Concealed Carry Class
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Thread: Concealed Carry Class

  1. #1
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    Concealed Carry Class

    Hello my fellow firearms enthusiasts,
    I am a firearms instructor in the State of Oklahoma. Certified by the NRA for Basic Pistol and RSO. Additionally I am certified by the State (OSBI and CLEET) to teach Concealed Carry (Self Defense Act).
    The problem I am having is getting off the ground after having my licensing for some time now i finally found a spot where i can teach my classes. This leaves me with the issue now of creating a presentation and practicing it.

    What advice do you have for those getting off the ground? Would anyone be willing to provide their presentation for our community to review and use as a resource to better help those getting off the ground?

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  3. #2
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    If the state of OK doesn't have a required course curriculum like the state of UT, then I would recommend teaching the NRA Basic Pistol course, and upon completion of the course make it clear to the students that the NRA portion of the class is over, then teach specifics to OK and CC as required by OK law.
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  4. #3
    Hi there, nodaywithout.

    First, you need to register and get your instructor tab like me. :P People won't think you're cool or anything...but they will feel much freer to argue with you and try to prove you wrong, so you'll get lots of practice researching topics. And you'll also learn a lot about at which point you should withdraw from a debate! :)

    My advice for starters...go with the pre-packaged NRA powerpoint slides that come with the course lesson plan. While not perfect, they're really good - and the lesson plan references them in the margin notes. Once you've learned more about powerpoint (which I need to do), you can delete repetitious slides, insert supplemental information, etc.

    Beyond that - spend a bit on posters and other training aids that are relevant to your course.

    If you want REAL good practice, put together a test class of family and friends. It is especially helpful if you find experienced shooters or other folks who havve had the class before, and can audit it. Either cover the cost yourself for the materials, or give them class "at cost" - then get their feedback, whether verbal or written, at each 15-min break.

    Good luck.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  5. #4
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    Good info to start off with looking for as much info as I can get. Oklahoma has a specific coriculum which can make it difficult

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by nodaywithout View Post
    Good info to start off with looking for as much info as I can get. Oklahoma has a specific coriculum which can make it difficult
    If OK has a specific curriculum, then that's what you should be teaching. Provide the students with whatever handouts, etc you are required to under current state law. Many manufacturers will provide literature upon request. You could provide that to your students as well.

    Good luck!
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Gain View Post
    Hi there, nodaywithout.

    First, you need to register and get your instructor tab like me. :P People won't think you're cool or anything...but they will feel much freer to argue with you and try to prove you wrong, so you'll get lots of practice researching topics. And you'll also learn a lot about at which point you should withdraw from a debate! :) -quote clipped here-
    Something i should learn! Sometimes even calling a diamond a diamond will cause philisophical hysteria!
    1)"When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty." -Thomas Jefferson.
    2)"Imagine how gun control might be stomped if GOA or SAF had the (compromising) NRA's 4 million members!" -Me. http://jpfo.org/filegen-n-z/nraletter.htm

  8. Same as what the above have stated, but I would like to add the following:

    Practice your presentation several times until you feel confident not to read word for word on the NRA PowerPoint slides. Get a person who isn't a family member to sit in the class and give you feedback. Also, take classes from other instructors to see what they're doing, and ask if you can assist them. This has helped me tremendously.

    Get as many people from the community as possible such as lawyers, police officers, and a judge if possible.

    Advertise your strengths, but make yourself personable. For example, "I've been shooting for several years and a dad of three."

    Start off with a small class size at first, and get serious feedback from your students. Tell your students to take notes on how you can improve, and inform them you will call them back a week later - I've found it easier to get better feedback if you wait.

    Lastly, stay safe and have fun!

  9. #8
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    Very good info samuel thank you sir.


    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel View Post
    Same as what the above have stated, but I would like to add the following:

    Practice your presentation several times until you feel confident not to read word for word on the NRA PowerPoint slides. Get a person who isn't a family member to sit in the class and give you feedback. Also, take classes from other instructors to see what they're doing, and ask if you can assist them. This has helped me tremendously.

    Get as many people from the community as possible such as lawyers, police officers, and a judge if possible.

    Advertise your strengths, but make yourself personable. For example, "I've been shooting for several years and a dad of three."

    Start off with a small class size at first, and get serious feedback from your students. Tell your students to take notes on how you can improve, and inform them you will call them back a week later - I've found it easier to get better feedback if you wait.

    Lastly, stay safe and have fun!

  10. #9
    The most important thing an instructor must do is know the material inside and out. When you are confident and can respond to any question without thumbing through the lesson plan, you will have done your job.

    Don't ever let them see you sweat because things can go downhill from there.

    Remember that you are the authority in the classroom and you have to control the 'know it all's', but, it has to be done with kid gloves, you can't become the 'know it all'. If it means stepping out of the room on a break for some words with your problem child, then don't be afraid or ashamed to do it. It is YOUR class.

    There will be questions at times where there is no cut and dried, always correct answer. Don't stumble there, just explain why there is no always correct answer and don't think you should know everything even if there is no real good answer.

    I like to say that if I can't dazzel them with brilliance, I baffle them with BS.

    Don't really do this, it's just a cute saying but someone will always be there to call you on the BS. This type of class has no room for BS unless everyone understands that it is. You have to keep things lite to keep folks attention.

    Your techinques will develop over time. You will see what works for your style of teaching and what doesn't.

    Remember that above all else, YOU are the expert so make sure you know the subject inside and out.

    This site is a good place to get the crap knocked out of you. Run some of your idea's from time to time on here and you'll see what works and what doesn't. The other thing to know on here is who to listen to and who will give you crap just because they can. I still haven't got a good handle on that portion but I learn more and more every day. There are some scarey guys here and some even have the instructor tab. EEEEK!

    Just a suggestion, take it with a grain of salt. I may be one of the one's you want to stay clear of:):)

    KK

  11. #10
    I took the class for the second time a couple of months ago. I am also experienced in training large groups of people (safety related, not firearms). I know Oklahoma has set material that you must cover. If I may offer my suggestions just from what I have observed in the class and what I know from teaching others. Cover the material in an easy pace, dont talk fast and be prepared to answer questions from both experienced shooters and novices who have yet to pick up a gun. Also, please, do not tell hours of personal stories about yourself. You will lose the class and lose credibility. Make it fun, interactive if you can. Ask the class questions and get them involved. Time will pass quickly if everyone is engaged and having fun with what they are learning. Good luck Sir.

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