I Have Only TWO Questions for You - Page 2
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Thread: I Have Only TWO Questions for You

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Congrats! That is quite cool!

  2.   
  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLT View Post
    Well, I am going to have to change my screen name. I will only be a Lieutenant in the Navy for 5 more days. On June 1 I become a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy. So I should become NavyLCDR.

    Also "hooray" in the Navy is Bravo Zulu, or BZ:

    http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq101-2.htm

    "Bravo Zulu"

    This is a naval signal, conveyed by flaghoist or voice radio, meaning "well done"; it has also passed into the spoken and written vocabulary. It can be combined with the "negative" signal, spoken or written NEGAT, to say "NEGAT Bravo Zulu," or "not well done."

    There are some "myths and legends" attached to this signal. The one most frequently heard has Admiral Halsey sending it to ships of Task Force 38 during World War II. He could not have done this, since the signal did not exist at that time.

    "Bravo Zulu" actually comes from the Allied Naval Signal Book (ACP 175 series), an international naval signal code adopted after the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was created in 1949. Until then, each navy had used its own signal code and operational manuals. World War II experience had shown that it was difficult, or even impossible, for ships of different navies to operate together unless they could readily communicate, and ACP 175 was designed to remedy this.

    In the U.S. Navy signal code, used before ACP 175, "well done" was signaled as TVG, or "Tare Victor George" in the U.S. phonetic alphabet of that time. ACP 175 was organized in the general manner of other signal books, that is, starting with 1-flag signals, then 2-flag and so on. The 2-flag signals were organized by general subject, starting with AA, AB, AC, ... AZ, BA, BB, BC, ... BZ, and so on. The B- signals were called "Administrative" signals, and dealt with miscellaneous matters of administration and housekeeping. The last signal on the "Administrative" page was BZ, standing for "well done."

    At that time BZ was not rendered as "Bravo Zulu," but in each navy's particular phonetic alphabet. In the U.S. Navy, BZ was spoken as "Baker Zebra." In the meanwhile, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) had adopted English as the international air traffic control language. They developed a phonetic alphabet for international aviation use, designed to be as "pronounceable" as possible by flyers and traffic controllers speaking many different languages. This was the "Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta..." alphabet used today. The Navy adopted this ICAO alphabet in March 1956. It was then that "Baker Zebra" finally became "Bravo Zulu."
    Sweet! I love how much I can learn here. And congratulations. That is something to be proud of, for sure.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by titaniumman View Post
    I have had several spine surgeries, My lumbar spine is held together with cobalt steel artificial discs at 2 levels and lots of titanium screws. so it was either cobaltman or titaniumman. You know the rest of the story!!
    No kiddin'?! See? I never would have guessed that.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babarock View Post
    My screen name is easy - in 1998 I traveled to Mainland China and adopted a beautiful little girl who is my greatest pride and joy. Father in Chinese is Baba. I will always be her rock to hold on to, thus Babarock.
    I love it.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by B2Tall View Post
    My forum name (B2Tall) obviously refers to my love of peach ice cream.
    *Snort!*

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by aj's 40 cal View Post
    mine is my initals plus the gun i carry = aj's.40cal, may I ask why is your's localgirl... obvious from the fact ur a girl.. lol
    K, I get that! I have only ever posted on one other forum, which is my local newspaper. I was commenting about the bypass they are planning to build, and decided on localgirl because yes, I am female (though I am twenty years past being a girl), and obviously I am local to Sandpoint (VERY important around here--the only thing that gives you any cred!), so I just kept that handle.

  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc Mustang View Post
    I am a former enlisted submariner, when I finished my first term I left the navy, and went to college with the assistance of the Army National guard where I served as a medic. Then I was accepted to medical school and accepted a Navy commission as a doctor. In the Naval service former enlisteds who become officers are referred to as "Mustangs". Doc being a title for both physicians and medics comes first hence: Doc Mustang.

    In the submarine community we use both "BZ" as well as something which was carried over from the navy diver community "Hoo-ya" (obviously descended from the Marines OO-rah!) which is not to be confused with the army's ubiquitous "Houah!" which serves as everything from "do you understand me?" to "screw you", as well as a cheer.
    Never would have known that. And NOW I have a large arsenal of shout-outs to choose from. Sweet.

  9. #18
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    WV, 3rd bridge south, second girder in, deep amidst the shadows
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    Localgirl,
    Mine is the callsign used by the team in Vietnam. As for your being past the age of a girl, I doubt we old boys will agree with that comment.

    .38 Super, .45 1911 frames depending on location.

    take care and be safe
    pfb
    " A congressman with a vote is more dangerous than a redneck with a brand new and loaded gun."

  10. #19
    50AE is a caliber designation. AE stands for action express: two pistol cartridges use this designation. The .41AE was the first atempt to create a 10mm/40caliber autopistol cartridge. The design uses a rebated rim, meaning that the rim is smaller than the case wall diameter, and in the case of the 41AE the rim is the same size as a 9mm luger. The reason for using this odd design is so that a pistol could be developed off of existing nine mm platforms without changing the extractor mechanism.

    The 50AE also uses a rebated rim in this case being to same size as the 44mag rim. This was done to make cartridge compatable with the Israelil Desert Eagle pistol. Acardia Machine and Tool also made a pistol, the AutoMag V, for this cartridge. L.A.R. made an oversized 1911 named the Grizzley which could be had in 50AE and IMHO would probably be the only 1911 design worth owning. Single action revolver fans are not to be left out, Freedom Arms made a model 555 holding five rounds of 50AE.

    As an interesting twist Corbon Ammo and Magnum Research (Importers of the Desert Eagle) colaborated to make the .440 Corbon, a unique cartridge that is both bottle necked and uses a rebated rim. The .440 Corbon is a 50AE necked down to take a .44 bullet.

  11. I think my screen name is pretty obvious :-)

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