Person tased for getting out license too slowly - Page 3
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Thread: Person tased for getting out license too slowly

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by S&WM&P40 View Post
    Let us not forget the police work for US not the other way around.
    Let's just see how far you get trying to tell that to about 90% of the LEO's out there!!

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  3. Medical/Psychological Regulations for LEOs vary

    Quote Originally Posted by melloyello View Post
    Are LEO required to pass a medical and psychological test?
    I am not just talking a physical test which I know our City and County don't have to pass, just the shooting test and exam which is pretty much hand fed to them during training.
    It depends on the jurisdiction concerned. I certainly am not opposed to such requirements.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,675
    Unfortunately, just about every police department has jerks like this guy on them. What I don't like is that when there are clear cut abuse of authority incidents like this one, the departments are allowed to investigate themselves.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  5. #24
    Truth is there are bad people no matter where you look! They come in all shapes and sizes: some wear a badge, but you’ll also find them in education, ministry, farming, sports, politics, grocery stores… you even find some behind the counter at a gun range! :)

    One bad cop doesn’t make them all bad. There are a whole lot of good LEO’s, men and women who have dedicated their lives to protecting and serving the community. Just like there are a whole lot of good teachers, pastors, farmers… and so on!

    This particular officer might truly be a model policeman with an exemplary career. BUT, on this particular day, he was WAY OUT OF LINE! His conduct was unbecoming a LEO and the disciplinary action taken was inadequate at best.


    When Art Acevedo, the new chief from California, saw the video, he strongly disapproved of O’Connor’s action but saw in the footage what some would call “a teaching moment.” Chief Acevedo released the video, told officers to watch it, and made it clear that any officer who did the same as O’Connor would be in serious trouble. The chief’s warning was appropriate and welcome.

    But what’s genuinely encouraging is the reaction of officers who watched the video and not only disapproved — we think most officers would — but spoke up about the need for an apology, a personal apology. As professional law enforcement officers, they don’t want to be associated with the kind of behavior on display in the video.

    Acevedo said his standard for officer behavior is high. We think most officers already meet that standard. But we applaud the willingness to publicly acknowledge and apologize for failures to live up to that standard. (More)
    Blessed be my God, my mountain, who trains me to fight fair and well! Psalm 144 (msg)
    ...follow me at twitter.com/matthewaynelson

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Vegas View Post
    I knew a few of these type of officers...EVERY one of them were the guy picked on in school...I have respect for a handful of them but the job in itself seems to attract people that have been punked all their life. So they decide to get a gun and a badge and all the sudden they're somebody...but in reality when they go home after work they're still *******...
    Actually, police-work tends to attract people who ARE bullies and wife-beaters-- it's proven that police have an above-average level of domestic violence at home, and come from abusive homes. So they naturally seek jobs that give them a lot of power without accountability or high qualifiications. No other job lets you use deadly force in public, or forcibly abduct and imprison people, at your discretion-- and get away with ABUSING that discretion, without those things happening to you.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Kansas
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    44
    Quote Originally Posted by BradAnderson View Post
    Actually, police-work tends to attract people who ARE bullies and wife-beaters-- it's proven that police have an above-average level of domestic violence at home, and come from abusive homes. So they naturally seek jobs that give them a lot of power without accountability or high qualifiications. No other job lets you use deadly force in public, or forcibly abduct and imprison people, at your discretion-- and get away with ABUSING that discretion, without those things happening to you.

    Good Lord. I'm calling you out on this one. What "proof" do you have of these assertions? Post it up or retract your statement--because your assertions are utterly baseless. As a matter of fact, domestic abuse ("wife-beat[ing]") is an automatic disqualification for applicants to LE agencies (at least the ones I've been associated with).

    The fact is that the vast majority of LEOs are hard-working, dedicated, professionals. But, as with any group of people, a few jagoffs can give the whole group a bad name. This guy clearly crossed the line and was far too confrontational for no good reason; and then he committed a felonious assault, IMHO. He should have had his badge taken from him.

    But for every one out there like this guy there are a hundred (at least) who work their entire careers without ever once behaving anything close to this way.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by XD-Fender View Post
    Good Lord. I'm calling you out on this one. What "proof" do you have of these assertions? Post it up or retract your statement--because your assertions are utterly baseless.
    Domestic Violence in Police Families

    Domestic violence is 2 to 4 times more common in police families than in the general population. In two separate studies, 40% of police officers self-report that they have used violence against their domestic partners within the last year. In the general population, it's estimated that domestic violence occurs in about 10% of families.
    In a nationwide survey of 123 police departments, 45% had no specific policy for dealing with officer-involved domestic violence.
    In that same survey, the most common discipline imposed for a sustained allegation of domestic violence was counseling. Only 19% of departments indicated that officers would be terminated after a second sustained allegation of domestic violence.
    In San Diego, a national model in domestic violence prosecution, the City Attorney typically prosecutes 92% of referred domestic violence cases, but only 42% of cases where the batterer is a cop.


    So you're claim that it's "baseless" is what's baseless.

    As a matter of fact, domestic abuse ("wife-beat[ing]") is an automatic disqualification for applicants to LE agencies (at least the ones I've been associated with).
    APPLICANTS, but not active-duty. In other words, something that would disqualify someone from getting a job, doesn't COST them the job once they have it... kinda like tenure.
    Besides this only applies IF they're convicted-- which is a catch-22 since their bud-bud cops simply wont take a report on it; they also have their own little policies where they "don't get involved in these things" to protect victims of domestic violence who call-- cops use the Constitution as toilet-paper.

    The fact is that the vast majority of LEOs are hard-working, dedicated, professionals. But, as with any group of people, a few jagoffs can give the whole group a bad name.
    Yep: the 70% majority that ISN'T domestically abusive, are given a bad name when they PROTECT the 30% three-times population average that IS abusive.

    This guy clearly crossed the line and was far too confrontational for no good reason; and then he committed a felonious assault, IMHO. He should have had his badge taken from him.
    Oh yeah, he should get fired for committing a felony that Joe Schmoe would get sent to PRISON for-- geez, typical cop: "We ARE the law."

    But for every one out there like this guy there are a hundred (at least) who work their entire careers without ever once behaving anything close to this way.
    No, actually the statistics show that it's more like 2 or 3 (70%)-- and even these PROTECT the other 30%. I wasn't born yesterday bub.

    So next time you drop a challenge like that, try doing your homework.

  9. #28
    I sincerely hope that the cop lost his job over that. I doubt he did, but that's disturbing.

  10. #29
    HK Dan Guest
    Mods--please delete my screen name from the membership list.

    While what the officer did may have been excessive, the comments I just read by posters not relating to this incident are CERTAINLY excessive. I don't know where your prejudices came from, but I know that I don't need to be a part of your group if that's the way you look at life.

    Tschuss!

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