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Thread: Back to Basics.

  1. #11
    Here's a left-handed one:
    http://www.reloadbench.com/pdf/files...LeftHanded.pdf
    The page I got it from (there is also a right handed one and a lot of other targets for download):
    Rifle & Pistol Targets
    People don't like to be meddled with. We tell them what to do, what to think, don't run, don't walk. We're in their homes and in their heads and we haven't the right. We're meddlesome.--River Tam

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  3. #12
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    Wow. So many replies here. I'll check out some of the YouTube videos and now I have some items to go off of when doing searches.

    My deal with the circle is that there'll be a few holes all over that circle. I'm not consistent.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pele View Post
    Wow. So many replies here. I'll check out some of the YouTube videos and now I have some items to go off of when doing searches.

    My deal with the circle is that there'll be a few holes all over that circle. I'm not consistent.
    You should spend some time dry-firing (making sure you have no ammunition in the room when you do it for safety). If you can borrow a gun with a laser, you should dry fire with that.

    Another exercise is to put a pencil in your unloaded gun, touch it lightly to a piece of paper and pull the trigger using your usual shooting stance. Strive for a point on the paper as opposed to any lines. This gives you an idea if you are pulling the gun off target when you pull the trigger.

    Another exercise is to support your unloaded gun with sandbags or whatever you can come up with. Without touching it, sight to a wall where you've taped a piece of paper. Have someone with a pencil mark the spot you are sighted on. Do that repeatedly. The goal is to have pencil marks nearly all together. This will give you an idea about your sight picture consistency.
    Maybejim

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by maybejim View Post
    You should spend some time dry-firing (making sure you have no ammunition in the room when you do it for safety). If you can borrow a gun with a laser, you should dry fire with that.

    Another exercise is to put a pencil in your unloaded gun, touch it lightly to a piece of paper and pull the trigger using your usual shooting stance. Strive for a point on the paper as opposed to any lines. This gives you an idea if you are pulling the gun off target when you pull the trigger.

    Another exercise is to support your unloaded gun with sandbags or whatever you can come up with. Without touching it, sight to a wall where you've taped a piece of paper. Have someone with a pencil mark the spot you are sighted on. Do that repeatedly. The goal is to have pencil marks nearly all together. This will give you an idea about your sight picture consistency.
    I can dry fire with a 9mm round sitting on the top of the slide, just behind the rear sight and not have it fall off.

    I'm not sure how this pencil deal works. Will the hammer launch the pencil out or something?

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pele View Post
    I can dry fire with a 9mm round sitting on the top of the slide, just behind the rear sight and not have it fall off.

    I'm not sure how this pencil deal works. Will the hammer launch the pencil out or something?

    What part of "NO AMMO IN THE ROOM" did you not understand? When doing any "dry firing" exercise, be sure that you don't have ANY live ammo in the room. Secure the ammo in a locked container or another room if possible. If your firearm requires it, you should use "snap caps" or some other type of inert "dummy" or "training" type ammo. We don't want to read about you becoming a statistic.

    You can use a coin to put on the slide just behind the front sight. This will help indicate if you're squeezing the trigger properly.

    The pencil on paper exercise works when the firing pin or striker of the firearm impacts the pencil eraser. If you're squeezing the trigger properly, there will be minimal pencil marks on the paper. If you see lines, swirls, etc on the paper, then you did something you're not supposed to.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  7. #16
    wolfhunter Guest
    Pele,
    Put the pencil in the barrel, position yourself so that the pencil tip just barely touches a paper target when presented from your shooting stance. Aim and dry fire. Any movement caused by your technique will be "illustrated" on the paper. When you are REALLY good, 10 minutes of dry fire practice will create only one dot.

  8. #17
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    If you're that steady with your dry firing, and still are missing as you say, I'd guess your sight picture is off or there is a problem with the gun (or you have a flinch associated with knowing it's going to go bang).

    Try having someone else load the gun for you and mix in a snap cap. You'll then be able to see what you are doing with the gun when it unexpectedly doesn't go off.

    Again what you really need is a bigger piece of paper so you can see for sure where your shots are going for sure.
    Maybejim

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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    What part of "NO AMMO IN THE ROOM" did you not understand? When doing any "dry firing" exercise, be sure that you don't have ANY live ammo in the room. Secure the ammo in a locked container or another room if possible.
    Maybe I need to start further back with safety.

    I always drop the mag and make sure there's nothing in the chamber when I pick up a semi-auto...

    I also always have one buddy of mine at the range telling me, "Get your finger off the trigger."

    At one point at the range, I had a problem with a magazine and walked out onto the sales floor because the range attendant was out there. I got a, "Don't do that again," warning.

    If your firearm requires it, you should use "snap caps" or some other type of inert "dummy" or "training" type ammo. We don't want to read about you becoming a statistic.
    How would I know if the gun requires a plastic dummy? It is a Ruger P95 with a manual safety, not the spring loaded decocker. it's an older model without the picatinny rail.
    Last edited by Pele; 12-05-2008 at 11:30 PM.

  10. #19
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    Glad you haven't had any "ND" or other safety issues to date. Now that you're aware of the "no live ammo in the room" rule when practicing "dry firing" I'm sure you won't be doing it again.

    Rule of thumb is that if your firearm has an external hammer, then you should be using snap caps. Reason for this is that in firearms like the 1911, the firing pin can be damaged by repeated dry firing. In pistols like the Glock, XD and M&P, there is a "striker" versus a firing pin, which is more tolerant to dry firing. If in doubt, contact the firearms manufacturer (many of them have their contact info online), or you can simply purchase sanp caps in the various calibers for all of your firearms. When selecting snap caps, I recommend using the "full metal" ones (usually aluminum) rather than the plastic ones. I've seen many of the plastic snap caps shatter and cause problems with the operation of the firearm.

    Happy shooting!



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  11. #20
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    ^

    What is ND? Non-Discharge? Like a dud round?
    I'd expect to rack the slide, pick up the dud and drop it in the hole in the ammo case at the back of the range marked for duds.

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