Worst gun of all time - Page 5
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Thread: Worst gun of all time

  1. #41
    Llama .22. Looks like a 1911 to a tee! The gun jams, stove pipes, fails to feed, fails to eject...just one big failure. Tried all kinds of ammo in it. I've pulled it out of the safe a few times with the intent to do some polishing of the feed ramp and making some adjustments to see if I can get it to cycle correctly, but then I get side tracked with other projects. One of these days..I'll get it running right.

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  3. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Confess View Post
    The first handgun I ever bought was a Jennings nine. What a piece that was. I should have known better than to buy a 100$ gun I knew nothing about. But then I was even younger and dumber than I am now. I doubt I put 500 rounds through it before it I gave up on it. I traded it for a Mossberg 500 and never regretted it.
    My Uncle gave me a Jennings Nine. I was confused because He didn't like me much (because of problems between my Dad and my Dad's sister, his wife). I then became ecstatic because I though that the family was starting to heal. Nope, second worst gun I've ever had my hands on. it might shoot 2 rounds out of the magazine without help. Might, pawned it for $50 and I think I got the better deal.

    The worst gun I've even had my hands on (so far) was a .22LR revolver that a friend had, He had just bought it for $25. I looked it over and I couldn't find a brand name, only "Cambered for .22LR only" and "Made in China". It was black with White plastic grips, single action, resembled a Ruger Single-Six, except it felt like a cap pistol, real light compared to the Ruger. I told him that I wouldn't shoot it and I didn't think that he should either. He loaded it and on the first shot the gun blew apart. It broke the top strap and the lower frame in-front of the trigger guard. I'd never see a .22LR blow apart until then. After it came apart, I found out why. The thing was made of pot metal! He wasn't hurt and I told him that he paid too much. Only good thing, he had hit the bull's eye on the target. At least the one shot he got was right on the nose.

  4. #43
    Worst ever was a PT22 my brother had. 1st shot the barrel popped up on it's own. I looked at it & figured he hadn't secured it. I took a shot with it & it came apart in my hand. Scary to say the least.After a bunch of ****** from Taurus, he traded it in for half of what he paid.

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by stumpjumper101 View Post
    yup skyy arms clone of a keltec with a safety. from the first shot fired the safety would go safe after every shot. contacted the company and they sent a safety kit. thought that would be an upgrade. nope same thing still fails. works well in paper weight mode though
    Saw a guy with a Skyy. Never heard of it before. He shot it ok at a meet I was watching. I forgot that I meant to look that brand up on the net just so see what it was.
    I don't know all that much about this stuff but it amazes me that there are so many cheap guns out there. It amazes me even more that people buy these instead or tried and true brands. Yes I read about the problems with one posters Sig and another about a Glock. Those are the exceptions rather then the rule with off brands. I hope guys are buying those cheap guns just to try them out and see if they get a bargain and actually work and not to protect their lives and loved ones. The guy with the Skyy uses it as his regular carry. I am not a snob, maybe a bit dense but buying these type of guns sure confuses me!
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  6. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by G50AE View Post
    I am not surprised to see the Lorcin and 1911 copies mentioned multiple times. I am surprised to see Sig, Glock and Beretta mentioned as they typically all make good firearms. I am also surprised that noone has mentioned the Browning High Power or any of High-Point's pistols.
    This is more correct.

    I'm gonna defend the 1911 a little bit. The 1911 is a design, drawn up by John Moses Browning. When done right it is as good as anything out there. The problem is, to make it right today costs a good bit of money (remember, the design turned 100 years old this year). Everyone is trying to find a cheaper way to do it and, while some have (Remington, the recent SA guns, Para, and hopefully Ruger), many have failed miserably at it (Charles Daly, Llama, AMT, and Auto-Ordnance). Then there are the companies that put a lot of money into them and charge accordingly (Wilson, Nighthawk Custom, Les Baer). The other issue is that it was designed around hardball ammo. Making it work with modern SD ammo can be a little hairy but it can be done.

    The reason you don't hear about the Hi-power is probably because it is a good design and hasn't really been cloned very much. It's also not as popular as the 1911 for some reason.

    Some who have Hi-points actually have had good luck. The rest are probably embarressed to say they own one. :D

  7. Quote Originally Posted by CapGun View Post
    Saw a guy with a Skyy. Never heard of it before. He shot it ok at a meet I was watching. I forgot that I meant to look that brand up on the net just so see what it was.
    I don't know all that much about this stuff but it amazes me that there are so many cheap guns out there. It amazes me even more that people buy these instead or tried and true brands. Yes I read about the problems with one posters Sig and another about a Glock. Those are the exceptions rather then the rule with off brands. I hope guys are buying those cheap guns just to try them out and see if they get a bargain and actually work and not to protect their lives and loved ones. The guy with the Skyy uses it as his regular carry. I am not a snob, maybe a bit dense but buying these type of guns sure confuses me!
    A lot of folks think more with their wallet rather than about getting a reliable gun. I saw it in the gun shop I worked at all the time. Instead of waiting a little while longer and saving up enough to buy something used that will still be running in 100 years with a minimal amount of care, they'd rather plunk down $150 (or less, remember the days of $50 for a NIB .25 Jennings and Lorcin?) for a POS that is just as likely to a fail beyond repair before it needs to be cleaned as it is to function reliably.

    I think it was Lorcin that used to make a .25 that came with a laser sight built in that normally retailed for $99. I always thought that the folks that were buying them were getting a $25 pistol with a $75 sight.

    Personally, I trust a $100 pistol as much as I trust a $100 car.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    This is more correct.

    I'm gonna defend the 1911 a little bit. The 1911 is a design, drawn up by John Moses Browning. When done right it is as good as anything out there. The problem is, to make it right today costs a good bit of money (remember, the design turned 100 years old this year). Everyone is trying to find a cheaper way to do it and, while some have (Remington, the recent SA guns, Para, and hopefully Ruger), many have failed miserably at it (Charles Daly, Llama, AMT, and Auto-Ordnance). Then there are the companies that put a lot of money into them and charge accordingly (Wilson, Nighthawk Custom, Les Baer). The other issue is that it was designed around hardball ammo. Making it work with modern SD ammo can be a little hairy but it can be done.

    The reason you don't hear about the Hi-power is probably because it is a good design and hasn't really been cloned very much. It's also not as popular as the 1911 for some reason.

    Some who have Hi-points actually have had good luck. The rest are probably embarressed to say they own one. :D
    The Hi Power as been cloned extensively. You can get them right now in America that are made in Argentina (FM), Israel and Hungary. It's just that all of them are made better than some of the low end 1911 copies ever were. My first Hi Power was made in Argentina in the mid 80's on FN equipment that had been purchased to build them for the Argentine military and police. Except for the 'Made in Argentina' roll mark on the side, it looked and felt like a FN gun with 100% interchangeability of parts. It also outshot the high end Browning Hi Power Practical that was my second Hi Power all day, every day, with military style fixed sights.

  9. #48
    Lucky me I have never had a bad handgun.
    Now to defend my gun.

    I have a llama .380 mini clone of the 1911. I love it, but my buddy has the same gun and I hate it, why?

    Mine was made in Spain, his was made in South America. If you get a Llama from Spain it will work and is well made, but when they moved their quality stayed in Spain.

  10. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by nraynes View Post
    Lucky me I have never had a bad handgun.
    Now to defend my gun.

    I have a llama .380 mini clone of the 1911. I love it, but my buddy has the same gun and I hate it, why?

    Mine was made in Spain, his was made in South America. If you get a Llama from Spain it will work and is well made, but when they moved their quality stayed in Spain.
    Gun Tests tested a Llama .45ACP 1911 clone a few years ago and noted that the pistol shot about 10" to the right at 7 yards. Upon dissassembly they noticed that the bushing area of the slide was mis-milled (was over to one side) causing the barrel not be straight with the sights. I don't know for sure when this gun was made but the test was done in the late 1990s or early 2000s I think.

  11. #50
    Sounds like the Llamas in South America

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