How to sight with bifocals
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Thread: How to sight with bifocals

  1. How to sight with bifocals

    New pistol shooter -- and darned if I can get the sights properly in focus. If I'm wearing my reading glasses, no problem -- but how often will that happen in a self-defense situation? Hardly ever.

    If I am wearing bifocals I could tilt my head up, but that is really unnatural and unreliable.

    If I have no glasses on (burglar in the middle of the night). then it's nearly impossible. (I don't have terrible distance vision, but the near vision is shot) When I practice I find myself doing all kinds of head, eye, shooting position contortions, none of which makes for a smooth efficient sight and shot.

    So, you instructors, how do you get guys like me to get a good focus?

    I'm about to just say I need to get a laser ...

  2.   
  3. #2
    Joe: I wear trifocals and have the same basic problem. Hope you find an answer, I haven't.

  4. #3
    Joe -

    I have the same problem too. I found an Optometrist who is also a shooter and here's what we came up with; when on the range I wear contacts to correct my astigmatism and far vision then a pair of single-vision safety glasses to bring my front sight into sharp focus. This blurs my far vision a bit but it isn't too bad. Whether this would work for you would depend on your particular vision and it is definitely a range only solution. For my carry guns I use laser grips.

    The other solution my optometrist suggested was laser surgery but laser grips were cheaper.

    This isn't much help I know but it was all I could come up with.

    Best of Luck,

    Steve

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by joemendoza View Post
    New pistol shooter -- and darned if I can get the sights properly in focus. If I'm wearing my reading glasses, no problem -- but how often will that happen in a self-defense situation? Hardly ever.

    If I am wearing bifocals I could tilt my head up, but that is really unnatural and unreliable.

    If I have no glasses on (burglar in the middle of the night). then it's nearly impossible. (I don't have terrible distance vision, but the near vision is shot) When I practice I find myself doing all kinds of head, eye, shooting position contortions, none of which makes for a smooth efficient sight and shot.

    So, you instructors, how do you get guys like me to get a good focus?

    I'm about to just say I need to get a laser ...
    There is an inherent problem with the ability to focus at multiple parallaxes with glasses. That problem is that glasses are set up so that your eyes gravitate to a specific point where you can see most clearly. This is caused by the lenses being ground to accommodate a natural point of vision. When they fit you for your glasses they found this by putting the little dot in front of your eye when you tried on the frames. That effectively caused you to have a specific point in the lenses that was the clearest. If you look at many people with older glasses you can see that they always tilt their head (Even the slightest bit) while they are wearing their glasses. This is because the clearest vision through the lenses rarely matched the natural point of vision (Being the position your eyes sit in when you are not wearing your glasses).

    There are 2 good ways to combat this.

    First, try moving the gun and your head until the sights line up and are clear. This does not work for many people, but in nearly as many cases it will fix the problem. Keep in mind that this will adjust your natural shooting position and will take some time and practice to get used to.

    Second, find yourself a good instructor that can teach you instinctive shooting. In self defense with a hand gun, instinctive shooting is far more effective and is a lot faster. A good instinctive shooting course costs about the same as a good laser, but will be good with all of your firearms and not just the one you bolt it to.

    I hope this answers your questions. If I missed anything let me know.
    .... And let the one having no sword sell his outer garment and buy one. ~God
    http://www.cjdefense.com/ Wisconsin

  6. Thanks for the information, guys. I'll look into all this. My brother just solved his problem by convincing his ophthalmologist to put new lenses in both eyes. The doc didn't want to do it, because there are risks and is normally performed only on old folks who really really need it, as when you have cataracts. But it worked out great for my brother. Takes a year or so for the eye muscles to get adjusted, but he is very pleased. My ophthalmologist says in 5-10 years everyone will be able to get new lenses for a grand or so.

    I think I'll go for instinctive (point?) shooting, and a laser .... but maybe look at the other options ... I wonder how instructors at Gunsight, Frontsight handle this.

  7. #6
    POINT
    SHOOTING
    There is some good info at this site.
    ~spwenger's DEFENSIVE USE OF FIREARMS: Point Shooting
    When I changed from Trifocals to Progressive lenses it helped some.
    For self defense it usually is at close range and what i was told and have done is focus on the front site and let the
    target be a little fuzzy. Not much help for comp shooting but I gave up on that for pistol a long time ago.
    Now if I could just find an ankle holster for an AR and Acog I would be set.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Joe, as I got older I found it more difficult to focus on both my sights and the targets. I changed all my sights to TruGlo TFO's. They glow brightly in the sun and at night making it a little easier. When all else fails? CT LaserGrips on your PP guns.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  9. +1 or point shooting. All of the scenarios for self defense are typically within 3-10 ft so point shooting is the solution. Practice this the next time you go to the range with a target about 2-4 steps away (6 to 10 ft away).
    Draw the pistol from the holster, rotate the pistol toward the target, extend the pistol just past your body while still at your side, fire two shots into the target, not yourself then access the situation prior to re-holstering. Repeat this until you find the proper stance, and point. then practice to acquire muscle memory and it becomes second nature.

    If you just want target practice have the bifocal put at the top of your aiming eye so that you tilt your head down to see the front sight.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldgrunt View Post
    Joe: I wear trifocals and have the same basic problem. Hope you find an answer, I haven't.
    I wear progressive lenses and have the same issue as well.

    It's funny how I can get absolute newbies to shoot better than I can. I usually have students in CWP classes hitting their targets better than me by the end of the day.

  11. #10
    I used to wear trifocals. Now, I wear progressives and have absolutely no problem. I also practice point and shoot while not wearing glasses, cause that's probably how a defensive situation would come down (middle of the night). I swear by the progressives, although it'll take a week or two to get used to them.

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