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Thread: Honor The Fallen

  1. #11
    Missed the Vietnam experience due to a high lottery number (1971) so I can't claim any military experience. But my Dad was a vet, and most of my uncles, some other relatives and many friends. I love 'em for it. This country is losing one of our most valuable resources very rapidly: those who served in the World Wars, faced economic depression at home, put their heads down and worked their butts off to support their families and their country. Yeah, they had their warts, who doesn't? But I realize now how much I'm gonna miss their insights, maturity, stablizing influence. They went through some hard times, sucked it up and forged ahead. Thanks, Dad.

    Years ago, I started to make a point to personally thank any military folks I run across (airports, around town, etc.). Frankly, the only people in our government I would even BEGIN to trust are those who are serving or have honorably served (unfortunately, this does exclude some: think Murtha from PA, Kerry from MA). These are truly the heroes in our country.

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  3. #12
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    I can tell you from personall experience that it puts a great amount of pride in your heart when a complete stranger finds out your military and shakes your hand and offers there gratitude out of the blue. I do not have any CLOSE relatives or friends that have fallen thank goodness. My grandfather served in Vietnam and my father in law is now retired army and I can only hope to match there service. I have almost 7 years in as an aircraft mechanic and can not even dream of having another job. I am in the military for multiple reasons with number one serving my country. As I sat here and read through this post I have to thank everyone for keeping the military in their heart it is truly appreciated and I highly encourge all to shake the hand of a vetern, active, reserve or gaurd member and let them know face to face how much you appreciate their service.

    My first memorable experience and when I relized how much the military is loved was at a random gas station in OK while traveling from NM to TN for vacation at home. The gentleman pumping gas next to me struck up a casual conversation and found out I was military (car tags) it might not have seemed like a big deal to him but I saw him go out of his way to walk around the pump and another car so he could stand "toe to toe" and shake my hand and thank me and once done he went back to his truck and told his friend (sitting in the passenger side of his truck) that I was military his friend got out came over to me and did the same (shake hands and thank me). I say this is my first memorable moment because it was at that point I felt like I had done something with my life.

    When ever I see someone with a WWII hat or other identifiable military memorbilia I give them the same respect and gratitude I felt that day. Again Thank you all for your apreciation of the military of the greatest country in the world and Thank you all for your service whether you are active retired or honorably dischard THANK YOU for your service.
    "The purpose of war is not to die for your country. The purpose of war is to ensure that the other guy dies for his country." - General Patton

  4. #13
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    Here in the South and specifically Charleston, SC, honor to the military is an everyday luxury that everyone of us who are not military rejoice in. I can recall the chills I got the last time I was at the airport when a group fo soldiers were returning from "whereever". As they disembarked and came into the lobby at the gates, all the people waiting for planes stood and applauded for each and everyone of them. God Bless America and God Bless our military. My son in law is fulltime Army Nationa Guard and my grandson (all 10 years of him) looks forward to following his father--I love them all and am proud of them. It is truly an honor to be able to applaud the sacrifice of our military.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by marionandjohn View Post
    I can tell you from personall experience that it puts a great amount of pride in your heart when a complete stranger finds out your military and shakes your hand and offers there gratitude out of the blue. I do not have any CLOSE relatives or friends that have fallen thank goodness. My grandfather served in Vietnam and my father in law is now retired army and I can only hope to match there service. I have almost 7 years in as an aircraft mechanic and can not even dream of having another job. I am in the military for multiple reasons with number one serving my country. As I sat here and read through this post I have to thank everyone for keeping the military in their heart it is truly appreciated and I highly encourge all to shake the hand of a vetern, active, reserve or gaurd member and let them know face to face how much you appreciate their service.

    My first memorable experience and when I relized how much the military is loved was at a random gas station in OK while traveling from NM to TN for vacation at home. The gentleman pumping gas next to me struck up a casual conversation and found out I was military (car tags) it might not have seemed like a big deal to him but I saw him go out of his way to walk around the pump and another car so he could stand "toe to toe" and shake my hand and thank me and once done he went back to his truck and told his friend (sitting in the passenger side of his truck) that I was military his friend got out came over to me and did the same (shake hands and thank me). I say this is my first memorable moment because it was at that point I felt like I had done something with my life.

    When ever I see someone with a WWII hat or other identifiable military memorbilia I give them the same respect and gratitude I felt that day. Again Thank you all for your apreciation of the military of the greatest country in the world and Thank you all for your service whether you are active retired or honorably dischard THANK YOU for your service.
    I wear my US Army Veteran hat most all the time. Last week a fellow I'd not met before asked me if that was MY hat. "Well, yeah!" I said. "It's on MY head." He looked at DH and thanked him for his service and then proceeded to ignore me. lol

    Weeks before that I was grocery shopping and a gal walked up to me and said, "Thank you for your service," gave me a hug, and then walked away. Sweet!

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    Here in the South and specifically Charleston, SC, honor to the military is an everyday luxury that everyone of us who are not military rejoice in. I can recall the chills I got the last time I was at the airport when a group fo soldiers were returning from "whereever". As they disembarked and came into the lobby at the gates, all the people waiting for planes stood and applauded for each and everyone of them. God Bless America and God Bless our military. My son in law is fulltime Army Nationa Guard and my grandson (all 10 years of him) looks forward to following his father--I love them all and am proud of them. It is truly an honor to be able to applaud the sacrifice of our military.
    Sweet! Quite a different scenario from when DH returned the final time from Viet Nam and he and his crew asked to be escorted out of the airport via a side door. Not that the public would have harmed them, they were all wearing green berets for goodness sake, but that they were angered BY the public to the point of harming the civilians. Ever been spit on while in uniform? He has. Sux! I'm so very glad the sentiment has changed 180 degrees!

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by HootmonSccy View Post
    I'll list my dad who died about 10 years ago..
    4 years in the army (pre-WWII)
    Went into the Navy During WWII as a Merchant Seaman on Liberty Ships
    When they created the Air Force, he switched over and became a E-8 Chief Master Sergeant responsible for maintenance of B-52's at SAC Bases.
    He retired after 24 years total service

    His Brother was in the Marines in WWII and was a purple heart recipient for a bad shrapnel wound between his left shoulder and his heart.. He was lucky to live.

    I spent 7 Years in the Coast Guard Reserve.

    So between the Three of us, we covered all of the services, but of course my service does not compare to theirs, but it helps round out the story...
    I spent 4.5 years in the Army Reserves. Please, don't discount your service because maybe you didn't serve in war time or weren't active duty or what ever. Thank those who served full time and especially those who were injured, and rightly so, but, we all had our jobs, and imho, one is no less comparable to another. We, you and I, were willing to go when called. That's a lot in itself. I thank you, Hoot, and yours for what you ALL did.

  8. #17
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    Hey gdcleanfun: You talk about the situation being different during Vietnam years. Here in SC, the situation has always been the same--respect and honor of our military. I truly believe that there is a sense of honor, service, trust, family, land, and respect for the military and for each other here in the South that does not exist in all the other parts of the country---particularly the northeast, where I was born and raised. Handshakes, saluting the flag, yes sir--no sir civility, respect for elders, respect for the military and LE still mean something.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    Hey gdcleanfun: You talk about the situation being different during Vietnam years. Here in SC, the situation has always been the same--respect and honor of our military. I truly believe that there is a sense of honor, service, trust, family, land, and respect for the military and for each other here in the South that does not exist in all the other parts of the country---particularly the northeast, where I was born and raised. Handshakes, saluting the flag, yes sir--no sir civility, respect for elders, respect for the military and LE still mean something.
    Kelcarry, nice to hear. This was when DH landed on the east coast, coming home. He said the same things happened in California. Sux!

  10. #19
    GD, It was a strange time back then. When I left Da Nang I dropped into El Toro in prca. If you had a deep tan, short hair and strange shinney shoes, you were treated with, shall we say, disdain. I kid you not, I bought a wig in LA to travel in to go home. It wasn't that I was upset of mot proud of being a Marine, I just did not want the trouble.
    Semper Fi

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricbak View Post
    GD, It was a strange time back then. When I left Da Nang I dropped into El Toro in prca. If you had a deep tan, short hair and strange shinney shoes, you were treated with, shall we say, disdain. I kid you not, I bought a wig in LA to travel in to go home. It wasn't that I was upset of mot proud of being a Marine, I just did not want the trouble.
    Ricbak, you are so right; strange indeed!

    Sometimes I would wear my Class As, complete with name, rank, and cover, as my costume for Halloween int he late 70s to the early 80s. People would think I was joking and ask me what Army I belonged to. When I'd answer, "Ours," they would proceed to bash the military. Sucked! But it was my calling to explain how they were mistaken. I still have to explain it to people who don't believe I'm a vet. I am glad you are proud of being a Marine. I'm proud of you, too! And, thanks for your service!

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