Practice frequency?
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Thread: Practice frequency?

  1. #1

    Practice frequency?

    I've been around firearms most of my life, but mostly rifles & shotguns. I've recently purchased a Ruger SR9c for home and carry, and have a Ruger Mark III Target for indoor range and I hope winter Postal League competition.

    What do instructors here recommend for practice? I'm thinking at least once a month, but being new and needing to feel more confident as far as carrying open/concealed, I should get more range time to achieve muscle memory and proficiency.

    My club's indoor range is .22 full lead only, so the 9 will be always be at the outdoor range across the road.

    The only personalized instruction I've had has been at the NRA pistol class I took for my CCW. I qualified to shoot indoors fairly easily, putting 12 of 12 rounds on the target at 50 feet w/ the Mark III pretty much right out of the box. It wasn't a tight group or anything, but it was reasonable for the first try.

    I'm thinking about taking the NRA sponsored defense courses, but have to find them in my part of Maine.

    What do police folk do as far as range time? I imagine when they're at the academy it's pretty intensive, but once they are in the routine of being a cop, how often do they practice? Thanks for any input you gentlemen care to offer.

  2.   
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Charleston, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    159
    I try to go once per month. I am very proficient with the two handguns I own so I mostly go just to have fun shooting at targets. One thing I will say is that there are two types of practice. One is at the range where you practice your breathing techniques and trigger squeeze to stay on target hitting a paper target in a controlled environment. At home you should be practicing with how to clear your weapon from concealed carry and hitting a target quickly. In other words, in a real violent encounter you may not have the time to get into the proper stance and recreate the controlled environment you are used to at the indoor range. One of the instructors I had told me to buy a cheap laser pointer and rubber band it to the barrel of the weapon (if you can not afford the real thing) and make sure the weapon is not loaded. Then practice clearing the holster and pointing the weapon at an object such as a pillow on the couch. Practice it until you can hit the target with the laser beam successfully.

  4. As a LEO I practice once a week but sometimes due to schedules I do every other week. I practice as much as possible.

    The frequency on how often you practice is up to you . It all depends on your experience and your confidence with your firearm . I always say practice because you are never good. You can always get better.

  5. #4
    Lately I've been trying to get to the range every couple of weeks. But then, I recently updated my firearms collection, and have been getting more serious about my defensive shooting skills.

    The range I go to is very informal and private, part of a little out-of-the-way gun shop. I usually can get it to myself on Saturday mornings, so I can do proper isoceles stance / target shooting at 25 to 50 feet. Or I can get up close and personal to the target for defensive draw-and-fire drills.

    PS - if you have a range where you can do the close up drills, BE SURE to wear proper safety gear. Which you should do anyway. But I'm emphasizing it because I got a nice little shrapnel cut about an inch above my right eye last time. Safety glasses kept it from being much worse...but a baseball cap might have been a good idea too.

    Anyway - happy shooting, and stay safe.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  6. #5
    Thanks for the sound advice, gents. I will practice quick draw accuracy drills at home w/ dry fire (I have some snap caps for the SR9c). I bought a Mitch Rosen leather holster for o.c. It need a little breaking in because it is super snug - hard to draw.

    There was a shrapnel issue at my indoor range before I joined. Apparently some irresponsible types were in there shooting jacketed high velocity stuff and pitted the back stop and then other lead rounds started hitting the pits and coming back. Like you, Philip, one guy sustained a facial cut. They had to tear it all apart and install a new back stop, computerized i.d. keyless entry, etc, etc. Only lower velocity lead allowed now, but I'll ask about closer range shooting.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Houston Metro Area, Texas
    Posts
    3,004
    I try at least once a week sometimes more.

  8. #7
    My practice frequency is usually within the 50MHz or 6m band.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by robfrommaine View Post
    What do instructors here recommend for practice? I'm thinking at least once a month, but being new and needing to feel more confident as far as carrying open/concealed, I should get more range time to achieve muscle memory and proficiency.

    My club's indoor range is .22 full lead only, so the 9 will be always be at the outdoor range across the road.

    The only personalized instruction I've had has been at the NRA pistol class I took for my CCW. I qualified to shoot indoors fairly easily, putting 12 of 12 rounds on the target at 50 feet w/ the Mark III pretty much right out of the box. It wasn't a tight group or anything, but it was reasonable for the first try.

    I'm thinking about taking the NRA sponsored defense courses, but have to find them in my part of Maine.

    What do police folk do as far as range time? I imagine when they're at the academy it's pretty intensive, but once they are in the routine of being a cop, how often do they practice? Thanks for any input you gentlemen care to offer.
    Well, I always tell my students that you should practice with your carry firearm routinely, if your new to carrying and to hand guns, you need to practice a lot, I would say at least once a week NO LESS than once every two weeks. When you have to use your firearm, god forbid you ever do, when fight or flight takes over and your adrenalin starts pumping you would probably not hit your attacker even from 10-15 feet away, which is the average distance when you get attacked or a gun fight breaks out. Have you ever seen the news clips on TV when police officers and bad guys shoot at each other and neither one of them hit each other? Thats why.
    I have found that 80% of my concealed weapons students that walk through the door honestly think they do not have to practice and there would be no way in hell they could miss 10-15 FT away. a lot of them also think they can handle themselves with no problem in a situation like that and the justification is normally "because its my life or theirs". Its never that simple, even defending yourself, a lot goes through your head in such a short time. Thats why you need to practice routinely so muscle memory takes over and you kind of automatically do things when the situation calls for it.

    If you have any other questions, feel free to contact me.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    State of Confusion
    Posts
    7,733
    Ideally twice per month. At least once if that's all you can get in. I recommend students fire one snap cap for every live round. That means homeowrk. Put a target on a safe wall and practice the fundamentals (grip, position, sight picture/sight alignment, trigger control, follow through). Focus on smooth & even trigger control. If you have a laser even better. You can observe poor trigger control by the laser point. Do I have to say it???? ---- no live ammo in the room!
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    Ideally twice per month. At least once if that's all you can get in. I recommend students fire one snap cap for every live round. That means homeowrk. Put a target on a safe wall and practice the fundamentals (grip, position, sight picture/sight alignment, trigger control, follow through). Focus on smooth & even trigger control. If you have a laser even better. You can observe poor trigger control by the laser point. Do I have to say it???? ---- no live ammo in the room!
    Dry fire practice is a great idea. Front Site training institute actually has published a manual of drills for dry fire training. I would be curious to read such a manual.

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