You have to read this. - Page 5
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Thread: You have to read this.

  1. In cases like these, both parties can be at fault: the carrier for possibly being too defensive and the LEO for being too aggressive. I've known a fair share of power-abusing cops, but I'm sure they are just trying to protect themselves. Just because they are LEOs doesn't mean they're not ignorant, unfortunately.

  2.   
  3. #42
    Wow

  4. #43
    Like I said in the thread of the girl getting beaten in a cell. Cops are pretty much organized street gangs with paychecks. They steal, rape, and sometimes get away with murder as we have seen over and over again on the news. I might be able to see their point in SOME instances, like the kid in NH a few years ago who was harassed by a town cop for so long he finally shot him to death. You can see the arrogance in this cops demeanor as he pepper sprays the kid in this video just before the kid guns him down. He just has that "I'm the law when will you learn" attitude. Well, he did have.

    Cop fatally shot and then has dying body driven over (By skiing star Bode Miller's cousin) - AOL Video


    It's a long complicated story leading up to this day, but if the kid had lived he might have gotten off with a self defense plea. Who knows.
    You can run... but you'll just die tired. 3%

  5. I use to work for a private company that taught marksmanship to various law enforcement agencys and military security units.
    I can tell you that half the cops i trained could not shoot worth a ****!

    I can tell you most of the military security units were in better physical shape.

    I still cannot get use to calling a cop a non-civillian. to me cops are civillians.

  6. #45
    Trying to stay on topic.

    I'm a retired police sergeant from a big city, and also a retired military policemen (active duty and guard).

    I was a CCW holder prior to appointment as a police officer and also after retirement.

    As a police officer I conducted over a thousand car stops per year (no exaggeration).

    I expected that EVERYONE I came into contact with was armed with some type of weapon. When I would pull over a person that would voluntarily admit that they had a CCW, I would just say "no problem, thanks" or "ok".

    Where I had worked, I never heard any police officer acting like what was descibed in those posts.

    As a POLICE OFFICER when you are on-duty in civlian clothes, or off-duty, you are told that if you are involved in any incident, the UNIFORMED officers are in charge and you WILL comply with their instructions. I would suggest the same for anyone else.

    Cops are like anyone else in your work place, you have smart ones, funny ones, quiet ones, etc., then you have the axxholes. Expect that someday you'll run into the axxhole. I have.

    I have had the chance to travel to many different parts of the U.S. and I know in certain parts especially small rural areas, that there is dissention between neighboring departments, and the police in these areas treat other police they encounter in a very unfriendly manner.

    My advice if stopped by the polce, would be to pull over in a safe area so the cop won't get hit by a passing car (even if that means using the highway exit if there is no shoulder), roll all your windows down, turn on your dome light at night, keep your hands on the top of the steering wheel, say "Hi officer" and then wait for him/her to talk. Do not argue with him/her. Do not mention your CCW unless specifically asked.

    If you were speeding or doing something wrong ADMIT IT (with genuine remorse). The handful of people that admitted what they had actually done (and I don't mean saying "well I thought I was only going 10mph over the limit" when in reality you were doing 24mph over) I let off with a warning. Why, because when the officer tells you he saw you do something and you tell him you didn't, you are calling him a liar. How does it make you feel when your kids do that to you?

    I would recommend the admittance of guilt only for non-criminal (ie., traffic violations) incidents.

    If you have any problems with an officer be kind to him/her, remember as much info as possible and then go to the police station and make a report, or write a letter to the chief.

    If you are having a severe problem with an officer comply with his/her instructions and politely ask for their supervisor to respond. Call 911 if neccessary. Cooperate and let your lawyer handle any civil rights violations later.

    Just remember never to lose your cool, because it is much harder to de-escalate a situation.

    Be safe.
    Last edited by chroode; 03-14-2009 at 04:49 PM. Reason: spelling

  7. #46
    I don't have much of a problem with them wanting to secure the firearm, I get it. What I do have a problem with is their disdain for lawful CCW holders, or at least the arrogant tone of their responce to the poor dude's concerns. Some of the ones who say "sure you have the right to ..." (in an arrogant and sarchastic tone) are the same ones who say "I'm gonna take your gun, deal with it".

    If I am pulled over and the cop wants to secure my gun, sure I'll deal with it. I'll be compleatly courteous and compliant during the stop because, among other things, I got places to be and don't have spare time to **** around on the side of the road (probably why I got pulled over in the first place.) However, I expect the same amount of courtesy from the officer, weather I am armed or not.

    Maybe these LEOs are courteous during their encounters with legal CCW holders, but their posts surely did not give me that impression. I'll acknowledge that they may not represent the majority of LEOs. But there were certainly more arrogant ones than there were reasonable ones on the forum.

  8. #47
    thedoc96 Guest

    Probably...

    Quote Originally Posted by chroode View Post
    Trying to stay on topic.

    I'm a retired police sergeant from a big city, and also a retired military policemen (active duty and guard).

    I was a CCW holder prior to appointment as a police officer and also after retirement.

    As a police officer I conducted over a thousand car stops per year (no exaggeration).

    I expected that EVERYONE I came into contact with was armed with some type of weapon. When I would pull over a person that would voluntarily admit that they had a CCW, I would just say "no problem, thanks" or "ok".

    Where I had worked, I never heard any police officer acting like what was descibed in those posts.

    As a POLICE OFFICER when you are on-duty in civlian clothes, or off-duty, you are told that if you are involved in any incident, the UNIFORMED officers are in charge and you WILL comply with their instructions. I would suggest the same for anyone else.

    Cops are like anyone else in your work place, you have smart ones, funny ones, quiet ones, etc., then you have the axxholes. Expect that someday you'll run into the axxhole. I have.

    I have had the chance to travel to many different parts of the U.S. and I know in certain parts especially small rural areas, that there is dissention between neighboring departments, and the police in these areas treat other police they encounter in a very unfriendly manner.

    My advice if stopped by the polce, would be to pull over in a safe area so the cop won't get hit by a passing car (even if that means using the highway exit if there is no shoulder), roll all your windows down, turn on your dome light at night, keep your hands on the top of the steering wheel, say "Hi officer" and then wait for him/her to talk. Do not argue with him/her. Do not mention your CCW unless specifically asked.

    If you were speeding or doing something wrong ADMIT IT (with genuine remorse). The handful of people that admitted what they had actually done (and I don't mean saying "well I thought I was only going 10mph over the limit" when in reality you were doing 24mph over) I let off with a warning. Why, because when the officer tells you he saw you do something and you tell him you didn't, you are calling him a liar. How does it make you feel when your kids do that to you?

    I would recommend the admittance of guilt only for non-criminal (ie., traffic violations) incidents.

    If you have any problems with an officer be kind to him/her, remember as much info as possible and then go to the police station and make a report, or write a letter to the chief.

    If you are having a severe problem with an officer comply with his/her instructions and politely ask for their supervisor to respond. Call 911 if neccessary. Cooperate and let your lawyer handle any civil rights violations later.

    Just remember never to lose your cool, because it is much harder to de-escalate a situation.

    Be safe.


    The most commons sense advice I have heard so far...sorry didnt read all posts tho!

  9. #48
    thedoc96 Guest

    Footnote

    One guy stated that carrying was a privilege. WRONG!!! Of course I will surrender my weapon to a LEO. He is doing his JOB. But I resent the implication that he is doing me a favor when he gives it back. The implication that I dont have a right to be carrying my weapon in the first place and that the only reason I am is a fact LE would rather didnt exist. Sorry LEOs I am a citizen and I have rights!!

  10. #49
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    Reasonable vs. Unreasonable

    Quote Originally Posted by FN1910 View Post
    I don't really think that these posts represent even a small minority of LEO's and wonder at times if those even are LEO to start with. However the attitudes range all over the place on how to handle anything. For instance watch this and see how you would handle it if you were a LEO and if you were the one being stopped. Usually the most vocal ones about these types of things are in the minority whether right or wrong. If this has been posted before I apologize but......

    https://www.checkpointusa.org/DHS/video/BPRoadblock.wmv
    When asked a reasonable question by a LEO at a traffic stop (like it or not, ICE is Law Enforcement), it is our responsibility and duty to answer it. One of those reasonable questions is identification.

    This guy was clearly looking for a fight. The officers at this scene would have been within their rights to arrest the driver. The term "being detained" has very specific legal meanings, and being stopped so an officer can question you is not one of them.

    The difference between being educated in English and being educated in Law...
    Fred's News
    "I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." - - Thomas Jefferson, 1791

  11. #50
    if a cop slams me on my hood just because i have a CCW he is gonna have alot more to worry about than my pistol on y side... its called a lawyer
    All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing

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