CCW Person-How Ready Are You To Take Action - Page 4
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Thread: CCW Person-How Ready Are You To Take Action

  1. Dirty Harry said it best.... A man has to know his limitations, i'm going to change that to a PERSON has to know their Limitations, and its true.

    On a judgement call the above holds true, but.. sometimes you have no choice and force to act, and what i mean acting i mean MOVING, TAKING COVER, Taking The Shot ... it can be any one of them, or all of them.

    So depending on your training, how and when to react will depend on your state of readiness, you can only default to your training when confronted by a situation. Training gives you confidence and self discipline, how much training you have will dictate that confidence and self discipline.

    Higher training levels such as LE and military people have an incline to help others... i agree with that. People who protect the public for a living/occupation tend to react as habit.

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Florida Panhandle
    Posts
    3,098

    Exclamation We all have limits...

    Quote Originally Posted by gunsite View Post
    Dirty Harry said it best.... A man has to know his limitations, i'm going to change that to a PERSON has to know their Limitations, and its true.

    On a judgement call the above holds true, but.. sometimes you have no choice and force to act, and what i mean acting i mean MOVING, TAKING COVER, Taking The Shot ... it can be any one of them, or all of them.

    So depending on your training, how and when to react will depend on your state of readiness, you can only default to your training when confronted by a situation. Training gives you confidence and self discipline, how much training you have will dictate that confidence and self discipline.

    Higher training levels such as LE and military people have an incline to help others... i agree with that. People who protect the public for a living/occupation tend to react as habit.
    No man is indestructible. You are right about military/LEO/EMT training vs. civilian status. I helped respond to a flipped car about 2-3 weeks ago and was one of the few to help the LEO on the scene extract the trapped woman. There were about 20 bystanders who could have helped steady the car (upside down over a drainage ditch full of water) and instead just stood around looking dumb. All total 3 LEO's on the scene and 3 prior/retired military did the actual work, until the EMT's arrived to check her out. I was mildly upset by the mindset and rude comments of those who were armchair quarter backing the scene without lifting a finger.
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  4. #33

    If you carry...

    Warning "Hot Button". Sorry if I offend, not my intent. However, I can tell you from my experiences in combat, To this day I struggle with the memory of my soldiers who were wounded or killed. I am a recently retired Master SGT. I always say "Don't try to be a hero". and if you can avoid trouble, by all means do so. But, If you carry a gun to protect yourself and your family, what does that make me if I won't protect my fellow Human beings. Just by nature Military and LEO's feel the obligation to protect EVERYONE and ANYONE who needs it. We are not "sheep" and the Police are not sheppards. Sometimes things just happen. We cannot always control what the bad guys will do and when. I hope and pray that if my Wife or Family are in danger, that anyone legalyl carrying will be brave enough to help them. I will help you unconditionally if it is within my power. In my opinion, if you can't, then don't carry. Again, just my opinion. We are talking about a one in a million chance that something bad could happen. But, isn't that the reason you carry? Thats why I do. I love my country and all it stands for. But when I walk outside my door I mind my business and watch for trouble. Its what I'm trained to do. Even if I didn't carry, I use a cheesstick to help you. But, I know you are out there. While stationed in Houston I once saved 2 kids drowning. I almost drowed myself. And sure enough people that were capible of helping me, left the scene running because they were scared. As my wife watched us going out to sea all I could think of my Wife watching me die. I won't let your Wife die. Not on my watch. Sorry again for the emotion. God Bless.

  5. I, too, hope to do what you voiced. Hopefully my father's lessons of simple "right and wrong" will move me to do what's right if I'm there when the SHTF. Thank you for your willingness to look out for my family and friends. I'll try to do the same for yours, but I hope the need never presents itself.

  6. #35
    After years of practice at target shooting, I've decided it was time to improve my defensive skills by taking additional formal training. Should it ever be necessary to defend myself in a courtroom, having training beyond a carry permit class might be useful.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by amrote View Post
    I have been in either the military or LE my entire adult life. I guess that makes me more inclined to intervene to save another life if they are put in danger. I do not go out looking for trouble and pray that I never run into anything, but if the need arises to save someone’s life and you have the means to do it – why wouldn’t you?

    What if that was your loved one is the one in danger, would you want someone with the means, training, and opportunity to save their life saying it’s not my responsibility. There is a huge difference between property loss and the loss of life. Money and objects can be replaced, but you cannot bring back your wife, husband, son, daughter, or other family member that has been taken from you by some low life POS.

    I am speaking from experience. My aunt and uncle were murdered in April in the “safety” of their home. There are bad people out there that have no concern for another’s life. If you carry a weapon and can prevent someone the pain of having to bury a loved one, why wouldn’t you intervene?

    I take the opportunity to train anytime I can. Many people at work think I am crazy for taking my own time and money to take advanced training courses. Being a firearms and DT Instructor, I think I owe it to myself and those I teach to continually learn and be the best instructor I can be. We live in an ever changing world and we owe it to ourselves to be prepared to handle anything we will encounter.
    I agree amrote!
    I couldn't live with myself if I could've done something and didn't. Isn't that why we carry? Too many people carry and don't wanna get involved. Leave the guns at home I say. JMHO!

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    FT Bragg, NC
    Posts
    68
    The way I see it, when I raised my right hand I wrote a blank check payable to the American people for up to and including my life. I do not feel that this check can only be cashed in combat on foreign soil. It can be cashed by the politicians or a citizen in need just the same. Does this mean I want to die for my country ? hell no, wars are not won by dying for your country.

    As a Paratrooper, I could not look at myself in the mirror if I were to stand by and watch someone be hurt or killed by some low life. I know my family would understand why I did what I did if something were to happen to me.

    Just like when people ask me why I joined the Army, much less Airborne Infantry....Somebody has to, why not me? If I don't do it, who will?

  9. #38
    This subject has been worn out on just about every gun forum there is, about what you would or would not do in case SHTF, and you may be able to do something about it, truth is we, if we are being honest with ourselfs, do not have a clue as to what we would do, we can sit here at our computors and spout off that I would do this or that or call 911, but untill we each get put in that situation, (and I would hope none of us ever were) none of us are sure what we would do

  10. As combat vet, my view maybe isn't completely clear to everyone, but I'll try to get it out in a way that makes sense.

    My brothers and sisters in arms can chime in here - your first engagement isn't necessarily your best example of professional soldiering. It is the beginning of learning fast for sure!

    One of the most challenging messages to convey to a new fighter is that you must be decisive. To do so means being mentally confident of your options before the problem is presented.

    In other words, make up your mind to win before you need to fight. Then, train the way you're going to fight so that you can win. Winning involves being supremely confident in your options, not trying to develop them when it all goes down.

    My view is that you cannot under estimate the mental commitment, nor the physical practice, you have to develop before the SHTF.

    How do you get there? Train, study, learn, practice, think it through, participate here, etc. I'm not suggesting you walk around with a hair trigger - it's actually the opposite.

    When you reach that "place", you step out of the unfolding drama and see the potential gravity of the situation . You pick out the players, rapidly select options, and swiftly execute.

    Listen to your SHTF Spiderman senses ;-) You know when something is brewing in your local pub - and it's not fresh beer - have the emotional maturity to step back and see the situation for what it is - you deescalate yourself right out the door.

    When you find yourself in a situation that requires an immediate call to action - I consider a home invasion one of most limited option scenarios - you have it wired in your head that what weapon you'll grab, how you'll move the kids/wife/husband/dog to safety, and where you've established your final line. If they touch the bedroom/closet/den door, the buckshot flies. You already have it figured out, you just need to execute the option.

    Well, I rambled anyway. Hopefully a little bit of it is communicated clearly.

    Eric
    aka Sgt_Rock

  11. #40
    Hey Rocketgeezer, Just punch out. Apparently you haven't been reading and comprehending. There are plenty off LEO/ Military as well as others on this site alone that have been in bad situations and acted heroically. Maybe you don't know what you'll do and thats OK. But, don't speak for us and don't assume. SGT Rock, your dead on, thanks. And for everyone else out there that knows it all, leave these threads. I for one enjoy hearing about this stuff as well as discussing it. Military and LEO think alike and share the same likes and dislikes. It is what it is. At least we don't put people down to get out our points. (retired MSG, U.S. Infantry)

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