Firearm recommendation for huntin' wa'bbits
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Thread: Firearm recommendation for huntin' wa'bbits

  1. Firearm recommendation for huntin' wa'bbits

    Anyone hunt rabbits?

    What do you recommend?

    Thanks!

  2.   
  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by BoomChick View Post
    Anyone hunt rabbits?

    What do you recommend?

    Thanks!
    I use a .22 rifle. Yummy in the crock pot or baked, but kind of tough fried.

  4. #3
    .22 LR

    .22 Mag

    .17 HMR

    .410 Shotgun

    20 Gauge Shotgun

    12 Gauge shotgun

    Blowdarts

    Air Rifle
    Victory rewards not the army that fires the most rounds, but who is the more accurate shot. ---Unknown

  5. Quote Originally Posted by PascalFleischman View Post
    .22 LR
    .22 Mag
    .17 HMR
    .410 Shotgun
    20 Gauge Shotgun
    12 Gauge shotgun
    Blowdarts
    Air Rifle
    Blowdarts? Really? That's pretty cool. . . .

    I was on very bad terms with the last 12 Gauge I shot . . . Believe it or not, I actually got bruised on the backside of my shoulder. . . either I'm a wuss, or I didn't do something right. . . And no, I didn't fall down.

    Of rifles and shotguns, which do you prefer for rabbits?

    Quote Originally Posted by mom of 3 angels View Post
    I use a .22 rifle. Yummy in the crock pot or baked, but kind of tough fried.
    Pressure cooker should work then? Do you brown it with anything first for the crock pot?

    Thanks folks!

    -Boomchick
    Last edited by BoomChick; 10-07-2008 at 02:52 PM.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BoomChick View Post

    I was on very bad terms with the last 12 Gauge I shot . . . Believe it or not, I actually got bruised on the backside of my shoulder. . . either I'm a wuss, or I didn't do something right. . . And no, I didn't fall down.

    Of rifles and shotguns, which do you prefer for rabbits?


    -Boomchick

    You were probably not gripping the shotgun tight enough to your shoulder. It should transfer the recoil to your upper body, rather than take the blount force. Grip the gun tightly to your shoulder, put about 80% of your weight on the front foot, and pull the trigger. Otherwise, it'll pound your shoulder time & time again.

    Shotgun vs. rifle for wabbits? I'd say shotgun unless 1) you're a crack shot or 2) the wabbits aren't running.
    Victory rewards not the army that fires the most rounds, but who is the more accurate shot. ---Unknown

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by BoomChick View Post
    Pressure cooker should work then? Do you brown it with anything first for the crock pot?

    Thanks folks!

    -Boomchick
    Pressure cooker would work great. I haven't browned it first, but you sure could--might try that next time. I usually just put it in with some potatoes/carrots/onion/etc. and cook it until it's tender. Every time I've tried to fry it, it just gets tough like rabbit jerky--still tasty, but man, it takes a lot of chewing! I have not tried any of these, but here's a fun selection of recipes: http://www.rabbithuntingonline.com/recipes/

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by BoomChick View Post
    Blowdarts? Really? That's pretty cool. . . .

    I was on very bad terms with the last 12 Gauge I shot . . . Believe it or not, I actually got bruised on the backside of my shoulder. . . either I'm a wuss, or I didn't do something right. . . And no, I didn't fall down.
    Yep, just get it tight to your shoulder. One problem with shotguns if you are on the smaller side (like lots of ladies are) is the length of pull on many will be too long making it so you can't get it properly shouldered. I've shot 12 gauges that I had a blast with, and some that left me with nasty bruises out past my shoulder because they didn't fit right. Shot a 10 ga once and it knocked me a step back (note I only shot it once), but have had good times with 12 ga guns without too much of a beating as long as they fit right.

    Also it depends on the loads you are shooting. Target loads are a lot easier on you than, for example, goose hunting loads.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by PascalFleischman View Post
    You were probably not gripping the shotgun tight enough to your shoulder. It should transfer the recoil to your upper body, rather than take the blount force. Grip the gun tightly to your shoulder, put about 80% of your weight on the front foot, and pull the trigger. Otherwise, it'll pound your shoulder time & time again.

    Shotgun vs. rifle for wabbits? I'd say shotgun unless 1) you're a crack shot or 2) the wabbits aren't running.
    Nah, I had that dang gun snugged up very well and good weight distribution on my feet. Maybe placement on my shoulder? Dunno. . . Didn't have any bruising on the front of me. . . Just the backside of my shoulder. . . Maybe I didn't move with it enough?

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by PascalFleischman View Post
    You were probably not gripping the shotgun tight enough to your shoulder. It should transfer the recoil to your upper body, rather than take the blount force. Grip the gun tightly to your shoulder, put about 80% of your weight on the front foot, and pull the trigger. Otherwise, it'll pound your shoulder time & time again.

    Shotgun vs. rifle for wabbits? I'd say shotgun unless 1) you're a crack shot or 2) the wabbits aren't running.
    +1 on the shotgun shooting stance. Many folks make the mistake of holding the shotgun improperly and not "leaning into it".

    As for the wabbits, I could just imagine hunting them with the "GSG-5". Target acquisition is great and the ability to rapid fire is amazing. Would be a lot of fun, but I can imagine that I would be blowing a lot of ammo on a running wabbit!

    For wabbits, I tend to favor my 12 gauge shotgun loaded with #6 or #4 bird shot.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  11. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by mom of 3 angels View Post
    Yep, just get it tight to your shoulder. One problem with shotguns if you are on the smaller side (like lots of ladies are) is the length of pull on many will be too long making it so you can't get it properly shouldered. Also it depends on the loads you are shooting. Target loads are a lot easier on you than, for example, goose hunting loads.
    Another option for smaller build folks is shooting a "youth model". I have a 20 gauge Remington 870 express that's a youth model. Has a shorter stock and is easier to handle for most ladies and first time shooters. I've used this shotgun in high brush when hunting various game birds and on a couple of wild dog hunts. It's a very comfortable gun to shoot, though I sill prefer my Mossberg 500.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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