When did the police department change?
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Thread: When did the police department change?

  1. #1
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    When did the police department change?

    I have all ready banged heads with some of the other members between our opinions on police. While I will still hold my stance, I understand I have not been old enough, long enough, to see how the police department has changed over the years. I am asking this question, geared more toward the older carrying group that visits this forum.

    I recently visited the police department, voluntarily, and they had a case of old police memorabilia. Although I do not believe this is the case anymore, at some point the public view on police was good, and in some towns still is. They were known to be noble, brave, and honorable. I truly believe that was the case before my generation.

    When in your lifetime, do you believe the police department changed their reputation? When was the last time you smiled, and were greeted with a smile back from a police officer? When was the last time a police officer came to your surroundings, and you could shake their hand and say good day?

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  3. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighterchen View Post
    I have all ready banged heads with some of the other members between our opinions on police. While I will still hold my stance, I understand I have not been old enough, long enough, to see how the police department has changed over the years. I am asking this question, geared more toward the older carrying group that visits this forum.

    I recently visited the police department, voluntarily, and they had a case of old police memorabilia. Although I do not believe this is the case anymore, at some point the public view on police was good, and in some towns still is. They were known to be noble, brave, and honorable. I truly believe that was the case before my generation.

    When in your lifetime, do you believe the police department changed their reputation? When was the last time you smiled, and were greeted with a smile back from a police officer? When was the last time a police officer came to your surroundings, and you could shake their hand and say good day?
    I think it is still that way with 95% of police officers. The problem is that since Al Gore invented the internet, all we hear about are the small minority of cops that are bad.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  4. #3
    I think it was back around 1996. And definitely after Columbine in 1999, society was changing. Police departments developed SWAT teams with full military gear. Schools started installing metal detectors, and security cameras. George Bush, Richard Cheney, and Donald Rumsfeld organized the Project for the New American Century espousing beliefs that the U.S. should force everyone to accept our beliefs or be crushed by our military.
    "The 2nd amendment was never intended to allow private citizens to 'keep and bear arms'. If it had, there would have been wording such as 'the right of the People to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed'." -- Ken Konecki on Usenet, on 27 Jul 1992

  5. #4
    I always wave at the police, and my daughter makes a point of it, also. It makes their day when a 9-year-old kid says "I hope you're having a good day, officer! Thanks for taking care of us!" Cops are used to people constantly lying to them and treating them as though they are enemies because they are doing their job, so I guarantee when you greet a policeman they ALWAYS smile -- at least they do to me.

    My daughter has been raised to believe that if you are in trouble, you go to the police because they're our friends. Too many kids have lousy relatives who break the law and then are brought up to believe that the police are mean and lock people up. Well, duh -- look at who raised them!

    As a side note, I think that stuff about "Bush having beliefs" that everyone needs to believe what we do or be crushed is a conspiracy theory and not helpful. In short, treat cops as you would like to be treated, and tell them the truth, and you won't have a problem. At 58 years old I've made it this far without being cuffed and thrown in a cell, so I suppose I must be doing something right.

  6. #5
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    I think I'm considered a youngster, at least around these parts, but I used to love when my grandfather would tell me stories of being a deputy in a small town.

    One involved busting a party of underage drinkers. Instead of knocking heads, he just quietly went around to all the cars and disconnected the distributor caps so no one could drive home.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighterchen View Post
    .......<snipped for brevity......?When in your lifetime, do you believe the police department changed their reputation? When was the last time you smiled, and were greeted with a smile back from a police officer? When was the last time a police officer came to your surroundings, and you could shake their hand and say good day?
    So far here in my little countyship, the only regret I have is that they lowered the numbers of police and firefighters. The last time I spoke to a policeman was a little over two weeks ago when we have a storm and noticed a truck passing by our street. Hubby and I went out and looked at what was happening a little bit far away from where the "accident" was. Then we saw a police car turned around his car on a driveway so he can get out of there. We waved at him not really expecting him to stop but he did and he told us what happened. We didn't recognized him because it was a bit dark at the time. Then he started chatting us up remembering the almost-the-same incident when a lightning hit the top of our fireplace. He was the one who actually attended to us. Then we said our goodbyes...We love our police here where we live. They are almost always prompt and polite and likeable. But NOT when they are investigating something though. They are nice but detached during those times...
    "Don't let the door hit ya where the dawg shudda bit ya!"
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  8. #7
    Sorry folks, my last couple of interactions with the police have been a bit unpleasent, so much so that i called someone I know in the department, a longtime detective, i told him what was going on, and he said he would talk to the one in perticular, I said I hope so before he messes with me on he wrong day and I give him a reason

  9. #8
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    I just turned 56 Saturday and I believe most cops are friendly and I have no problem. saying hi and having a general conversation with them. I even have some cops who I call friend, and some in the family. But there are too many of the other kind that give a bad name to the good cops and make their job harder. I have to admit though I have noticed a change in police behavior in the late 70s'. I noticed that with at least some(NOT ALL) departments there seemed to be an attitude change toward the civil population, some departments treating citizens as sheep and a patronizing attitude. Some of the change may be in part a result of the 'down with the pigs' garbage of the late 60s' and early 70s'. Some cops(not all) also have a sense of superiority over citizens and feel their position makes them better at making decisions particularly in the matter of carrying guns and I saw alot of that in California. Of course the liberal education that many cops recieve today is also a factor. I am NOT anti cop. I have to admire the beat cop who responds to a prowler call and risks his(her) life in the process. And of course too many cops have given up their lives while on duty. As with all lines of work there are good ones and bad ones. I EXPECT ALL LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS TO RESPECT ME AND TO OBEY THE LAW AS WE ARE REQUIRED TO. No exceptions.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by santa View Post
    ... I have to admit though I have noticed a change in police behavior in the late 70s'. I noticed that with at least some(NOT ALL) departments there seemed to be an attitude change toward the civil population, some departments treating citizens as sheep and a patronizing attitude. Some of the change may be in part a result of the 'down with the pigs' garbage of the late 60s' and early 70s'. Some cops(not all) also have a sense of superiority over citizens and feel their position makes them better at making decisions particularly in the matter of carrying guns and I saw alot of that in California. Of course the liberal education that many cops recieve today is also a factor.
    I think you're right on target with the time frame. It's no coincidence that in the late 60s and early 70s is when the drug culture in the US was really ramping up. No longer was it just a few fringe hippies smoking some weed and tripping on a little acid. Suddenly the US culture was HUNGRY for narcotics, and rivers of substances began flowing from Mexico and South America, and new crap was being cooked up in underground labs as well. Cocaine, heroin, meth, quaaludes, LSD, PCP - you name it, a MUCH larger portion of the US public than ever before was consuming the stuff.

    With the accelerated consumption (particularly in urban areas) from the late 60s and up into the 80s, came all the insanity that went along with it. Overdoses. Erratic and violent behavior from those who were high. Well-armed gangs and organized crime selling the stuff. Murders. All sorts of horror and mayhem. In order to combat this problem, police had to start acting more like soldiers. Even their uniforms and equipment started looking more like Army.

    Now granted, I'm only 38 - born in 1972. But this is my understanding of events, and if correct, goes a long way towards explaining when and why police attitudes changed towards the civilian population.

    But - as before - police are going to have to get used to a new reality. LEGAL firearm sales are on the rise. More states than ever are recognizing the right of a citizen to be armed. Firearms are no longer just in the hands of criminals. While in 1974 it may have been reasonable to assume a man with a gun was either a cop, criminal, or Texan - this is no longer a reasonable assumption today. Now more than ever, police will have to sharpen their skills and distinguish assailants from defenders, lawfully armed citizens from illegally armed criminals.

    Let us hope they will rise to the occasion.
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  11. #10
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    Sounds like the first step on the long road back to a police force that wasn't a clone of a National Guard would be to decriminalize all forms of self-medication.
    When they "Nudge. Shove. Shoot.",
    Don't retreat. Just reload.

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