Main spring on a revolver
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Thread: Main spring on a revolver

  1. Main spring on a revolver

    Can this spring be changed to drop double action trigger weight?

  2.   
  3. Do you really want to reduce the Double Action Pull on a revolver? Your Double Action Pull is your safety. If you want accuracy: use the Single Action Pull!

  4. What Bob said-except for the single action part. Smooth is more important than light in this instance.

    Maybe you just need to get stronger to shoot it DA instead. Try this.

    With an empty gun or while using snap caps (and don't forget to verify -repeatedly- that it is empty or loaded with snap caps), point the gun at a spot on the wall that's about even with your eye level (I strongly suggest doing this over your bed to save your back initially). Put a coin (dimes work well) on the barrel flat behind the front sight. Watch the front sight (NOT the coin!!!) and pull the trigger. If you do it right, the coin stays in place. If you don't, it will fall off. When you can go all the way around the cylinder without the coin falling off, you are ready.

    Do the drill in short sessions of maybe 10 minutes each several times a day. Too long a session will lead to fatigue. The idea is to build both your hand and finger strength AND muscle memory at the same time. Focus on doing everything right and start s---l---o--w. Speed comes with practice and AFTER the movement is instinctive.

  5. everybody is an expert. So get rid of any handgun you own with a double action light pull.

  6. #5
    Join Date
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    Having the action honed by a gunsmith might help a lot. Smoother will feel lighter.

  7. #6
    The answer to the question is yes. The spring is only one part of a heavy DA pull. You can replace the spring with a lighter one or grind the one you have.

  8. #7
    There are two springs that contribute to the DA pull on a revolver - the main spring and the trigger rebound spring (at least on a Smith, a Ruger - I think - and probably a Taurus - older Colt revolvers actually used two legs of the same spring). Both can be replaced fairly easily. However, I will caution you to make sure the revolver is broken in first. I did this to a GP100 before it was well broken in and it shot fine for a while until the trigger pull suddenly (though probably not as sudden as I remember) dropped. It was so light I had trouble shooting it accurately until I "re-learned" the trigger. A gunsmith measured the SA pull at about 1-1/2 lbs and estimated the DA pull at 5-6 lbs, and verified that it was safe.

    You can do the trigger a lot of good by A) dry firing the weapon if you can't get to the range, and B) smoothing out mating surfaces inside the body of the revolver. On a Smith there is a black rectangular part that accomplishes the trigger rebound that rides in a channel inside the frame. Smooth out this channel with a dremel and some polishing compound. Stay away from the engagement surfaces though on the hammer and frame.

    If you decide to do it, change the rebound spring first. This won't affect the amount of force that the hammer puts on the primer and will therefore not cause a reliability issue as long as the trigger will reset. If this doesn't drop it enough then you can change the main spring but this can compromise the weapon's reliability. I replaced the mainspring in my S&W 686 and had two misfires in 50 rounds. I went back to the original spring as soon as I got home from the range.

  9. #8
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    A couple of caveats. 1) Doing your own work, if you aren't experienced can lead to trouble. Both with the gun and the courts, if you have to use it. 2) Using a dremel tool is like any other power tool. It's TOO easy to take off too much. You really can't put that metal back! They make action honing stone sets for this. Most supply companies sell a version. Slow and patient are what's called for here, if you want to do it yourself.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by XJ_MAC View Post
    A couple of caveats. 1) Doing your own work, if you aren't experienced can lead to trouble. Both with the gun and the courts, if you have to use it. 2) Using a dremel tool is like any other power tool. It's TOO easy to take off too much. You really can't put that metal back! They make action honing stone sets for this. Most supply companies sell a version. Slow and patient are what's called for here, if you want to do it yourself.
    Agree 1000%. It is difficult to take too much off in the areas that I am talking about but, when in doubt, stop polishing. And at all costs avoid the engagement notches (where the hammer engages the trigger to hold it back) or you can make a REAL mess. The area I am referring to is the inside of the frame itself. Also, there is a small spring inside the hammer on a smith that keeps the transfer bar in the forward position. It is easy to lose so be careful. It fell out of one of my revolvers and I had to take another one apart to try to figure out where it went.

    Dry fire and shoot the revolver for a while first to see if that accomplishes what you want. If not then consider spring changes and polishing. Some people advocate shooting bad guys on TV but obviously this can violate several gun safety rules.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    Dry fire and shoot the revolver for a while first to see if that accomplishes what you want. If not then consider spring changes and polishing. Some people advocate shooting bad guys on TV but obviously this can violate several gun safety rules.
    Good excuse to get a new TV. Just remember to place it against the wall behind the stove, or whatever else the wife would like to replace. That way she won't complain so much. Oh, and make sure she's not cooking in there at the time, of course. LOL

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