Seeking Opinions on Taurus and SCCY
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Thread: Seeking Opinions on Taurus and SCCY

  1. Seeking Opinions on Taurus and SCCY

    My wife and I will be getting our Concealed Carry License's soon and are shopping for appropriate handguns. I want to keep costs down, but still have a reliable weapon. My research suggests that Taurus and SCCY are the best bets for price, quality, concealability, and reliability. Or, have I just convinced myself that because I'm cheap?

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  3. #2
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    A friend of mine bought a SCCY and he likes it. He had a problem with it about a week into owning it. He sent it back on a Friday and SCCY sent it back on the following monday. They are inexpensive and have a pretty good warranty.

    Sent from my SM-T320 using Tapatalk

  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RolandD View Post
    My wife and I will be getting our Concealed Carry License's soon and are shopping for appropriate handguns. I want to keep costs down, but still have a reliable weapon. My research suggests that Taurus and SCCY are the best bets for price, quality, concealability, and reliability. Or, have I just convinced myself that because I'm cheap?
    Posts like these always worry me, for multiple reasons.

    You can really keep your costs down by not buying a gun at all. Think about all the money you save. You are planning to buy a life saving device. What's your life and your wife's life worth to you? $300 for a SCCY or $550 for a proven service weapon that millions of people, including law enforcement officers, rely on daily? You are trying to save $250/gun or $500 in total. Why? If you really live paycheck-to-paycheck and can only save little every month, I understand. Otherwise, plan ahead, save accordingly, and buy once/cry once.

    Now comes the real question. Did you plan a budget for accessories (e.g. holster), training and self defense ammunition, a training class, and regular practice? Again, if you really live paycheck-to-paycheck and can only save little every month, I understand. Otherwise, plan ahead, save accordingly, and then train, practice and carry your firearm with quality equipment. Two quality holsters, 200 rounds of self defense ammunition, 1,000 rounds of practice ammunition, a cleaning kit, and a training class for two persons can easily cost $700.

    I carry a Glock 19. Glock firearms are reliable in adverse conditions and with high round counts. Mine has over 10,000 rounds through it and I trained with it in muddy conditions just last weekend. 9mm Glocks tend to have the least amount of wear and tear. All internal OEM components that might wear out, such as springs, are easily replaceable and available on the market. A used Glock 19 may be an option if you want to save money. Smith & Wesson M&P 9c or Shield is another option.

    This is only my opinion. You have to make up your own mind. Feel free to ask questions.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    Posts like these always worry me, for multiple reasons.

    You can really keep your costs down by not buying a gun at all. Think about all the money you save. You are planning to buy a life saving device. What's your life and your wife's life worth to you? $300 for a SCCY or $550 for a proven service weapon that millions of people, including law enforcement officers, rely on daily? You are trying to save $250/gun or $500 in total. Why? If you really live paycheck-to-paycheck and can only save little every month, I understand. Otherwise, plan ahead, save accordingly, and buy once/cry once.

    Now comes the real question. Did you plan a budget for accessories (e.g. holster), training and self defense ammunition, a training class, and regular practice? Again, if you really live paycheck-to-paycheck and can only save little every month, I understand. Otherwise, plan ahead, save accordingly, and then train, practice and carry your firearm with quality equipment. Two quality holsters, 200 rounds of self defense ammunition, 1,000 rounds of practice ammunition, a cleaning kit, and a training class for two persons can easily cost $700.

    I carry a Glock 19. Glock firearms are reliable in adverse conditions and with high round counts. Mine has over 10,000 rounds through it and I trained with it in muddy conditions just last weekend. 9mm Glocks tend to have the least amount of wear and tear. All internal OEM components that might wear out, such as springs, are easily replaceable and available on the market. A used Glock 19 may be an option if you want to save money. Smith & Wesson M&P 9c or Shield is another option.

    This is only my opinion. You have to make up your own mind. Feel free to ask questions.
    I'm sorry, you must have misunderstood my post. Have you fired any Taurus' or SCCY handguns? I wanted experienced opinions, but I received a lecture with no useful information. If you aren't a priggish gun snob I apologize.

  6. #5
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    Like bofh said, "What's your life and your wife's life worth to you?" Don't go cheap!
    COMFORT ONE ANOTHER WITH THESE WORDS ALSO...THERE WILL NOT BE ANOTHER GENERATION
    ~ The Fig Tree Prophecy -1948 -2028 ~

  7. #6
    Taurus has had a lot of issues lately with their firearms. Big shake up in the company management too.

    SCCY is a new company trying to make their mark in the industry. Their warranty is second to none.

    I have owned Taurus revolvers & currently have 2 PT 92's. ( Wonderful weapons.)

    I have no experience with SCCY personally, but if I were in your position, everything considered, I would buy the SCCY.
    I plan on adding at least one to my collection soon.

    Buy what you like & can afford. Any gun in your hand is better than a cell phone. Not everyone can afford to buy an Ed Brown.
    ΥΣΜΧ SEMPER FIDELIS !!!

    57 AND COUNTING

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RolandD View Post
    I'm sorry, you must have misunderstood my post. Have you fired any Taurus' or SCCY handguns? I wanted experienced opinions, but I received a lecture with no useful information. If you aren't a priggish gun snob I apologize.
    You did get an opinion, just not the one you wanted. There was useful information in my post. You just didn't like it.

    There are tons of reviews (including videos) on the internet, where a person takes a Taurus or SCCY to a range and test fires it. The conclusion is, they seem to work. Does that mean that they are good guns? No. I have been to a number of training classes, where I have seen guns fail. If they can fail in a training class, then they can fail in real life too. Taking a clean gun to a gun range and shooting 50-100 rounds through is not a reliability test. It is a basic function test. I expect a product sold as new to pass a basic function test. A training class typically involves firing 300-600 rounds in a day through a gun without cleaning it, often in adverse conditions. Major gun malfunctions that render it unusable often result from the gun seizing up due to dirt. Other malfunctions include broken parts, especially springs and magazines, due to wear and tear over time.

    You get what you pay for. That was the essence of my post. If the difference between a cheap and a battle-proven gun is $250, why go for the cheap gun if you can afford the battle-proven gun with some planning? If you plan to never seriously train, then a Taurus or SCCY is perfect for you. Otherwise, expect a cheap gun to work for the first months or even year and then run into problems. If the gun stops to work when you actually defend your life with it, then that's the end of your story. Otherwise, once you run into problems, availability of replacement parts is essential. It can take weeks or even months to get a firearm repaired with the original manufacturer, if replacement parts are only available via the original manufacturer. With Glocks, you can stock up on replacement parts and even repair the gun at the range. Been there, done that.

    FYI: I do have a Taurus TCP 738 .380 ACP mouse gun. I really liked it when I bought it and carried it. I stopped carrying it for a number of reasons. I did take it to the range last weekend as well and experienced a number of failure to eject malfunctions, every 2-3 fired rounds! This appears to be a combination of ammunition and gun. My Hornady XTP self defense ammo and my Monarch training ammo cycles fine, for now, but my Remington UMC training ammo apparently doesn't. I have about 2500 rounds through that gun. I don't recommend it for a number of reasons.

    Note that you didn't specify a model, rather focused only on a manufacturer. Once you select a specific model, you need to investigate that particular model. Some handguns work great, some don't. Most cheap handguns are picky with ammunition.

    Again, this is only my opinion. You have to make up your own mind. Feel free to ask questions.

  9. FYI: I do have a Taurus TCP 738 .380 ACP mouse gun. I really liked it when I bought it and carried it. I stopped carrying it for a number of reasons. I did take it to the range last weekend as well and experienced a number of failure to eject malfunctions, every 2-3 fired rounds! This appears to be a combination of ammunition and gun. My Hornady XTP self defense ammo and my Monarch training ammo cycles fine, for now, but my Remington UMC training ammo apparently doesn't. I have about 2500 rounds through that gun. I don't recommend it for a number of reasons.
    I have been looking at the TCP for my wife and possibly for my daughters to carry. What are the number of reasons you don't recommend the TCP?

    I am considering the following pocket .380s for my wife:
    Beretta Pico
    Ruger LCP
    Taurus TCP
    S&W Bodyguard
    Colt Mustang XSP
    Kahr CT380
    Kahr CW380
    Diamondback DB380
    Glock 42
    SCCY CPX-3 (if it ever makes it to market)

    In 9mm, I am considering the folowing for myself and possibly my wife if she likes and can fire them:
    SCCY CPX-2
    Taurus 709
    Ruger LC9s
    Beretta Nano
    S&W MP Shield
    Glock 43

    We will be going to a local range that rents guns and will be able to fire most, but not all, of these.

    The statement "How much is your life worth?" is BS and pretentious. Why should I pay $500 or up if I can pay half that and get a reliable handgun. "You get what you pay for" is the same. I'm currently driving a well cared for older Mercedes. It has just as many issues as the average car that cost half as much new. Except that it costs twice as much to get things fixed. I have been to the gun specific forums and have read just as many horror stories about the Glocks and S&Ws as I found for the Taurus and Sccy's. The one thing that I did find different was the customer service and warranty stories. Taurus and SCCY appear to take care of problems much more promptly and with less hassle than any other manufacturer that I read about. If you don't like Taurus, or you don't like SCCY, then tell me about your experience with them and why. But don't just put them down because they cost less.

  10. Taurus has had a lot of issues lately with their firearms. Big shake up in the company management too.
    Missoak, your referring to the issue with their striker fired guns going off when dropped or handled roughly? What the shake up in management?

  11. #10
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    I generally don't recommend a .380 ACP mouse gun. Yes, there are "cute" and easily concealable, but that's where it ends. .380 ACP is a weak cartridge that generally underperforms with JHP ammunition. Some people carry FMJ-FN or Xtreme Penetrator .380 ACP rounds because of that. Mouse guns have a small sight radius making quick and accurate shots at distances difficult. It also makes hitting a moving target difficult, as well as, shooting while moving. Mouse guns have also low capacity. Their recoil is significantly higher and more difficult to manage than anything of larger size.

    As for the TCP, mine worked perfectly out of the box and until now, but I have seen numerous ones that didn't. These were typically the same failure-to-eject malfunctions that I saw last weekend. I assume that this is a failure of the ejector spring or claw. Also, manually cycling JHP ammunition out of the gun requires to operate the slide with force to emulate a similar speed as when it fires. Slowly moving the slide backwards to eject JHP ammunition out of the gun will end up with the round stuck between the barrel and the slide, requiring disassembly. The TCP doesn't have real sights. My TCP is heavily modified with a better trigger, a +1 magazine extension (not sold anymore), traction grip overlays, a Crimson Trace Laser, and glue-on reflective dots that make the completely black sights a three-dot sight. The laser alone is more expensive than the gun.

    As I mentioned in my first post: posts like these always worry me, for multiple reasons. There is a reason why I recommended the Glock 19, S&W M&P 9c and S&W M&P Shield, because I know that these guns have been proven to be reliable in practice. I haven't heard anything similar about SCCY or Taurus handguns, because no-one brings them to the training classes I and others attend. Students come mostly with Glocks, M&Ps, XDs, 1911s, and Sigs. It is my personal opinion that saving the most amount of money shouldn't be an objective when buying a gun. I realize that the SCCY CPX-2 costs $270 and the Glock 19 Gen 4 costs $550, both with 3 magazines, both online prices. Yes, you can buy 2 SCCY CPX-2 for the price of one Glock 19 Gen 4, if that is your objective. I, however, took the advice of my friends, several retired police officers and several retired Marines, put my Taurus TCP away and carry the Glock 19. (Note that some of them still try to convince me to carry a quality 1911.)

    It looks like the SCCY CPX-2 could actually be quite reliable: SCCY CPX-2 Torture Test. This test, however, does not say much about long-term reliability. The 9 pound trigger pull would be a non-starter with me though. I think your plan to go to a local range and rent guns is the best choice.

    For the .380 ACP caliber war, go to this thread: http://www.usacarry.com/forums/conce...nough-gun.html.

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