighbors outer walls leaving nothing more than a small mark.
    What I'm trying to get at is Buck shot will penetrate TOO MUCH and I don't want to hurt anyone else in my neighborhood while trying to stop an attack inside my home.

    Ok, that's my reasoning and if there are any dissenting opinions, I'd appreciate your thoughts.
    Thanks
    JC
    John C.
    There are 10 kinds of people in the world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

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