Refinishing a Gun Stock [Large Images]
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Thread: Refinishing a Gun Stock [Large Images]

  1. Refinishing a Gun Stock [Large Images]

    I am trying to refinish a 30 year old gun stock but am running into some issues. I can't seem to get the dark discoloration out of the wood no matter how much sanding is involved.

    I applied a light stain after sanding it back down to the wood to see how it would show but I'm just not happy with it. Any ideas/help/advice? I want to restore this stocks glory and bring her back to life.



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  3. If the discoloration is oil or grease, I've had some success in the past drawing it out with acetone. It takes repeated treatments with a cloth soaked in acetone, but it will work if you spend enough time on it. Hope that helps. Pretty stock.

  4. After looking at the pictures more closely, it kinda looks like the discoloration is the original finish. That will have to be completely removed before you try to refinish it. You can either sand it off or use a chemical stripper. If it is poly urethane, it takes alot of work to get it off. Good luck.

  5. Thanks fox might have to try the Acetone. The original finish was already removed but I think the discolor was caused by my first "rookie" application by using a sponge brush instead of a lint free applicator. I think it might be due to it either soaking in to much stain the first time around or possible discoloration by residual stripper. The other side of the stock looks great but this left hand side is giving me hell.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    123
    1. It could just be the grain of the wood and the way it catches the light. 2. Could be the way the stain soaked in when you refinished it. If it is theis you will have to bleach out the stain if you can.
    If you can't get it looking any better and still want to change the color. You can seal the wood, (close up the grain to stop the stain from entering the wood fibers). Then put your choice of stain on top of the sealer, this will help you redo it if you don't like the way it comes out for you. if so remove the stain and try again. After you get it the way you like it cover the finish with the clear of choice (read the can of stain to find out what finish you can put over the stain).
    Good Luck!

  7. #6
    I have done several Mosin and SKS,A/K stocks, all old stuff, what I have found works best is, first do not sand, just get a good paint stripper, and corse steel wool, gloves and have at it when you get it stripped and it drys for a day or two, it will look like new wood, then you can smooth it a bit, and start staining, and sanding and staining, then clear if you want

  8. #7
    handgonnetoter Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketgeezer View Post
    I have done several Mosin and SKS,A/K stocks, all old stuff, what I have found works best is, first do not sand, just get a good paint stripper, and corse steel wool, gloves and have at it when you get it stripped and it drys for a day or two, it will look like new wood, then you can smooth it a bit, and start staining, and sanding and staining, then clear if you want
    I soaked my Mosin stocks in Laquer Thinner for a few hours, let dry for about five hours, then resoaked in fresh thinner for about another thirty minutes. I let that dry for about one day before I even started to sand, etc.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by unclewayne17 View Post
    1. It could just be the grain of the wood and the way it catches the light. 2. Could be the way the stain soaked in when you refinished it. If it is theis you will have to bleach out the stain if you can.
    If you can't get it looking any better and still want to change the color. You can seal the wood, (close up the grain to stop the stain from entering the wood fibers). Then put your choice of stain on top of the sealer, this will help you redo it if you don't like the way it comes out for you. if so remove the stain and try again. After you get it the way you like it cover the finish with the clear of choice (read the can of stain to find out what finish you can put over the stain).
    Good Luck!
    I think unclewayne may be correct with his #2 suggestion especially if it's walnut (can't tell from the pictures) as walnut is notorious for blotching when stain is applied to raw (or nearly) raw wood. You've got to seal it first with something to insure even absorption. Good luck!!

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by handgonnetoter View Post
    I soaked my Mosin stocks in Laquer Thinner for a few hours, let dry for about five hours, then resoaked in fresh thinner for about another thirty minutes. I let that dry for about one day before I even started to sand, etc.
    I guess that would work ok as long as you got all the old finish off, but I had the stripper on hand and a very little bit of laquer thinner

  11. #10
    handgonnetoter Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketgeezer View Post
    I guess that would work ok as long as you got all the old finish off, but I had the stripper on hand and a very little bit of laquer thinner
    I really was a little worried about soaking the stock in something as hot as Laquer Thinner, but all the years of oil in that wood just was tough to get out.

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