Deciding between Ruger LC9s, Ruger SC40 or Beretta PX4 Storm Sub Compact for conceal
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Thread: Deciding between Ruger LC9s, Ruger SC40 or Beretta PX4 Storm Sub Compact for conceal

  1. #1

    Deciding between Ruger LC9s, Ruger SC40 or Beretta PX4 Storm Sub Compact for conceal

    Stuck between those three for conceal carry. I already have a full size PX4 in a 40 but because of its size, conceal carry on me is out of the question with this gun. Tried it the other day with an Alien Gear 3.0 IWB holster and it just didn't work out.

    I haven't got to handle the little beretta yet, hopefully get to this weekend at a big bass pro I'll be going to but I have handled the two Rugers. They're nice guns. I just don't know if I want a 9mm with a small number of rounds compared to the other two with larger capacities plus larger ammo.

    I realize the lc9 is a single stack but since I'm thinking the combination of all that extra pistol mass and holster mass of my full size that was between me and my jeans, I really don't think the increased width of a much smaller double stack pistol is gonna make much difference from a smaller single stack pistol.

    Anybody daily conceal carry either of these three pistols? Pros? Cons?

    Thanks.


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  3. #2
    Oh and to clarify, the 40 S&W sub compact Storm is the one I'm lookin into. The 9mm version of it has been considered as well, I'm just leaning more towards the 40.


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  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    TN
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    4,255
    I don't carry any of these firearms, but I can offer some general advice.

    Look up reviews. I don't mean promotional pieces that talk about the various features of the firearm you are looking at, but actual reports from owners that fired thousands of rounds through their firearm and have taken it to training classes. There are a number of YouTube channels and blogs of individual gun owners that can give you honest feedback.

    There are two types of firearms, those that last and those that break down quickly. Don't get me wrong all firearms break down eventually, but some already show serious wear after one or two thousand rounds or after being used in a training class or two. For example, plastic sights tend to break. Springs and levers made from cheap metal wear out very quickly. The biggest issue is with outright design flaws. I am not talking about firearms that are inoperable from the get go, but rather firearms that have design features that are inherently less reliable. Malfunctions, such as failure to feed or failure to extract, start happening when these firearms are operated in less than ideal conditions, such as slightly dirty and in rain. Prime examples are compact 1911s chambered in .45 ACP.

    Another thing to look at is serviceability. If something fails in the firearm, how easy is it to replace it. How easy is it to get replacement parts and at what cost. How easy is it to detail strip the firearm. Can you do it by yourself or do you need a gunsmith for replacing springs and levers.

    Next up is the manual of arms. There are different schools of thought when it comes to external safeties, including thumb safeties and backstrap safeties. Without going into a long argument about external safeties, handguns with a light and short trigger travel, like 1911s, should have them. For all other handgun types, they are optional and not really needed. In any case, you will end up with multiple handguns for different uses. It is best to keep a consistent manual of arms, i.e., consistency in external safeties across your handguns. Similarly, you should also look for consistency in action types and not mix single-action, single-action/double-action and double-action only handguns. The goal here is that no-matter what firearm you pick up, you are very familiar with its operation and have trained with this particular firearm or a similar firearm extensively. Many manufacturers produce lineups that include different sizes of the same design, Take advantage of that. In some cases, the smaller model may even fit in the same holster as the bigger one.

    Try to stay with the same caliber, unless you have an actual practical need to use a different one. For example, have one caliber for carrying in the street for 2-legged threats and one for carrying in the woods for 4-legged threats. The idea here is that you can stock up self defense rounds and target rounds on those calibers without creating an expensive mess.

    Go to a range that rents firearms and test them out. Once you have bought one, take a defensive handgun training class with it not only to train the basics on how and when to use the firearm, but also to figure out if your gun, holster and backup magazines work for you.

    My personal good to go list includes: Most Glocks, S&W M&P Shield, S&W M&P 9c and 40c, Sig Sauer P320 and a few others.

    I have fired now about 13,000 rounds through my Glock 19, about 7,500 rounds through my Glock 26 and about 5,500 rounds through my Glock 20. These are all estimates. I have taken these firearms through several multi-day training classes. I had the following malfunctions in these about 26,000 rounds fired:

    • Unnecessary "improvement": I replaced the safety plunger in the Glock 19 with a Titanium safety plunger. This changed the timing of the safety plunger in correlation to the striker and resulted in a single light primer strike. I subsequently removed the unnecessary "improvement".
    • Operator error: I am right handed. During a training exercise with the Glock 19, we were supposed to hold the gun left handed, using the right hand as a support hand. Instead of the thumbs-forward grip, I did the thumbs-over-thumbs (revolver) grip. This resulted in the slide bumping into my thumb when cycling and a single failure to extract.
    • Unnecessary "improvement": During practice with the Glock 20 and hot 10mm loads, the magazine fell out several times while firing. I traced this down to the Vickers extended magazine release that I installed and accidentally pushed inward while trying to hold on to the gun. I subsequently removed the unnecessary "improvement".
    • Unnecessary "improvement": Also during practice with the Glock 20 and hot 10mm loads, the slide locked open on a non-empty magazine several times. I traced this down to the Glock extended slide stop lever that I installed and accidentally pushed up while trying to hold on to the gun. I subsequently removed the unnecessary "improvement".
    • Wear out: Also during practice with the Glock 20 and hot 10mm loads, I had failures to feed. I traced this down to a worn-out recoil spring (5000-round service interval, requiring replacement). I replaced it and it works fine again.

    You should be looking for this type of report for the firearms you are considering. Sorry for the long post.

  5. #4
    That's why I'm leaning more toward the Beretta because it's basically the same in the way that it operates to my big beretta.

    I do like the way the safety works on the two Rugers. Up is on and down is fire. The opposite from the Storm. Plus, I don't know if it's the size and shape of the safety on the Rugers or if it's that and where it's located but, when I was tryin those two out in an IWB holster, it's like my thumb knew right where it was at and without having thinking about I had the safety off as soon as I had the gun out of the holster so, that was a plus.


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  6. #5
    I can't speak to the Ruger SR40C but I do have a SR9C. It's a gem and shoots softly, very accurate and no problems so far.



    The Taurus is a recent purchase and I haven't had a chance to fire it yet. Academy had it on sale, paired with a Heritage .22 single action for $299. At first I figured the Taurus must be inferior to be so cheap but there were several glowing reports on the Internet and those Heritage single actions are great for use around our horse barn. Now I have three of the Heritages.
    USAF 1958-62
    NRA Member since the 1950's
    FL CCW

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Danwin22 View Post
    I can't speak to the Ruger SR40C but I do have a SR9C. It's a gem and shoots softly, very accurate and no problems so far.
    Do you ever conceal carry your SR9C? I'm pretty sure the 9 and 40 SR's are the same overall size.
    The Taurus is a recent purchase and I haven't had a chance to fire it yet. Academy had it on sale, paired with a Heritage .22 single action for $299. At first I figured the Taurus must be inferior to be so cheap but there were several glowing reports on the Internet and those Heritage single actions are great for use around our horse barn. Now I have three of the Heritages.
    Which model Taurus is the semi? A buddy of mine has the Slim 9mm and he loves his. My mom has a snub Taurus 605 357 j frame that she raves over.


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  8. #7
    Finally got to wrap my hands around the sub compact storm today. Nice little gun but I'm afraid it's gonna be a little big tho. Didn't try it in a good holster though, all they had was just a little cheapie neoprene holster that goes in the inside of your waistband.

    Didn't really fit well in my shorts pocket as good as I'd hoped as well.

    Might just get the little LC9s and call it good.


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  9. #8
    Yes, the SR9c is exactly the same size as the SR40c. I bought my SR9c in 2010 and it will be my CCW. I just received my CCW License about a week ago and haven't gone anywhere to carry yet. My holster is a Milt Sparks OWB that was fit to a Walther P-99 but fits my Ruger perfectly.

    The Taurus is a PT111 Millennium G2 that came with two 12-round mags. Seems like a solid gun but I won't know until I rack up several boxes of ammo through it.

    I normally spend my mornings working around the barn and horses so "Open Carry" would be a better option for me. I think that if Open Carry ever gets passed here in Florida you'll probably need a CCW to do it. If Hillary gets elected we may not be able to easily obtain a CCW in the future.

    Last week after going to the barn to feed horses I had to go to the chiropractor twice and had three visits to medical offices for my wife. Every medical place seems to have a NO FIREARMS sign.

    My main threats to the horses are rattlesnakes, coyotes and black bears. For some reason Seminole county seems to have more than it's share of black bears but I've never seen on our property. The guy with the next horse barn has killed thirteen coyotes in the past year or so.

    Our quarter horse chases coyotes but they look at the mini horse and lick their chops. I keep a 30-30 Winchester 94 handy for the animals and a .22 single action for snakes. With open carry I could wear my .22 hog leg and not worry about a cop coming along when I'm standing in the road repairing a fence board. A .357 single action with 5.5" or 6.5" barrel would probably be the best one gun solution for me because coyotes don't get very close.





    USAF 1958-62
    NRA Member since the 1950's
    FL CCW

  10. #9
    Join Date
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    Sin City....Las Vegas
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    [QUOTE=corneileous;606022]Finally got to wrap my hands around the sub compact storm today. Nice little gun but I'm afraid it's gonna be a little big tho. Didn't try it in a good holster though, all they had was just a little cheapie neoprene holster that goes in the inside of your waistband.

    Didn't really fit well in my shorts pocket as good as I'd hoped as well.

    Might just get the little LC9s and call it good.


    Not trying to persuade you or anything....BUT have you considered the Glock 43? I love my Ruger LC9s but must admit it sometimes gets treated like a stepkid since I bought my 43 which is strictly my carry gun these days.
    NOT like the OTHER girls!!!!

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by vegas girl View Post
    Not trying to persuade you or anything....BUT have you considered the Glock 43? I love my Ruger LC9s but must admit it sometimes gets treated like a stepkid since I bought my 43 which is strictly my carry gun these days.
    Haven't considered a Glock. Not puttin' them down or nothin', I just don't like the idea of only relying just on a trigger safety.

    There's plenty of other guns I'd like to consider but since the safety is only in the trigger, they either have too long, too hard or both of a trigger pull.

    I stopped at another place yesterday and got to check out that little Beretta Nano 9mm. Nice little pistol just like I had figured it was but, no saftey.

    I'm just curious though, what is it about your Glock that makes it your primary carry over the Ruger?


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