Malfunction Drills - Page 5
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Thread: Malfunction Drills

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    Revolvers have just different malfunctions than semi-autos, because they have a different design.
    Those malfunctions are rare, whereas auto malfunctions are common.

    Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    As for your out-of-battery statement, if you would have taken a training class you would know how to avoid that.
    You're saying it takes a special class to keep an auto opperating.

    No such special class is needed for the revolver. This is yet another advantage the revolver has over autos.

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  3. #42
    This thread has never been on point.

  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genasi View Post
    Those malfunctions are rare, whereas auto malfunctions are common.
    I wouldn't say that autoloader malfunctions are common I can't remember the last time I had one (actually I just did it was a broken firing pin spring on a 6906 a year or two ago) but when they happen I automatically reduce the malfunction because I've had training and practice on reducing malfunctions and getting back in the fight.
    In an emergency individuals do not rise to the occasion, they fall to the level of their MASTERED training
    Barrett Tillman

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by HKS View Post
    This thread has never been on point.
    So get it back on point. Tell us how you train/practice for a stoppage in your handguns
    In an emergency individuals do not rise to the occasion, they fall to the level of their MASTERED training
    Barrett Tillman

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genasi View Post
    Those malfunctions are rare, whereas auto malfunctions are common.
    You have some sort of data to back up your claim, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Genasi View Post
    You're saying it takes a special class to keep an auto opperating.

    No such special class is needed for the revolver. This is yet another advantage the revolver has over autos.
    There is no "special class". If you don't know how to avoid an out of battery issue in close contact combat, that just means you have never been properly trained on semi-aoto handguns.

  7. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by bofh View Post
    There is no "special class". If you don't know how to avoid an out of battery issue in close contact combat, that just means you have never been properly trained on semi-aoto handguns.
    "Properly trained on semi-auto handguns" = special class. You just proved my point, you just said you need special training on semi-autos in order to keep the slide from comming out of battery in a fight. Thanks :)

    One does not need any such class with revolvers. Simple to opperate, lower maintenence, fewer things to go wrong.

    Capacity is a false sense of security since your auto will probably jam on the 1st shot while my revolver will fire every time.

  8. Actually there are several issues that can cause a revolver cylinder not to rotate, resulting in a total failure to shoot.

    Pawl wear, spring breakage, a warped crane, or even unloading spent brass with the barrel level or pointed down, allowing residue to build up star extractor.

    Not failure proof by any means, and yes you need "special training" just like an automatic pistol to know how to correctly handle your firearm.

  9. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by thewitt View Post
    Actually there are several issues that can cause a revolver cylinder not to rotate, resulting in a total failure to shoot.

    Pawl wear, spring breakage, a warped crane, or even unloading spent brass with the barrel level or pointed down, allowing residue to build up star extractor.

    Not failure proof by any means, and yes you need "special training" just like an automatic pistol to know how to correctly handle your firearm.
    The question was of clearing malfunctions, not basic handeling. Please stay on point.

  10. Malfunction Drills

    You were saying that no special training was needed to manage a revolver, and I disagree with that. Sorry if you find that offensive. Any of these failures will result in a malfunction, and novices - those untrained - will struggle with them. Particularly a fouled star extractor, which is quite common for novice shooters and is certainly a malfunction.

  11. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by thewitt View Post
    You were saying that no special training was needed to manage a revolver, and I disagree with that. Sorry if you find that offensive. Any of these failures will result in a malfunction, and novices - those untrained - will struggle with them. Particularly a fouled star extractor, which is quite common for novice shooters and is certainly a malfunction.
    A fouled extractor doesn't come into play until after the shooting is over, after the police report, after your lawyer gets you out of jail, and after you get your gun back so you can then clean it.

    In other words, a fouled extractor is beyond the scope of a self defence shooting and thus beyond the scope of this thread and any claim made by any party herein.

    Please stay on point.

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