Non-participant in LEO shootings - Page 3
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Thread: Non-participant in LEO shootings

  1. Would you submit to a dna test at road block? Like the ones that have been Colorado.

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    somewhere in north texas
    Posts
    599

    Cool no!!

    not unless it was ordered by the courts. this would seem to be in violation of the 4th amendment.

  4. Leo Encounter

    What 4th amendment rights? The "Protect America" act dissolved those. So now your Rights can be violated whenever the government or police want to.
    On the plus side, a Federal Appeals Court said it was unconstitutional & this may be going to the Supreme Court.

    Either way, government is trying awfully hard these days to destroy our constitutional & God-given Rights. It is up to we, the people to stop the destruction of our country from within.
    Last edited by robiewan; 11-07-2007 at 03:00 PM. Reason: spelling

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by iceman70 View Post
    I've been a policeman for fifteen years in Michigan. For the most part police officers are not worried about CCW license holders as opposed to criminals with guns. As long as you are up front with him/her you should be just fine.

    When you start acting paranoid and bringing attention to yourself, the police officer might start getting a little jumpy. As a person who also carries a gun you know that guns don't go off by themselves. Contrary to popular belief police officers don't just shoot people. Especially not law abiding people who just happen to be lawfully carrying a gun.:)

    Rob
    +1 on this - as a retired LEO, I can sure attest to this comment. I've participated in a number of stops where the driver (or a passenger) was a permit holder. I can honestly say I've never had a problem with any of them - and, in most cases, they were careful to inform me that they were carrying and were only too willing to show their permit.

    Good advise here......
    If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you; that is the principal difference between a dog and a man.


    Mark Twain

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    I've always found "Yes, sir", "No, sir" and "Thank you, sir" to be the best ways of dealing with officers during traffic stops. :)

    Once I was the victim of a hit-and-run (this was before I was carrying in my car) and the police came and helped to escort me and my destroyed car to a strip mall parking lot. They then gave me a ride home, but also wrote me a ticket for not having my driver's license with me. I was really grateful to them anyway. Also, riding in the police car was quite enlightening.

    A few days later, I got a call from one of them who asked if I could meet him during his lunch hour because he had forgotten to put some piece of information on the ticket, and he would get in trouble if he didn't. I did, of course. When I went to pay the ticket at the Tax Collector's office, it had been expunged.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Иєш Лєяжşєşŧăŋ
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    Originally Posted by iceman70
    I've been a policeman for fifteen years in Michigan. For the most part police officers are not worried about CCW license holders as opposed to criminals with guns. As long as you are up front with him/her you should be just fine.

    When you start acting paranoid and bringing attention to yourself, the police officer might start getting a little jumpy. As a person who also carries a gun you know that guns don't go off by themselves. Contrary to popular belief police officers don't just shoot people. Especially not law abiding people who just happen to be lawfully carrying a gun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hacker15 View Post
    +1 on this - as a retired LEO, I can sure attest to this comment. I've participated in a number of stops where the driver (or a passenger) was a permit holder. I can honestly say I've never had a problem with any of them - and, in most cases, they were careful to inform me that they were carrying and were only too willing to show their permit.
    I appreciate the comments and sentiments of both'a you guys, and I'm very pro-cop. I believe that most cops are fine people doing a hard job under difficult circumstances, at best. But I think you'll both agree that the Police Force is made up of people, and people are all different. For as many guys as there are like you, there are many others who're looking for a reason to bust your chops, or are digging for a "good bust", and would love to have you step just this far out of line . . . real or imagined . . . to give them an excuse. There are also many who totally disagree with your position on concealed carry by civilians and will make life difficult for you just because they can. For some...again, I'm sure you'll agree...a badge and a gun are a license to Lord it over anyone who looks like a good target. It may be that the maxim my wife lives by . . . "If you look like food, you will be eaten!" . . . holds true in this area moreso even than on the street.

    Thanks for you two being on "our" side, though.
    NRA Life; GOA Life; CCRKBA Life; Trustee, NJCSD; F&AM: 32 & KT
    The Only Answer to a Bad Guy with a Gun - Is a Good Guy with a Gun!
    When Seconds Count...The Police are only MINUTES Away!

  8. #27

    As for me

    I have never been pulled over while carrying but have had about a half-dozen encounters with the police. None in arrest situations (at least not ME being arrested), 1 from a car (I approached them), a couple of walkups (street situations), 2 station visits and a house visit. In all of these events I immediately informed the officer that I was carrying and provided ID and license. Never had a real problem with any of them. One officer gave me a mini-lecture about he hoped I was responsible in exercising my rights (not the least trace of sarcasm) and then said, "I DO need to ask you one question, Under what curcumstances would you pull that gun out and use it?" I answered in an acceptable fashion.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
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    2,797

    If "legal", don't worry....

    I have carry permits for several states as a requirement for my line of work. I've had numerous encounters with LEO in various states while I was legally carrying. For the most part, the LEO have always been professional and courteous. At the beginning of the encounter, I provide the LEO with my identification and carry permit for that state. I'm usually asked a few questions and I'm sent off on my way. In one circumstance I had a problem with a LEO in AZ. He was thought that I needed to be a FL resident for the permit to be valid in AZ. This happened at a DUI roadblock. I don't drink, don't use any other "substances", no prescription drugs, etc., so no need to worry about being "under the influence" of anything other than my Starbuck's coffee or a few cans of Diet Pepsi. In any case, I was the unlucky "random" car that was pulled over. Following my SOP with any traffic stop, I pulled over where instructed, turned on my 4 way flashers and interior dome lights. The LEO asked for my license, registration, etc, so along with the automobile documents, I handed over my DL and CCW Permit for FL (Florida's permit is valid in AZ). At this point the LEO asks if I was "armed". I respond with "Yes officer, I have two firearms in concealed holsters." At this point the LEO orders me to reach out of the window with my right hand and open the door. I'm then instructed to keep my hands "where I can see them". I open the door, then follow the next instruction to reach over with my left hand and unbuckle my seat belt. I follow that instruction and then get the next one, "Step out of the vehicle and place your hands on the hood". I do this and LEO begins to go into his "frisking routine", asking "where are your weapons" and if I have any other "weapons" on me, etc. As I'm getting my "pat down", he secures my firearms. After the "pat down", I'm handcuffed and told to sit next to my vehicle. Another LEO comes over to assist, and the two step away to have a conversation. The initial LEO goes off somewhere, and the second LEO comes back, removes the handcuffs, hands me my paperwork, returns my firearms and apologizes for the misunderstanding. I ask him what the problem was, and he basically says the guy is new, and "made a mistake", and tells me that I'm "free to go". I return to my vehicle and re-holster my firearms, then proceed on my way.

    Other than the AZ encounter, I have had very little problems with LEO. I've had about a dozen or so encounters in which one case I actually drew my firearm on an aggressor. Only place where I receive "other than professional" encounters with LEO are here in Hawaii (conveniently where we're not allowed to carry). I never carry my firearm here in Hawaii. I follow all of the firearms laws to the best of my ability. I've had 2 problems with LEO involving firearms here in HI. Both times were in the same hunting area. Both instances were with Honolulu Police Officers. The current hunting laws allow you to carry your holstered handgun in the hunting area as long as it's not "concealed" in any way, and is exterior to any clothing, including rain gear. I always comply with the law. On two occasions, I've had officers detain me and threaten to arrest me because I have a handgun in violation of the "places to keep" law. Both times it took almost an hour to clear up. Both cases, the officer secured my handgun and had me sit on the pavement in handcuffs (one day in the hot sun with no shade or water!) In both cases it took my persistence to convince the officer to call his FTO, desk SGT or LT to clear things up. Don't know what the guy was doing in his car on the computer, but in both cases, a simple radio call cleared things up.

    Hope some day we'll be able to get some type of "shall issue" law passed here in Hawaii. I like the idea about folks writing to the Governor's office and various tourist groups about wanting to vacation elsewhere. If we can get enough support, then I'm sure we can get something done to fix the messed up laws here. Since many Hawaii residents vacation in NV, maybe we can get some sort of reciprocal law passed with NV??

  10. The unknown creates the stress in a stop. The officer's knowledge of your permit should help to reduce the stess and the unknown factor. Be professional and careful.

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