1911 vs Glock Limp Wristing Question
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Thread: 1911 vs Glock Limp Wristing Question

  1. 1911 vs Glock Limp Wristing Question

    Afternoon all,
    Sorry if this sounds like a weird question, but here it goes. This weekend, I was camping with some 'gunny' friends on a farm and we broke out the handguns for an informal shoot. I had a Springfield EMP in 40 and a friend had a Glock Gen 4 in 40 SW (the midsize one, I forget the number). We both had UMC 180 grain ammo, and neither of us had a malfunction while shooting our own guns. Midway through, we switched, and my friend started having failure to extract issued with my EMP. Once I was driving the pistol again, no malfunctions... My EMP has been extremely reliable for me with about a dozen plinking and self defense loads, and it had ZERO stoppages while I was driving the pistol yesterday. This guy is a tall and strong dude, so if he was limp wristing, it probably wasn't bad. Assuming the problem was limp wristing, any ideas what it is about a Glock that makes them less susceptible to stoppages from a poor grip? This is the first time I've seen first hand reliability problems caused by the operator. In case anyone suspects the ammo, I've got about 200 rounds of the same lot through this gun with no stoppages until he shot it yesterday.

    By the way, I've never been a fan of the Glocks, but the Gen 4 seems to have solved a lot of the personal 'fit' problems Ive had with other Glocks, and the trigger was better than tolerable for this 1911 fan.

    Take care!

    -bnw

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  3. #2
    Answer to mid size .40 question, glock 23. Be warned, you are about to be assimilated.
    Typos are for the entertainment of the reader. Don't let it go to your head!

  4. #3
    I know guys that lift weights and are very strong but have a weak handshake. It's not that they can't clamp down, they just don't. Everybody is different. I know some that grip a gun as tight as they can which is a problem as well. The Glock's polymer frame flexes each shoot, the recoil spring design and the weight of the slide combination make it more forgiving. Most people can shoot a Glock with out problems. They are designed to run. Going from one gun to another, for most people, does take a little getting use to the gun (grip, trigger pull, sights,...).

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanJ View Post
    I know guys that lift weights and are very strong but have a weak handshake. It's not that they can't clamp down, they just don't. Everybody is different. I know some that grip a gun as tight as they can which is a problem as well. The Glock's polymer frame flexes each shoot, the recoil spring design and the weight of the slide combination make it more forgiving. Most people can shoot a Glock with out problems. They are designed to run. Going from one gun to another, for most people, does take a little getting use to the gun (grip, trigger pull, sights,...).
    I'm pretty into working out ...unless the person is specifically working out the grip strength and forearm, they can be plenty strong everywhere else and have a weak grip. Most guys at the gym don't focus on the grip, forearms or calves....mostly chest, biceps, and thighs ... They don't realize it's the core and back that really drives strength. And the little things that help build strength along the way ie: grip , calves , forearms etc
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. Massad Ayoob's tips for shooting semis well includes grasping the gun very hard. Hard enough to cause some mild tremor. He says not to worry about the tremor, the round will impact close to the POA. I grip my XD-S hard enough to cause tremor, then back off until it stops. I use those hand springs for grip strength, and curl bar as well. I've had one high primer strike with failure to fire, 'cause I nearly dropped the pistol on the previous round (hundreds of rounds tired my grip), and caused an out of battery condition.

    Hand and arm strength can't be stressed enough. I use a modified weaver for paper punching with locked strong arm and bent weak arm. This seems to send the recoil to my shoulder, and coupled with a gorilla grip, I can get on target faster. YMMV.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    3,832
    I was going to ask the question "What's his handshake like?" which is similar to where DanJ was going.

    I've known strong guys with weak handshakes and small guys with iron grip strength.

    I was told when going through a LE firearm course, grip the gun until you just start to shake and then ease off until you don't. At this point you have the grip strength you need. You may want to try this with your friend so he has an idea of what type of grip strength is needed.

    To answer another query, the midsize .40 cal glock is the G23.

    As to why he had FTE with yours and not his, I'd have to see him firing to make an intelligent suggestion.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

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