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Thread: practice distance for beginner

  1. #41
    The least expensive thing you can do is hire somebody to teach you to shoot. I'm not talking run and gun but to give you strong basic marksmanship and safe firearms handling instructions.

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  3. #42

    Thumbs up

    This was my first post on USA Carry way back when...Thank You everybody for your responses. I am happy to say that my shooting has improved a lot since then, and I have gained some very good info. about shooting, carrying, practicing, and safe handling of my firearm. It is a privilege to be a member here, Thank You again!

  4. #43
    Miss? No, you shouldn't miss.
    You can run... but you'll just die tired. 3%

  5. #44
    handgonnetoter Guest
    I usually practice at around 12, 21, and 30 feet. I try to practice moving while shooting too, especially backing up while shooting. If someone is coming at me, I want to be able to put a few steps between me and him while I am drawing. Just my thoughts on the matter.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by handgonnetoter View Post
    I usually practice at around 12, 21, and 30 feet. I try to practice moving while shooting too, especially backing up while shooting. If someone is coming at me, I want to be able to put a few steps between me and him while I am drawing. Just my thoughts on the matter.
    Just a hint... Try practicing shooting while backing-up on an angle if possible, 3-10 feet from a target, now draw while move oblique off target. Moving backwards directly from the bad guy makes you more of a stationary target than moving oblique off target, also you'll have less of a chance of falling down backwards due to foot control, momentum will cause your body weight to overcome your feet action.

    If you want a backwards retreat with the ability to shoot, practice facing away from your target, start walking and twist your body while shooting at your target and your feet are stepping facing away from your target and your shooting arm/head (one hand shooting) is facing your rear returning fire.

    Remember... if your an expose target, your chance of survival is to put as many rounds (rapid fire) as possible towards the bad guy. Its very hard to shoot and/or aim at someone who's shooting at you with rapid fire, their instinct is to get out of there/cover.

    Sometimes you may hear of a Officer returning fire with 8,10, or 15 rounds, if he/she is expose their chance of survival is becoming less of a target by returning rapid fire at the bad guy, and not allowing the bad guy to return fire, or at least without any type of precision.

    Shooting while moving is great, just be careful of Back-peddling too great of distance, either move oblique, or runaway while twisting the body/head returning fire with one arm, pointing and shooting. Just an idea

    I just don't recommend back-peddling to much... JMO

  7. #46
    handgonnetoter Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gunsite View Post
    Just a hint... Try practicing shooting while backing-up on an angle if possible, 3-10 feet from a target, now draw while move oblique off target. Moving backwards directly from the bad guy makes you more of a stationary target than moving oblique off target, also you'll have less of a chance of falling down backwards due to foot control, momentum will cause your body weight to overcome your feet action.

    If you want a backwards retreat with the ability to shoot, practice facing away from your target, start walking and twist your body while shooting at your target and your feet are stepping facing away from your target and your shooting arm/head (one hand shooting) is facing your rear returning fire.

    Remember... if your an expose target, your chance of survival is to put as many rounds (rapid fire) as possible towards the bad guy. Its very hard to shoot and/or aim at someone who's shooting at you with rapid fire, their instinct is to get out of there/cover.

    Sometimes you may hear of a Officer returning fire with 8,10, or 15 rounds, if he/she is expose their chance of survival is becoming less of a target by returning rapid fire at the bad guy, and not allowing the bad guy to return fire, or at least without any type of precision.

    Shooting while moving is great, just be careful of Back-peddling too great of distance, either move oblique, or runaway while twisting the body/head returning fire with one arm, pointing and shooting. Just an idea

    I just don't recommend back-peddling to much... JMO
    You are right. It, unfortunatly, seems to be instinct just to back up. I need to pick up a .22 pistol to practice with. Even though 9mm is fairly inexpensive, it is still way more expensive than .22 LR. Then maybe I can work on moving to the side, at an angle, while keeping the pistol trained toward the threat and doing some shooting while doing the moving. I think this takes time and some real live firing to get to be good enough to save ones skin when the balloon goes up. Thanks for the advise just the same.

  8. Remember SAFETY... render your weapon safe and practice the coordination of your feet and body movement. With you weapon render SAFE, stand in front of a target, now practice scenarios of retreat, shooting and/or hitting a target is not important at this point, body and feet movement is, and remember start small, don't set yourself up for FAILURE.

    Practice enough to where your movement becomes instinct, and you'll find back peddling becomes unnatural. Good Luck

  9. #48
    JJ had a great point as did others that mentioned practice for PURPOSE.

    Did you get your CCW so you could be an "all star target shooter" at the range and have a shiny reminder at your side?

    Or did you get it so that you can protect yourself and family from a personal attack when your life is on the line?

    I'm happy to see you get your CCW and now its time to figure out the PURPOSE and reason you got it in the first place :):):)

    If its self defense lets worry more about what a bad guy is capable of from 5-20 feet away...even at 20 feet away you are now likely having to use some form of UNARMED self defense (which I teach my students) to even have a chance at drawing your firearm.

    Drawing at the wrong time can get you killed.

    Can you get stabbed, sliced or shot once a BG is in your face...yep but your will to win will circumvent those facts as your job is stop the threat.

    Attack the "real weapon" of your assailant and I will give you a hint...its not the one in their hand.

    Once the weapon is disabled all "tools" are nullified as a gun/knife/bat on the ground won't hurt you...a crazy bad guy with a brain can!

    Best regards.

    J.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Keysville Va.
    Posts
    304
    I know this is an old thread but I must put in my 2 cent's worth. It is like playing baseball LOOK at what you want to shoot and point your hand at it and pull the trigger. Your hands will follow your eyes and at combat range you don't need sights you need instinct. Try it at close range 1 or 2 yards and get comfortable with it then back up untill you can hit out to 7 and even 15 or 20 yards with the time and practice it will work.
    Bill

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    ElK Creek Kentucky
    Posts
    437
    Like Adatiowa said, anything within 21 feet is a hard shot to pull off if BG coming at you. I pratice moving while shooting, it helps expand the distance. but you need to learn how to defend yourself to give you more time to unholster your gun. PRACTICE alot>>>>>

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