More Mexicans leaving U.S. under duress
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Thread: More Mexicans leaving U.S. under duress

  1. #1

    More Mexicans leaving U.S. under duress

    I thought this was so cool,I wanted to share it with all of my friends here.Now,realize,I DO NOT have anything against any ethnic group or nationality,be it Mexican,Russian,Chinese...or Canadian.But I DO have something against ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS from ANY country.
    So this came as good news to me.


    More Mexicans leaving U.S. under duress | TOP STORIES | KHOU.com | News for Houston, Texas

    More Mexicans leaving U.S. under duress

    10:49 AM CDT on Saturday, July 5, 2008

    By OCTAVIO RIVERA LOPEZ / Al Dia

    DALLAS -- Two hours were enough for José Luis Sánchez and his family to pack their most valuable belongings in two vans – items accumulated in 10 years of living in the Dallas area.

    With his wife, children and their suitcases in place, Mr. Sánchez closed the door of his Mesquite apartment for the last time, sat at the wheel of one of the vehicles – his brother drove the other – and hit the road back to his homeland.

    So ended his decade-long adventure as an illegal Mexican immigrant in the United States.

    According to Mexican consulate officials in Dallas, some 400 immigrant families have told them so far this year that they're going back to Mexico and asked for transfer documents to enroll their children in Mexican schools.

    Enrique Hubbard Urrea, Mexican consul general in Dallas, said it is impossible to track every Mexican who leaves the area. But he said the number asking for transfer documents at the consulate is on the rise.

    In 2005, the consulate issued 162 such documents; in 2006 it was 199; and last year it was 270. At the current rate, more than twice as many people will leave this year as last, he said.

    "There is no doubt the trend indicates that the number is growing," Mr. Hubbard said.

    And it isn't happening only in Dallas. At the Mexican consulates in Chicago and Phoenix, too, the number of Mexican families applying for transfer documents for their children has increased.

    So far in 2008, more people (752) have visited the Mexican consulate in Phoenix to apply for transfer documents than the total for 2006 (248) and 2007 (330) combined, according to officials there.

    According to informal surveys by the Mexican consulate in Dallas, most of those wanting to return to Mexico cite the sudden scarcity of jobs, fear of deportation and uncertainty about obtaining legal resident status any time soon.

    In the last few years, and particularly the last few months, Mr. Sánchez struggled to find work. His earnings dwindled as his children grew up and their needs multiplied.

    "People like me, if you don't work one day, you worry about how to feed your family the next day," he said. "We as immigrant workers never have stability, even if the economy is doing well. Imagine how things are now."

    Also, he said, there is growing anti-immigrant sentiment that he would rather not experience anymore.

    "Those of us who live here live depressed all the time, in hiding," he said. "They don't like us here, and those who love us and whom we love are far away. I prefer to go back, even if it means living in poorer conditions."

    Mr. Hubbard said tougher enforcement of immigration laws in the last few years hasn't gone unnoticed.

    "Some say companies fear hiring people without proper documents," he said.

    He said others are seeing authorities detain more people in Irving, Farmers Branch and, to a lesser degree, Carrollton.

    Carl Rusnok, spokesman for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in Dallas, said deportation of Mexican immigrants nationally has grown from 108,900 in 2005 to 136,370 last year.

    Mark López, associate director of the Pew Hispanic Center, said he has no reliable data about the number of immigrants returning to Mexico but is not surprised many are going.

    "Lower-income people – obviously including immigrants – have been disproportionately affected by the economic downturn," he said.

    Two weeks ago, the Pew center said the unemployment rate among Hispanic immigrants reached 7.5 percent in the first quarter of 2008, compared with 5.5 percent during the same quarter of last year.

    Mr. Hubbard and Mr. López say the departures could cause problems for cities, especially those that have pushed ordinances hostile to immigrants, because in scaring immigrants away, they are driving away part of their workforce along with its purchasing power.

    "If they don't like them as neighbors, they won't like them as consumers, either," said Mr. Hubbard.

    But others think that immigrants returning to their countries won't hurt the U.S. economy.

    "The country's economy adjusted to the immigrants' presence. No doubt it will adjust to their absence," said Ira Mehlman, national spokesman for FAIR, an organization opposed to illegal immigration.

    "That these people are leaving proves what we have been saying for years," he said. "If you begin enforcing the law to prevent them getting what they come here to get, they will go."

    Mr. Mehlman said FAIR would like to see more immigrants leave, not because of hard economic times but because of law enforcement.

    He said the return of Mexican immigrants to their home country would force the government there to make reforms to jump-start its economy.

    "Exporting its unemployed, underemployed citizens or those who are unhappy there allowed the Mexican government to get rid of the pressure to introduce changes for the benefit of their people," Mr. Mehlman said. "Now that their people are going back, perhaps they won't be able to shun their responsibility any longer."

    As the moment to leave came, José Luis Sánchez and his family didn't have an idea of the Mexico awaiting them. From their family, they expect everything. From their home country, not much.

    "We're going to continue living by the day, for sure," he said. "But psychologically we're going to be better. With our family, without fears, without pressures. It's worth the difficulties."

    And, he added, "The American Dream is just that – a dream."
    Give everybody guns.
    Natural selection will cull out the idiots.

  2.   
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    4,650
    Maybe this will serve as a lesson to people who are contemplating entering this country illegally. If you break our laws, do not expect to have an enjoyable experience here; this is how it should be. If you want to come here, play by the rules.

  4. #3
    good. I agree that if people are here illegally they should be kicked out. that is not fair to the rest of the people who actually try to come here legally but get denied.
    You can have my freedom as soon as I'm done with it!!!

  5. Of course there going to move back to Mexico. They are following all our jobs that went south!!!

  6. #5
    And no work here.

  7. #6
    All I have to say is:




    Adios!
    People don't like to be meddled with. We tell them what to do, what to think, don't run, don't walk. We're in their homes and in their heads and we haven't the right. We're meddlesome.--River Tam

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    I understand there's a lot of enthusiasm about tackling the illegal immigration problem, but we seem to be running really short on options for getting people to pick produce for cheap. There might be Americans who could be doing it, but they're not. Oranges are already too expensive as it is.

    Until we get some robots to do this, Mexicans might be the next best thing.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  9. #8
    After a bad ice in December last year my plae looked like a tornado went through. I couldn't find anybody willing to WORK to clean it up. I finally some guys in love and trying to get married and needed extra money. They work for one or two days until they get paid and then I never see them again. I still haven't sections not even touched. I finally was able to cut the grass in my yard for the first time in June. Grass was high but the tree branches were higher.

    Now a days our high schoolers or young men are the laziest bunch I have ever known. IT is a shame that we have more talent retiring today than is entering the work force. WE are in deep SH T as a country if our young don't stay in school and learn and work on the side to learn how to work. Parents need to STOP giving their kids things they want. They should work for it and earn it.
    Don
    Ret. MSgt
    USAF

  10. +1 on that one Apollo, The work ethic in this county is all but gone. Every one wants it now and not have to work for it.
    Calling an illegal alien an 'undocumented immigrant'
    is like calling a drug dealer an 'unlicensed pharmacist '.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Panhandle, Idaho
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by toreskha View Post
    I understand there's a lot of enthusiasm about tackling the illegal immigration problem, but we seem to be running really short on options for getting people to pick produce for cheap. There might be Americans who could be doing it, but they're not. Oranges are already too expensive as it is.

    Until we get some robots to do this, Mexicans might be the next best thing.
    Sorry, but that's a load of ...... :)

    I lived most of my life in illegal rich Southern California. I remember the days when teens would work in the fast food joints, gast stations and the like. Those not wanting to go to college could follow their fathers into construction as laborers or apprentices. The last 20 years, no way. All the low level jobs would go to illegals who didn't care if wages didn't go up in response to supply and demand.

    You can't even begin to get a job doing the grunt work in the restaurant, hotel or construction industries. It's all full up with illegals. There are 6 million (or more) more of them there and they are working somewhere. Over 200,000 of them build houses down there. Agriculture is only a small part of it.

    Now I live in Idaho, drastically different. Very few illegals in the panhandle. But there are McDonalds, Taco Bells, Burger Kings, houses get built, fields get picked etc. How is it happening? For one thing there is plenty of citizens who will to do the jobs. Plus, unbelieveibly, even with housing and expenses 1/4 to 1/2 the rate as "rich" California, entry level jobs pay 20-30% more. That's right, almost no employer pays minimum wages here. Open the paper and the classifieds start around $9.00 and go up from there.

    You won't find as many 6 figure incomes up here, but illegals aren't being financially abused here either. They aren't paid minimum wages with no benefits, no health insurance or retirement. And because of that our lowest wage earners make enough for a second job, a first job, retirement supplemental income or the like.

    In California WalMart pays $7.00 to start and median house price is $600,000. In Idaho WalMart pays $9.00 and median house price is $160,000. (I know because my neighbor recently got a job there at age 63 so she could get health benefits until medicare kicks in down the road). $9 for stocking shelves. With benefits. Try that in Los Angeles.

    As far as the cost of lettuce, it's been shown time and time again the labor cost to produce it runs under 10%. Meaning a head of iceberg going for $1 would rise to $1.10 if labor rates were doubled.

    The cost of land (and high values getting farmers to sell out), fuel, distribution, production (cleaning, packing materials, fertilizing, insecticides and the like) are the cause of our increasing prices, not labor.

    Of course the media will not tell you this. The political line is to spew forth the falsehood that no American will work in unskilled jobs. Anyone with half a brain can see that's false in places like Idaho, Montana and the Dakotas where illegal immigration is low. Someone has to be doing these jobs. Americans will not work in unskilled jobs when the wages are held artificially low by the Illegal Immigration advocates pushing their agenda which pays the illegals very little but pays them millions! I used to love seeing the immgration lawyers driving around L.A. in their $110,000 Mercedes whining that illegals were being abused by the system, our government, and those heartless right wingers.
    Last edited by Stiofan; 07-07-2008 at 09:49 AM.

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