Case trimming
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Case trimming

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2

    Case trimming

    I have been reloading for 45acp for my 1911 for a while. However, I never really got into reloading for rifles. I have just recieved a set of dies for my 303 SMLE as an early birthday present. With my 45 I never had to worry about case trimming. Is this something that needs to be done with every reload or can I wait awhile before investing in a trimmer. If I need one right away what are some good low cost ones? The Mrs. says my shooting budget is limited to my VA disability checks ONLY.

  2.   
  3. #2
    If you are using new brass, don't trim until after you've fired it for the first time. You want the brass to stretch out. You should be checking all your once fired brass for length and trim as necessary to spec's for the rounds you are reloading. RCBS makes a good rotary case trimmer and it wont set you back to much in $$.

  4. #3
    Rifle brass should stay below the max length.

    Uniformity of length never hurts.

    Dillon makes the best case trimmer bar none! I trimmed two thousand 223 cases in a few short hours with NO arthritis flare-ups!

    -Doc

  5. #4
    Bottle neck shells need to be measured and trimmed if requred. Straight walled pisotl cartridges rarely need trimming. They just don't stretch like bottle neck cartidges do.

  6. You can get a LEE trimmer setup that can be used with a drill for under $20. I've used the LEE to trim many thousands of 223 brass using a cordless drill since it keeps my batteries cycling rather than laying unused all winter. The .303 is known for stretching cases and should be checked/trimmed after each loading.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast