Dry Firing...Yes or No
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Thread: Dry Firing...Yes or No

  1. #1

    Dry Firing...Yes or No

    I have heard some say that dry firing is bad for the gun. I can see the problem for a rim fire. But, I don't see the problem with dry firing a center fire gun.

    Am I overlooking something?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    There isn't. It isn't a bad practice to use snap caps though.
    Know the law; don't ask, don't tell.
    NRA & UT Certified Instructor; CT, FL, NH, NV, OR, PA & UT CCW Holder
    Happy new 1984; 25 years behind schedule. Send lawyers, guns and money...the SHTF...

  4. #3
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    I've been told center fire is ok but rimfire isn't. When I first attended Front Sight that is one of the first questions I asked. I've been dry firing ever since.


    Memberships: NRA, GOA, USCCA
    Guns: Glock 26, Ruger LCP, Beretta 90-Two .40, Beretta PX4 Storm Subcompact 9MM, Beretta Tomcat, Bushmaster Patrolman M4

  5. #4
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    Never dry fire any rimfire firearm. Some center fire manufactures don't recommend dry firing. I know Kel-Tec doesn't. The best thing to do is read the manual and see if it's recommended or not. I dry fire about 98% of my firearms a little. I prefer live fire...
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

  6. #5
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    I do have snapcaps but I never use them.


    Memberships: NRA, GOA, USCCA
    Guns: Glock 26, Ruger LCP, Beretta 90-Two .40, Beretta PX4 Storm Subcompact 9MM, Beretta Tomcat, Bushmaster Patrolman M4

  7. #6
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    + 1 on the snap caps. Then you don't have to worry. Every time I have bought a new caliber weapon, a pack of matching snap caps is on top of the inevitable 200 rounds of ammunition on the counter. Dry fire is great practice for home defense scenario training.
    "The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government." Thomas Jefferson

  8. #7
    Now that's a good thing to know. I guess that I always thought it was that way ,but I was never really sure.
    [/SIGPIC]
    Bagger Jim
    It's your right to protect youself..

  9. #8
    Depends a lot on the firearm. Older ones (i.e., those made before 1960 something) I would recommend against, unless you have snap caps. Also, it is usually recommended against dry-firing a CZ-52. Unless you have extra firing pins, or unless you have snap caps.
    Big Gay Al: Big Gay Al's Big Gay (Gun) Blog
    An unarmed person speaking of the benefits of gun control is like a
    eunuch speaking about the benefits of sexual abstinence.

  10. #9
    I dry fire about everyday. it's a good way to see if you are pulling or pushing the trigger left or right as you fire. ccw instructors I had highly recommend dry firing.
    You can have my freedom as soon as I'm done with it!!!

  11. #10
    Join Date
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    I don't dry fire without snap caps ..... centerfire, or rimfire. This is simply how I look at it.......

    A firing pin has a functional distance of travel. If the firing pin is an intregal part of the hammer, and does not impact a cartridge case, another part of the hammer, or firing pin block receives the impact. If the firing pin floats, and does not strike a cartridge case, a shoulder on the firing pin, or another stop device must prevent firing pin from extended travel. If the shoulder or stop device is designed to allow dry firing, hooray, and the manual should say so. I tend to protect my firing pins from hammering against their respective stops.

    Dry firing is an excellent parctice tool, but I just prefer to use snap caps, as I think it's easier on the firing pins. I"m not saying that anyone else should. Y'all suit yerselves....
    Last edited by Jay; 02-04-2009 at 10:06 AM.
    Only when our arms are sufficient, without doubt, can we be certain, without doubt, that they will never be employed....... John F. Kennedy
    Life Member NRA Life Member Marine Corps League

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