Soilder fights off 30 taliban ALONE!
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Thread: Soilder fights off 30 taliban ALONE!

  1. #1

    Exclamation Soilder fights off 30 taliban ALONE!

    LONDON (AFP) – A Nepalese soldier in the British army has been given a top bravery award by Queen Elizabeth II for his heroics in Afghanistan, where he single-handedly saw off more than 30 Taliban fighters.

    Corporal Dipprasad Pun, 31, said he thought he was going to die and so had nothing to lose in taking on the attackers who overran his checkpoint.

    He was awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross (CGC), which is given in recognition of acts of conspicuous gallantry during active operations against the enemy.

    Pun fired more than 400 rounds, launched 17 grenades and detonated a mine to repel the Taliban assault on his checkpoint near Babaji in Helmand Province, southern Afghanistan, last September.

    Surrounded, the enemy opened fired from all sides and for 15 minutes Pun remained under continuous attack, including from rocket-propelled grenades and AK47 guns.

    At one point, unable to shoot, he used his machine gun tripod to knock down a militant who was climbing the walls of the compound.

    Two insurgents were still attacking by the time he ran out of ammunition, but he set off a Claymore mine to repel them.

    Pun was given his medal in a ceremony at Buckingham Palace in London on Wednesday.

    The CGC is second only to the Victoria Cross -- the highest honour for bravery in the face of the enemy.

    "There wasn't any choice but to fight. The Taliban were all around the checkpoint. I was alone," he said.

    "I had so many of them around me that I thought I was definitely going to die so I thought I'd kill as many of them as I could before they killed me.

    "After that I thought nobody can kill us now -- when we met the enemy I wasn't scared."

    Britain's Major General Nicholas Carter, who was commander of allied forces in southern Afghanistan during Pun's deployment, praised his efforts.

    "The CGC does not get handed out lightly. It was a most remarkable achievement," he said.

    Kinda funny how in the face is certain death all fear is gone and we are at peace knowing we may die.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    South of Chicago
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    bravo sir... bravo... Glad he came out alive.
    "Loyalty to the country always. Loyalty to the government when it deserves it."
    "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." (Winston Churchill).

  4. SECOND highest?!

    Congrats and bravo to the man but I have one question. Is it required that you DIE to get the Victoria Cross? 30 people alone is enough in my book.

  5. #4
    I'm assuming he was a Gurkha. Those guys are certified, no-sh#t [email protected] My only question is what the heck do you have to do to receive the Victorian Cross?

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    I'm assuming he was a Gurkha. Those guys are certified, no-sh#t [email protected] My only question is what the heck do you have to do to receive the Victorian Cross?
    Award process
    The obverse of the bronze cross pattée medal; showing the crown of Saint Edward surmounted by a lion with the inscription FOR VALOUR with a blue ribbon
    The obverse of William Johnstone's VC showing the dark blue ribbon for pre-1918 awards to naval personnel.

    The Victoria Cross is awarded for

    ... most conspicuous bravery, or some daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice, or extreme devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.[1]

    A recommendation for the VC is normally issued by an officer at regimental level, or equivalent, and has to be supported by three witnesses, although this has been waived on occasion.[26] The recommendation is then passed up the military hierarchy until it reaches the Secretary of State for Defence. The recommendation is then laid before the monarch who approves the award with his or her signature. Victoria Cross awards are always promulgated in the London Gazette with the single exception of the award to the American Unknown Soldier in 1921.[27] The Victoria Cross warrant makes no specific provision as to who should actually present the medals to the recipients. Queen Victoria indicated that she would like to present the medals in person and she presented 185 medals out of the 472 gazetted during her reign. Including the first 62 medals presented at a parade in Hyde Park on 26 June 1857 by Queen Victoria, nearly 900 awards have been personally presented to the recipient by the reigning British monarch. Nearly 300 awards have been presented by a member of the royal family or by a civil or military dignitary. About 150 awards were either forwarded to the recipient or next of kin by registered post or no details of the presentations are known.[28]

    The original Royal Warrant did not contain a specific clause regarding posthumous awards, although official policy was to not award the VC posthumously. Between the Indian Mutiny in 1857 and the beginning of the Second Boer War the names of six officers and men were published in the London Gazette with a memorandum stating they would have been awarded the Victoria Cross had they survived. A further three notices were published in the London Gazette in September 1900 and April 1901 for gallantry in the Second Boer War. In a partial reversal of policy, six posthumous Victoria Crosses, all for South Africa including the three officers and men mentioned in the notices in 1900 and 1901 were granted on 8 August 1902. Five years later in 1907, the posthumous policy was completely reversed and medals were sent to the next of kin of the six officers and men.[29] The awards were mentioned in notices in the Gazette dating back to the Indian Mutiny. The Victoria Cross warrant was not amended to explicitly allow posthumous awards until 1920, but one quarter of all awards for World War I were posthumous.[30][31] Although the 1920 Royal Warrant made provision for awards to women serving in the Armed Forces, no women have been awarded a VC.

    In the case of a gallant and daring act being performed by a squadron, ship's company or a detached body of men (such as marines) in which all men are deemed equally brave and deserving of the Victoria Cross then a ballot is drawn. The officers select one officer, the NCOs select one individual and the private soldiers or seamen select two individuals.[32] In all 46 awards have been awarded by ballot with 29 of the awards during the Indian Mutiny. Four further awards were granted to Q Battery, Royal Horse Artillery at Korn Spruit on 31 March 1900 during the Second Boer War. The final ballot awards for the Army were the six awards to the Lancashire Fusiliers at W Beach during the landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915 although three of the awards were not gazetted until 1917. The final seven ballot awards were the only naval ballot awards with three awards to two Q-Ships in 1917 and four awards for the Zeebrugge Raid in 1918. The provision for awards by ballot is still included in the Victoria Cross warrant but there have been no further such awards since 1918.[26]

    Between 1858 and 1881 the Victoria Cross could be awarded for actions taken "under circumstances of extreme danger" not in the face of the enemy.[33] Six such awards were made during this period—five of them for a single incident during an Expedition to the Andaman Islands in 1867.[34] In 1881, the criteria were changed again and the VC was only awarded for acts of valour "in the face of the enemy".[34] Due to this it has been suggested by many historians including Lord Ashcroft that the changing nature of warfare will result in fewer VCs being awarded.[35] The prevalence of remote fighting techniques has meant that opportunities to carry out acts of bravery in the face of the enemy are diminishing. Since 1940, military personnel who have distinguished themselves for gallantry not in the face of the enemy have been awarded the George Cross, which ranks immediately after the VC in the Order of Wear.
    A total of 1,356 Victoria Crosses have been awarded since 1856,On 18 March 2005, Lance Corporal (then Private) Johnson Beharry of the 1st Battalion, Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment became the first recipient of the VC since Sergeant Ian McKay in 1982.

    Only two have been given out in the 21st century, one for actions in Iraq and the other for actions in Afghanistan.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    I'm assuming he was a Gurkha. Those guys are certified, no-sh#t [email protected] My only question is what the heck do you have to do to receive the Victorian Cross?
    Yes he is a member of the The Royal Gurkha Rifles, it says he is now a Acting Sergeant.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    I'm assuming he was a Gurkha. Those guys are certified, no-sh#t [email protected] My only question is what the heck do you have to do to receive the Victorian Cross?
    It seems this is the kind of thing once must do to receive the cross,

    During the night of 11th/12th June 1982, 3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment mounted a silent night attack on an enemy battalion position on Mount Longdon, an important objective in the battle for Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands. Sergeant McKay was platoon sergeant of 4 Platoon, B Company, which, after the initial objective had been secured, was ordered to clear the Northern side of the long East/West ridge feature, held by the enemy in depth, with strong, mutually-supporting positions. By now the enemy were fully alert, and resisting fiercely. As 4 Platoon's advance continued it came under increasingly heavy fire from a number of well-sited enemy machine gun positions on the ridge, and received casualties. Realising that no further advance was possible the Platoon Commander ordered the Platoon to move from its exposed position to seek shelter among the rocks of the ridge itself. Here it met up with part of 5 Platoon.

    The enemy fire was still both heavy and accurate, and the position of the platoons was becoming increasingly hazardous. Taking Sergeant McKay, a Corporal and a few others, and covered by supporting machine gun fire, the Platoon Commander moved forward to reconnoitre the enemy positions but was hit by a bullet in the leg, and command devolved upon Sergeant McKay.

    It was clear that instant action was needed if the advance was not to falter and increasing casualties to ensue. Sergeant McKay decided to convert this reconnaissance into an attack in order to eliminate the enemy positions. He was in no doubt of the strength and deployment of the enemy as he undertook this attack. He issued orders, and taking three men with him, broke cover and charged the enemy position.

    The assault was met by a hail of fire. The Corporal was seriously wounded, a Private killed and another wounded. Despite these losses Sergeant McKay, with complete disregard for his own safety, continued to charge the enemy position alone. On reaching it he despatched the enemy with grenades, thereby relieving the position of beleaguered 4 and 5 Platoons, who were now able to redeploy with relative safety. Sergeant McKay, however, was killed at the moment of victory, his body falling on the bunker.

    Without doubt Sergeant McKay's action retrieved a most dangerous situation and was instrumental in ensuring the success of the attack. His was a coolly calculated act, the dangers of which must have been all too apparent to him beforehand. Undeterred he performed with outstanding selflessness, perseverance and courage.

    With a complete disregard for his own safety, he displayed courage and leadership of the highest order, and was an inspiration to all those around him.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  9. #8
    Join Date
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    Reading this man's account is very humbling indeed.
    1)"When injustice becomes law, resistance becomes duty." -Thomas Jefferson.
    2)"Imagine how gun control might be stomped if GOA or SAF had the (compromising) NRA's 4 million members!" -Me. http://jpfo.org/filegen-n-z/nraletter.htm

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by S&WM&P40 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    I'm assuming he was a Gurkha. Those guys are certified, no-sh#t [email protected] My only question is what the heck do you have to do to receive the Victorian Cross?
    Yes he is a member of the The Royal Gurkha Rifles, it says he is now a Acting Sergeant.
    Someone won't be a sergeant for long

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by scottbland247 View Post
    Someone won't be a sergeant for long
    Why?

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

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