Dry Firing...Yes or No - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: Dry Firing...Yes or No

  1. #21
    I read the instruction manuals to my firearms, and I haven't owned a firearm yet that says dry firing is unacceptable. Every single firearm I own, it is stated in the manual that you CAN in fact dry fire the weapon, one even mentions dry firing to become "comfortable" with the weapon.
    Gun control: Forcing a 95lb woman to fist fight a 300lb rapist

  2.   
  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by jchantelau View Post
    You gotta dry fire a glock in order to field strip it.
    Just don't do like that DEA agent did in the class room.
    Big Gay Al: Big Gay Al's Big Gay (Gun) Blog
    An unarmed person speaking of the benefits of gun control is like a
    eunuch speaking about the benefits of sexual abstinence.

  4. #23
    Jim Casada, author of "The Marksmanship Primer", highly recommends dry firing as a way to increase accuracy. Before reading his book I always thought it was damaging to the guns but after much research decided to add it to my practice schedule. It does help immensely and I have been unable to find any harm to the firearms.

  5. #24
    While in general, I agree, with most modern firearms, dry firing is OK, there are some exceptions. The CZ-52 being one of them.
    Big Gay Al: Big Gay Al's Big Gay (Gun) Blog
    An unarmed person speaking of the benefits of gun control is like a
    eunuch speaking about the benefits of sexual abstinence.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    17

    Question

    I'm not real clear on this, but here's my understanding:

    Guns with conventional hammers can be dry-fired without harming the gun. It's less clear with striker-fired guns. Apparently some say OK, some say don't.

    My GF has a Taurus PT 24/7 Pro. If you actually read the entire manual, you can find one sentence that says that dry-firing is not recommended. It's a striker gun. She dry fires it all the time, though. So far, she hasn't done it much, and I haven't said anything about it, because the jury's still out on how "bad" it is.

    I've seen snap caps, but don't really understand how they work or how they're supposed to be used. Can someone elaborate on this or point me to where this is explained?

    It looks like you can "fire" snap caps many times before they're "worn out". Dunno. Do you load your magazine with them and cycle them manually by racking the slide after each practice fire? They sure seem to be a PITA that discourages practice.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by Bullitt View Post
    I'm not real clear on this, but here's my understanding:

    Guns with conventional hammers can be dry-fired without harming the gun. It's less clear with striker-fired guns. Apparently some say OK, some say don't.

    My GF has a Taurus PT 24/7 Pro. If you actually read the entire manual, you can find one sentence that says that dry-firing is not recommended. It's a striker gun. She dry fires it all the time, though. So far, she hasn't done it much, and I haven't said anything about it, because the jury's still out on how "bad" it is.

    I've seen snap caps, but don't really understand how they work or how they're supposed to be used. Can someone elaborate on this or point me to where this is explained?

    It looks like you can "fire" snap caps many times before they're "worn out". Dunno. Do you load your magazine with them and cycle them manually by racking the slide after each practice fire? They sure seem to be a PITA that discourages practice.

    This is a good reason for me to NOT purchase a Taurus semi-auto. Glocks, Sigs, S&W M&P, Sringfield Armory XDs' are all "striker guns" and can all be safely dry fired. The only modern firearms I've been cautioned about dry firing are the 1911 Race Guns.

    When in doubt, check with the manufacturer. Never admit that you did something that their manual cautions against. Read the manual and if you're still in doubt, contact the manufacturer. Best method of contact would be by email if possible. This way you'll have written documentation as to what's safe to do with your firearm. Should you have the need to take legal action, you'll have some type of written proof.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  8. Dry Firing

    Good point, GF. It would be a lot better in the event of an injury to have documentary proof, rather than the memory of a phone conversation. As we had drummed into us in the academy, the palest of inks is stronger than the best memory. Keep up the good work.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast