A little history lesson! Gadsen Flag!!!
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Thread: A little history lesson! Gadsen Flag!!!

  1. #1
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    Exclamation A little history lesson! Gadsen Flag!!!



    Gadsden flag
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    The Gadsden Flag
    Gadsden flag - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag with a yellow field depicting a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Positioned below the snake is the legend "DONT TREAD ON ME". The flag was designed by and is named after American general and statesman Christopher Gadsden. It was also used by the United States Marine Corps as an early motto flag.

    The use of the timber rattlesnake as a symbol of the American colonies can be traced back to the publications of Benjamin Franklin. In 1751, he made the first reference to the rattlesnake in a satirical commentary published in his Pennsylvania Gazette. It had been the policy of Britain to send convicted criminals to America, so Franklin suggested that they thank the British by sending rattlesnakes to England.
    Benjamin Franklin's "Join, or Die" cartoon

    In 1754, during the French and Indian War, Franklin published his famous woodcut of a snake cut into eight sections. It represented the colonies, with New England joined together as the head and South Carolina as the tail, following their order along the coast. Under the snake was the message "Join, or Die". This was the first political cartoon published in an American newspaper.

    As the American Revolution grew, the snake began to see more use as a symbol of the colonies. In 1774, Paul Revere added it to the title of his paper, the Massachusetts Spy, as a snake joined to fight a British dragon.[1] In December 1775, Benjamin Franklin published an essay in the Pennsylvania Journal under the pseudonym American Guesser in which he suggested that the rattlesnake was a good symbol for the American spirit:

    "I recollected that her eye excelled in brightness, that of any other animal, and that she has no eye-lids—She may therefore be esteemed an emblem of vigilance.—She never begins an attack, nor, when once engaged, ever surrenders: She is therefore an emblem of magnanimity and true courage.—As if anxious to prevent all pretensions of quarreling with her, the weapons with which nature has furnished her, she conceals in the roof of her mouth, so that, to those who are unacquainted with her, she appears to be a most defenseless animal; and even when those weapons are shewn and extended for her defense, they appear weak and contemptible; but their wounds however small, are decisive and fatal:—Conscious of this, she never wounds till she has generously given notice, even to her enemy, and cautioned him against the danger of treading on her.—Was I wrong, Sir, in thinking this a strong picture of the temper and conduct of America?"[2]

    Gadsden's flag in an 1885 school book

    In fall 1775, the United States Navy was established to intercept incoming British ships carrying war supplies to the British troops in the colonies. To aid in this, the Second Continental Congress authorized the mustering of five companies of Marines to accompany the Navy on their first mission. The first Marines that enlisted were from Philadelphia and they carried drums painted yellow, depicting a coiled rattlesnake with thirteen rattles, and the motto "Don't Tread On Me." This is the first recorded mention of the future Gadsden flag's symbolism.

    At the Congress, Continental Colonel Christopher Gadsden represented his home state of South Carolina. He was one of three members of the Marine Committee who were outfitting the first naval mission. It is unclear whether Gadsden took his inspiration from the Marines' drums, or if he inspired them himself.

    Before the departure of that first mission, the newly appointed commander-in-chief of the Navy, Commodore Esek Hopkins, received the yellow rattlesnake flag described above from Gadsden to serve as his distinctive personal standard.

    Gadsden also presented a copy of this flag to the South Carolina legislature in Charleston, South Carolina. This was recorded in the South Carolina congressional journals:

    Col. Gadsden presented to the Congress an elegant standard, such as is to be used by the commander in chief of the American navy; being a yellow field, with a lively representation of a rattle-snake in the middle, in the attitude of going to strike, and these words underneath, "Don't Tread on Me!"

    [edit] Contemporary significance

    Considered one of the first flags of the United States, the flag was later replaced by the current Stars and Stripes (or Old Glory) flag. Since the Revolution, the flag has seen times of reintroduction as a symbol of American patriotism, a symbol of disagreement with government, or a symbol of support for civil liberties.
    First U.S. Navy Jack
    Flag of the Free State Project

    For instance, unofficial usage of the Gadsden flag by the U.S. government has been seen, particularly in the wake of September 11, 2001, most notably by the Customs Service and harbor patrol boats in U.S. ports and individuals serving abroad in the U.S. military.[citation needed] The First Navy Jack, which was directly related to the Gadsden flag, has also been in use by the U.S. Navy, and since the terrorist attacks it is flown on all active naval ships.[citation needed] The rattlesnake from the flag is shown on the U.S. Army's Drill Sergeant Identification Badge.

    Athletic apparel company Nike uses the image of a snake coiled around a soccer ball for an ongoing, patriotic "Don't Tread On Me" campaign in support of the United States men's national soccer team. The phrase has become a rallying cry for American soccer fans and the Gadsden flag can occasionally be seen at national team games. A representation of the rattlesnake is contained on the inside of their uniforms to be used in in the 2010 World Cup.[3] Coincidentally, USA opened the World Cup play against England. In 2006, the campaign was accompanied by a hip-hop song performed by team member Clint Dempsey entitled "Don't Tread". The Philadelphia Union Major League Soccer expansion team, set to play in 2010, incorporated the coiled snake into its logo that was unveiled in May, 2009. The only differences between the team's logo and the snake on the Gadsen flag is that the snake on the team's logo lacks the rattle on its tail, and that it is displayed on a blue and gold background in the likeness of the municipal flag of the city of Philadelphia.

    A Gadsden flag was presented to the town manager of Killington, Vermont, by a representative of the Free State Project after that town's 2004 vote to pursue secession from Vermont. The Free State Project adopted a unique version of the Gadsden Flag which bears the organization's mascot, a porcupine, rather than a snake.

    On June 17, 2010 a dozen Gadsden Flags were presented to each elected board member at a public hearing of the Town of Grafton, New York by a citizen in opposition to the board's decision to replace the elected Assessors with a Sole Appointed Assessor without an opportunity for a public referendum vote on the issue. The action of the citizen represents the idea that "Taxation Without Elected Representation" is the right of the electors, not the elected.[4]

    The Boy Scouts of America frequently fly this flag at campouts, ceremonies, and jamborees.[citation needed]

    The flag appears in the Disney animated television series Recess, raised above the home of the character Gustav, whose father is a Marine. It is seen in the first episode's segment titled, "The New Kid," which addresses individuality and tyranny.

    For historical reasons, the flag is still popularly flown in Charleston, South Carolina, being the city where Christopher Gadsden first presented the flag, and where it was commonly used during the revolution, along with the blue and white crescent flag of pre-Civil War South Carolina. It also appears in a historical context in the 2000 film The Patriot in Charleston and in battle alongside the Old Glory flag. Metallica later used the flag on their self-dubbed "Black Album" as a song name ("Don't Tread on Me"), and on the cover of the album, the snake from the flag is in the lower right hand corner. 311's eighth studio album is titled "don't tread on me" released 2005, and also of significance is the Cro-Mags' track of the same title. The New Jersey based punk rock group Titus Andronicus features one on the cover of their self-titled album, and the flag is frequently seen with them on tour. The flag has also been used as a critical prop in several movies and TV shows, such as in the final episode of Jericho, where it was flown to signal the titular town's independence. The flag also hung on the wall of Sam Seaborn's office in the television series "The West Wing". Inspecting Sam's flag carefully, you will notice the prop was constructed in error. The bottom stripe is white instead of red.

    Beginning in 2009, the flag became a popular display by protesters who are members of the Tea Party movement. It was also seen being displayed by members of congress on March 20 and 21, 2010 at Tea Party rallies.[5]
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  2.   
  3. #2
    Semper FI

  4. #3
    Very nice
    -Austin

  5. #4
    Very Good Festus.. Thank You...
    My Gadsden Flag is here on the desk but my Red Globe, Eagle and Anchor is getting a little faded and I should get a new one.

    I have to add (Anad Maybe a little off Topic)....

    Once he has earned the title and entered the Brotherhood of Marines, a new warrior must draw upon the legacy of his Corps. Therein lies his strength. In return, the strength of the Corps lies in the individual Marine. The character (often defined as "what you are in the dark") of these warriors is defined by the three constant Corps Values: honor, courage, and commitment.

    Honor: Honor requires each Marine to exemplify the ultimate standard in ethical and moral conduct. Honor is many things; honor requires many things. A U.S. Marine must never lie, never cheat, never steal, but that is not enough. Much more is required. Each Marine must cling to an uncompromising code of personal integrity, accountable for his actions and holding others accountable for theirs. And, above all, honor mandates that a Marine never sully the reputation of his Corps.
    Courage: Simply stated, courage is honor in action -- and more. Courage is moral strength, the will to heed the inner voice of conscience, the will to do what is right regardless of the conduct of others. It is mental discipline, an adherence to a higher standard. Courage means willingness to take a stand for what is right in spite of adverse consequences. This courage, throughout the history of the Corps, has sustained Marines during the chaos, perils, and hardships of combat. And each day, it enables each Marine to look in the mirror -- and smile.

    Commitment: Total dedication to Corps and Country. Gung-ho Marine teamwork. All for one, one for all. By whatever name or cliche, commitment is a combination of (1) selfless determination and (2) a relentless dedication to excellence. Marines never give up, never give in, never willingly accept second best. Excellence is always the goal. And, when their active duty days are over, Marines remain reserve Marines, retired Marines, or Marine veterans. There is no such thing as an ex-Marine or former-Marine. Once a Marine, always a Marine. Commitment never dies.

    The three Corps Values: honor, courage, commitment. They make up the bedrock of the character of each individual Marine. They are the foundation of his Corps. These three values, handed down from generation to generation, have made U.S. Marines the Warrior Elite. The U.S. Marine Corps: the most respected and revered fighting force on earth.

    Corps Values
    Semper Fi

  6. #5
    Semper Fi


    Colonial Lexington

    The town of Lexington was first settled by colonists in 1642. Originally it was named Cambridge Farms because it was considered part of Cambridge. The name Lexington was not given to the area until 1713. Anyone who resided in Lexington was a farmer and soldier- this becomes important a few years later. As a farming community in its early days, Lexington supplied Boston with the majority of its produce. In addition, the town built many mills along the Vine Brook that runs through the center of town. Muzzey Mill is considered to be the first mill built along the river alothough the exact date is unknown. The location today is at 1666 Massachusetts Avenue. The river was used as power to grind the wheat and corn into flour that would be sold at market.
    In April of 1775, the British officials stationed in Boston recieved word that the colonists were beginning to gather and store guns, cannons, and ammunition in Concord. On April 14th, English General Thomas Gage was given the order to take the weapons away from the rebel colonists and to imprison Samuel Adams and John Hancock. The British troops began their march from Boston Common late in the evening of April 18th, 1775. The British soldiers were forced to stop their journey many times to wait for back up and supplies but eventually they made it to Lexington sometime around sunrise the next day. The seventeen mile march took about three hours to complete but the British were very unorganized. In Lexington, the British soldiers came face to face with the colonial militiamen, under the leadership of John Parker. The militiamen had stayed in Buckman Tavern because they had received word that the British were on their way. It is said that Parker told his men not to shoot unless the British shot first and when the two armies met, both Gage and Parker told the armies to disperse and not fight, yet things got out of hand in the huge gathering of people and eventually a shot was taken. It will never be known who fired the shot that began the Revolutionary War, some say it was a British soldier, others a Continental soldier, and some say the shot came from a house by the common. Eight Lexington soldiers and one British soldier were killed. After the fighting had stopped, the British continued on their way to Concord where they would be defeated by the colonists and forced to turn back to Boston.


    http://burnpit.legion.org/2009/10/to...gton-of-texas/

    October 2, 1835, Mexican tyrant
    Santa Anna tries to disarm Texans
    at Gonzales, whose response is to
    fly this flag, Texas' first battle flag.


    1990's, American and international
    tyrants try to disarm citizens, who
    again fly ole' Come and Take It.


    .50 BMGs are top priority for gun control advocates, and should be at the top of our list to defend. Variously, efforts are underway to ban, register, or re-classify these fine weapons as Class III (machineguns). Our response to these efforts is a resounding NO!


    http://comeandtakeit.com/

    "The people never give up their liberties, but under some delusion." - Edmund Burke

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    Quote Originally Posted by ricbak View Post
    Very Good Festus.. Thank You...
    My Gadsden Flag is here on the desk but my Red Globe, Eagle and Anchor is getting a little faded and I should get a new one.

    I have to add (Anad Maybe a little off Topic)....






    Corps Values
    That is why my oldest is in Boot camp at Parris Island right now. He is gonna make a good Marine!
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    That is why my oldest is in Boot camp at Parris Island right now. He is gonna make a good Marine!
    I remember, Just let us know how is doing from time to time. He has been there what 3 months and another one to go?
    Semper Fi

  9. #8
    thanks for more history. I really like that flag. I have a t-shirt of it and bumper stickers. still on the list is an actual flag:)
    You can have my freedom as soon as I'm done with it!!!

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Bohemian View Post
    Colonial Lexington

    The town of Lexington was first settled by colonists in 1642. Originally it was named Cambridge Farms because it was considered part of Cambridge. The name Lexington was not given to the area until 1713. Anyone who resided in Lexington was a farmer and soldier- this becomes important a few years later. As a farming community in its early days, Lexington supplied Boston with the majority of its produce. In addition, the town built many mills along the Vine Brook that runs through the center of town. Muzzey Mill is considered to be the first mill built along the river alothough the exact date is unknown. The location today is at 1666 Massachusetts Avenue. The river was used as power to grind the wheat and corn into flour that would be sold at market.
    In April of 1775, the British officials stationed in Boston recieved word that the colonists were beginning to gather and store guns, cannons, and ammunition in Concord. On April 14th, English General Thomas Gage was given the order to take the weapons away from the rebel colonists and to imprison Samuel Adams and John Hancock. The British troops began their march from Boston Common late in the evening of April 18th, 1775. The British soldiers were forced to stop their journey many times to wait for back up and supplies but eventually they made it to Lexington sometime around sunrise the next day. The seventeen mile march took about three hours to complete but the British were very unorganized. In Lexington, the British soldiers came face to face with the colonial militiamen, under the leadership of John Parker. The militiamen had stayed in Buckman Tavern because they had received word that the British were on their way. It is said that Parker told his men not to shoot unless the British shot first and when the two armies met, both Gage and Parker told the armies to disperse and not fight, yet things got out of hand in the huge gathering of people and eventually a shot was taken. It will never be known who fired the shot that began the Revolutionary War, some say it was a British soldier, others a Continental soldier, and some say the shot came from a house by the common. Eight Lexington soldiers and one British soldier were killed. After the fighting had stopped, the British continued on their way to Concord where they would be defeated by the colonists and forced to turn back to Boston.
    I see why the British were defeated, they marched 17 miles in three hours. They were too tired to fight.
    This is a good story but does get confusing trying to follow it which is they way history is usually written, a little exagerated according to who writes it.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by FN1910 View Post
    I see why the British were defeated, they marched 17 miles in three hours. They were too tired to fight.
    This is a good story but does get confusing trying to follow it which is they way history is usually written, a little exagerated according to who writes it.
    Not quite sure what part you think is exaggerated ?

    5.7 miles an hour or a roughly a 11 minute mile = a 17 mile forced march, which is not a remarkable feat then or now...

    Ask any Marine whom has done the common 14 mile forced marches down the beach at Camp Pendleton in boots and full gear (75 pounds plus in the Alice Pack Days)...

    A slow marathon runner is somebody whom cannot run the 26 mile gauntlet in less then 3 hours... 8.7 miles an hour or roughly a 7 minute mile...

    Be that as it may... the main point being that historically when our means to effectively oppose a tyrannical government where threatened to be banned/confiscated etc., (Cannons, etc., in the Case of Lexington & Concord and the Alamo) we did not bend over and take it and say thank you sir, may I have another?

    "The people never give up their liberties, but under some delusion." - Edmund Burke

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