Duracoat finish? Bad or Good? - Page 2
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Thread: Duracoat finish? Bad or Good?

  1. #11
    Is duracoat good? It depends on who applies it and the amount of time and skill taken in doing a good prep job. If the weapon is not properly prepared for the actual coating, one would be better served by leaving the weapon in its current state. Same could be said for the bluing process.

  2.   
  3. I have two experiences with duracoat .I built a 10/22(17hm2)
    and camoed it it duracoat.It's been about 3 years and all is well.
    Last year i duracoated a para warthog slide.Paras finishes are junk.At least mine was.This duracoat job did not last 3 months.I believe it to be my fault .
    I am going to try it again when I get the chance.Like any paint job it's all in the prep. My 10/17hm2 came out great ..I use it for squirrels,And the finish
    has held up great.So i think i did a bad prep..WSo as soon as i can find some
    person to bead blast my warthog slide I will do it again. I applied it with an airbrush.

  4. #13
    I have an AR-15 done in OD green Duracoat and I have no complaints at all. It looks great and wears great. It's the one on the right. :)


  5. Quote Originally Posted by S391 View Post
    I had the slide on my M&P pistol done in Duracoat last year and it's not bad. I have noticed that it is starting to wear a bit around the muzzle which is somewhat troubling considering I've only used it in 1 or 2 matches since I had it done.

    If I were to do it again I would spend the extra money and have Robar do it in their NP3 coating.
    It isn't the coating, it is the application. Here's how I do it:

    The surface must be ready to accept the duracoat. I typically use a fine media blast - it is especially important with stainless. I don't Duracoat over any other coating, I remove it. I then clean thoroughly with brake cleaner or acetone. ALL oils must be removed.

    I will heat parts (with a 500 watt halogen light) to warm (not hot). This opens the pores, if you will, of the metal. Seems to accept the paint better. I apply in very light passes with a small gravity feed sprayer, not a venturi-type airbrush. I make sure that I use the correct proportion of paint and hardener. 12:1 (1 tablespoon paint to 1/4 teaspoon hardener)

    I do all work inside a small booth I've built in the back of my shop. Dust will make for a poor finish. If you don't have the space for a few 2x4's and plastic sheeting, work in a garage with the door closed. Never refinish outside - too much junk in the air, humidity, paint waste, etc.

    After painting, the parts need heat to cure faster. I have an old dishwasher that isn't connected to water, but has a heated drying cycle. I could have disposed of it when we got the new one, but it is perfect for baking pistol parts. If you use your oven, your food will taste like Duracoat smells.

    I've attached the weapon I use in our local IPSC matches. It is a Springfield with 7000+ rounds since I refinished it. The bottom of the trigger has a little wear - very light aluminum and I'm not sure I got the prep right on it. Also the side of the grip safety has some marks from rubbing the frame. Amazingly, the slide rail have even held up - perhaps because of the high quality synthetic grease I use.

    If you are patient and particular, you can do a professional job of refinishing at home. Take care with the prep, and don't rush the curing. If you can't bake the finish, be prepared to put in in a dehumidified safe for a month or so to allow the finish to harden.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Sherwood, Arkansas
    Posts
    9
    I do some Duracoat, not a big fan. Must bake to get best results. My wife hates the duracoat tasting food. Soon i will start ceracoat. Understand it is much better. (building a gun oven from a gunlocker.)

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    S. Central mountains of Idaho
    Posts
    20

    Duracoat

    Quote Originally Posted by jblave View Post
    Anyone ever had or know about the Duracoat finish. I have an old AK that needs a new finish was thinking about this it comes in some cool paterns and colors. Does it hold up well? Is it hard to apply? Does anyone know where to have it professionally done in Missouri or Illinois?
    First Duracoat finish was on an HK USP Compact slide. Was applied professionally, & I let it "cure" for over 4 weeks before using. At less than 4 months, I had holster wear on the muzzle. 2nd weapon was a 10/22 barrel, by a different smith. Chipped within one month, after putting three mags through it. 3rd was a re-do on the HK slide. Lasted long enough for me to sell the weapon, but has done well for the new owner, and he shoots a LOT. All three smiths believe there was a problem with the catalyst on the original two pieces. I can't say, but I won't use it again. Too iffy.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Sherwood, Arkansas
    Posts
    9
    My best results is to bake it for 30 min at 325 f. I have not tried it on "plastic".

  9. Check out this website

    www.lonewolfarms.com

    Certified DuraCoat Finisher in St. Louis, MO

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