Regular scope on AR question
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Thread: Regular scope on AR question

  1. Regular scope on AR question

    Since I don't have the funding to afford good optics for my AR, I'm throwing on a cheap 3-9x32 that came with my Marlin 30-30 in the mean time. But I tried bore siting it at about 30-40 yards the other day and I can't seem to get the laser up high enough to the center of the reticle and its pretty much maxed out in the "up" direction. Do I need to find a way to cant the scope to a certain MOA? I would have though that wouldn't be necessary but maybe so. I'm just wanting to sight it in at 100 yards.

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  3. #2
    Not sure I understand what's really going on. You said you can't get the laser up high enough to the center recticle? The laser bore sighter doesn't move, it's stationary. If you can't see the laser in your scope, then your scope alignment is off or the laser bore sighter is not set in the barrel correctly. If you can see the laser in your scope, you move the recticel's to cross on the red dot.
    Kevin - NRA Life Member
    2nd Amendment = Freedom from Tyranny

  4. Quote Originally Posted by Purple View Post
    Not sure I understand what's really going on. You said you can't get the laser up high enough to the center recticle? The laser bore sighter doesn't move, it's stationary. If you can't see the laser in your scope, then your scope alignment is off or the laser bore sighter is not set in the barrel correctly. If you can see the laser in your scope, you move the recticel's to cross on the red dot.
    What I mean is, the laser was at the bottom of the reticle when I started, just barely inside the scope. I started turning the elevation adjustment in the "up" direction while looking through the scope and it creates the illusion as though the dot is moving up towards the center of the reticle, so that's why I referred to it in that way. But before the laser reached the center of the reticle, I topped out the elevation adjustment.

  5. #4

    Regular scope on AR question

    On an AR, there should be no need for a 20 MOA base. How much internal adjustment does your scope have? Sometimes those cheap ones don't have very much. With that said you should still have enough to zero. Make sure your scope is mounted properly, and with a level reticle. Make sure your bore sight is sitting correctly in the bore and fully inserted and make sure the laser is still shooting straight. Point the rifle at a wall and spin the bore sight in the bore. If it doesn't move it's good, if it moves in a circle it's out of alignment. You can also try lightly "banging" on the scope tube. I know it sounds crude but sometimes the adjustments in the scope become caught up and need to be broken loose. It's actually SOP now in the USMC when zeroing our ACOGs. Other than that I would suggest just skipping the short zero and jut bore sighting it at 100yds and see if that solves it. Best of luck.

  6. Regular scope on AR question

    Yeah I think I'm just not going to worry about it and wait till I can take it to the range. I did check the bore sight though and it does work properly.

  7. #6
    Join Date
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    If you can afford to spend about $70 try a trueglo red dot optic. I put one on my Sig M400 and it actually works very well and is really easy to zero. I first zeroed it at 50 yard and it is dead on at that range. The 55 grain .223/5.56mm actually rises about 3 inches at 100 yards. So once you run enough rounds through it you will find the proper hold over to be dead on at 100 yards. Truglo's red dot scope works pretty damn well for a low cost optic. It is the red dot with no magnification and is similar to an eotech typr reticle. Just suggestion..
    Bro.Mac
    US Army Veteran
    Desert Storm 90-91'

  8. Quote Originally Posted by AndeyHall View Post
    Yeah I think I'm just not going to worry about it and wait till I can take it to the range. I did check the bore sight though and it does work properly.
    Hello Andey, Is it possible that you are attempting to adjust your scope at less than 100 yards?.. if so this would be the problem.. at a short distance like 30 feet, the distance from your barrel to the center height of your scope will be magnified and impossible to align.... taking it to the range is the best plan or at least get the laser out to 50 yards..... otherwise you may strip the scope by over adjusting to compensate. Of course please disregard if this is not what you are doing and it is otherwise obvious.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JMoriarty View Post

    Hello Andey, Is it possible that you are attempting to adjust your scope at less than 100 yards?.. if so this would be the problem.. at a short distance like 30 feet, the distance from your barrel to the center height of your scope will be magnified and impossible to align.... taking it to the range is the best plan or at least get the laser out to 50 yards..... otherwise you may strip the scope by over adjusting to compensate. Of course please disregard if this is not what you are doing and it is otherwise obvious.
    This is not entirely correct. 30 feet? Yes that might cause an issue depending on the magnification and adjustment range of your optic.

    However, he said 30-40 YDS. Rough zeroing a rifle at this range is extremely common practice. It's called a near zero. If you know anything about external ballistics you know that a projectile crosses the optic's LOS twice due to its curved trajectory in relation to the optic's straight LOS. These two crossing points are called the near and far zero.

    When zeroing your rifle at 100 yds, firing a 55 grain .223 projectile at roughly 3240 fps will give you a near zero distance of 75yds (the first time it crosses the LOS.) Zeroing your rifle at 200 yds, firing the same projectile, will give you a near zero distance of 35 yds.

    This is extremely useful, when you don't have the range necessary to do a standard far zero (100/200yd) on your rifle. It's always advised to do a far zero when you get the chance because with the lesser range of a near zero, the margin of error is amplified and your zero will not be as accurate (why it's often called a rough zero.)

    Just thought is clear that up.

  10. Hello JCreek, thank you... and while adding that he was zeroing with a bore laser there will be only one zero.. All I was trying to say was his scope height will seem amplified and difficult to zero at too short of a distance. Meanwhile, I might venture that the scope, the angle of mount, or the laser itself is more likely the problem. Of course a little time at the range is always the cure, as it is for so many things... :)

  11. Regular scope on AR question

    Problem solved...since I made the deans list this past spring my parents volunteered to buy the scope I wanted. So I'm putting the Nikon M-223 2-8x32 BDC with their M-223 mount. Just put in the order to optics planet.

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