LEO Couldn't Open D/A Revolver Cylinder - Page 3
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 49

Thread: LEO Couldn't Open D/A Revolver Cylinder

  1. #21
    Unfortunately, many new hires have never handled any firearms prior to Law Enforcement. Then LEO training hasn't the propensity or inclination or supplies to teach the new hires any information that is presumed to be unneeded... but that doesn't mean they shouldn't be sent thru the Evidence/Property Room to be shown how one is rendered safe if needed.

    Also, per the original post, the Cop was probably either working a part time/off duty gig or may have even been an Explorer. Some of the prime off duty gigs can go to the most inexperienced but most politically connected/reality ignorant "House" badges... :08:
    **DumbAss Alert**: Global Warming is a SCAM, brought to you by a few activist scientists and a consensus of Politicians who you should know better than to trust.

    "You have no idea how desperate you will be not to be ‘over'... You think you do, but you can't possibly know... until you're there..." ~ (paraphrased) Wm Shatner as "Denny Crane, Boston Legal"

    "To disarm the people is the best way to enslave them..."~George Mason

  2.   
  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Creeker View Post
    Unfortunately, many new hires have never handled any firearms prior to Law Enforcement. Then LEO training hasn't the propensity or inclination or supplies to teach the new hires any information that is presumed to be unneeded... but that doesn't mean they shouldn't be sent thru the Evidence/Property Room to be shown how one is rendered safe if needed.

    Also, per the original post, the Cop was probably either working a part time/off duty gig or may have even been an Explorer. Some of the prime off duty gigs can go to the most inexperienced but most politically connected/reality ignorant "House" badges... :08:
    You bring up a very good point there. I'm sure if it was true in this case or not, but I do remember a gun show a few years ago that used Explorer type pre officers. And, true training does tend to assume more than it should sometimes. Either way, the individual in question now knows. :)
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1

    Lightbulb I'm surprised...

    I'm a little surprised that No One in this thread has asked the $60,000 question. Please do not take my question and comment as an attack, rather take away a lesson learned in Safe Firearms Handling. (The glass is always Half Full) :bigsmile:


    The Question:
    Why are you handing a firearm to somene that is not Unloaded, Open, and ready for inspection?


    Lesson:
    NEVER hand a firearm to anyone without First making it safe, and ready for inspection. (This includes opening the Cylinder, Slide, or Bolt)

  5. #24

    As a courtesy

    didn't you think of handing the revolver to her already open?

    Cheers
    Joe

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by VaBigDog View Post
    I'm a little surprised that No One in this thread has asked the $60,000 question. Please do not take my question and comment as an attack, rather take away a lesson learned in Safe Firearms Handling. (The glass is always Half Full) :bigsmile:


    The Question:
    Why are you handing a firearm to somene that is not Unloaded, Open, and ready for inspection?


    Lesson:
    NEVER hand a firearm to anyone without First making it safe, and ready for inspection. (This includes opening the Cylinder, Slide, or Bolt)

    In most cases I will hand a firearm with the action open and "safe". I've observed many folks at gun shows who are not as safety concious as I am, nor do they practice firearms handling the way I do. There are some folks who will clear the firearm, close the action and hand it to you. This is common at many of the gun shops I've visited. When accepting the firearm, I open the action to confirm that it's safe. When I'm done, I'll hand the firearm back with the action open whenever possible. There are some revolvers that require you to remove the cylinder for loading purposes. In this case, I'll ensure that the firearm is safe before handing it to another person with the action closed.

    Good point in asking why the firearm wasn't handed to the officer with the action open. I also wonder why the officer couldn't figure out how to render the firearm "safe". I can imagine that if she were to find a firearm at a crime scene that she would need to know how to open the action. I have yet to encounter a BG that leaves guns lying around with the action open.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  7. #26
    Good point!!! I can't think of a time that I have not handed my gun to someone without the action open. The only time was at a gun show, I pulled the gun out of my holster and proceded to clear, but the cop at the door got itchy me handling the gun so I just gave it to him. You know because obviously he was the only one who could handle the gun safetly. I don't think that is the case here, but this does happens sometimes. Its a good point though. I get cranky at the gun stores when they don't do that automatically. I'm going to recheck when I get the gun, but its good practice on both sides ALWAYS
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
    ---Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Santa Teresa
    Posts
    104
    If the firearm had been a semi-auto, I would have cleared it and left the slide open. However,
    since it was a revolver I cleared it, closed the cylinder, reversed the grip in my hand and
    handed it to the officer grip forward.

    As is often stated about 20-20 hindsight, I realize now I should have left the cylinder open.
    My excuse is that I was sure the police officer would know how to open it. It never occurred
    to me that someone in uniform with a badge would not know how to safely handle a revolver.

    It took much less time to do it than to explain it here.

    The next time, I'll not assume that police officers know anything about anything.

    Thank you.
    The Second Amendment is NOT about hunting!

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    This is an excellent demonstration of how some LEO, though "well qualified" and "well trained" still lack certain skills. I don't profess to be an expert in firearms by any means, but if I ever got my hands on a firearm that I couldn't figure out, and the owner was standing right in front of me, I would not hesitate to ask them to open the action for me.

    There's nothing wrong with asking, though I see a huge fault in someone who insists on being stubborn and "figuring it out" for themselves. That's how "accidents" often happen.

    I'll bet that this "teachable moment" was shared with at least a couple of her fellow officers, and I'm sure that they'll be brushing up on their knowledge of revolvers.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. I was at the local "eat stop" for the LEO's at the Academy and one of the local "SWAT Jocks" saw my GP100 being open carried. He pointed and said something to his co-worker, who said, "You carry a Revolver?"

    I looked at him and replied, "Yes, I hit what I aim at." :D I then walked away.

    I knew a couple of them, and they knew I am an LEO, but I was off duty at the time.

    Biker

  11. #30
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    3

    Thumbs up retired LFO

    yes I saw some of the things memtioned here and some that --well we had an LFO who could not see very well--so when it came time to qualify someone had to shoot his target so he would qualify---not funny but we all knew and he walked on the main drag and never got any calls for anything(old ready to retire)--he used a S&W
    38 4" with a bull barrel(it was retired to junk after he left--could not get it open). I hope the new guys are getting better tranining now. But with the comments posted I wonder, and people ask why I carry a gun all the time. :omg:

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast