Cop harrasing another cop.
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Thread: Cop harrasing another cop.

  1. #1

    Cop harrasing another cop.

    Here is a good video of a cop pulling over a under cover cop and things get out of hand fast.

    YouTube - Cop vs Cop

    What do you think?

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

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  3. #2
    Look out rodney long

  4. #3
    It's unfortunate that some officers think that they are above the law.
    Andrew

  5. #4
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    Sad part is that if this "undercover" cop simply stayed calm and played the role of a "citizen" and took the citations, he most likely would have gotten them dismissed in court. All he had to do is contest the citations, get a court date, then show up in court with a letter from his supervisor explaining the nature of his assignment and why the violations were necessary, then all of the "drama" could have been avoided. The guy would probably even get overtime for having to show up in court.

    It's pretty bad when folks from your own department jump in and help put you down. I'm thinking that the guy in plain clothes wasn't very popular among his peers. JMHO




    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  6. #5
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    The plainclothes officer is such a friggin' idiot. He deserved to get arrested.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    The plainclothes officer is such a friggin' idiot. He deserved to get arrested.

    +10 ... Mouthy Jerk too!
    SINCE WHEN IS IT EXTREME TO SUPPORT THE CONSTITUTION?
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  8. #7
    I Remember this one from a while back. The man who was arrested claimed that the police (not his department) where profiling to catch drug runners in the Miami area. He fought the charges in court and won because the arresting officer had been told by the judge previously that making a stop for covered county on a plate was not justified by itself. The arrested man then sued that police department, but I could not find the results on line...

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by {TEX**Hawaii(( View Post
    I Remember this one from a while back. The man who was arrested claimed that the police (not his department) where profiling to catch drug runners in the Miami area. He fought the charges in court and won because the arresting officer had been told by the judge previously that making a stop for covered county on a plate was not justified by itself. The arrested man then sued that police department, but I could not find the results on line...
    If you recall the guy's name, I could find the case any any related info.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #9
    This case is pretty old and it took me a minute to find in online. I don't think that profiling was the reason for the stop.

    Here is the link to the to the story....

    Court TV Online - Florida v. Aaron Campbell


    Florida v. Aaron Campbell
    "Traffic Stop Profiling Trial"

    In a case that may reveal the racial bias police officers use when pulling over motorists, an African-American police officer faces two charges of battery for allegedly hitting two white sheriff's officers after they stopped him for various traffic violations.
    A 27-year police veteran, Major Aaron Campbell claims white officers only stopped him because he is black.
    Major Aaron Campbell claims that he was not violating any traffic laws and that the white officers only stopped him because he is black. Campbell, a 27-year police veteran, also claims that the police initiated the attack on him after they had tried to illegally arrest him. A camera mounted on the sheriff officers' patrol car captured the entire incident on videotape that will be played during trial.

    Fight on the Florida Turnpike
    According to reports, on April 9, 1997, Campbell, 55, was driving on the Florida Turnpike when Orange County officer Richard Mankewich pulled him over for allegedly failing to use a turn signal before changing lanes. Campbell, who was on his way to work on a house that he was building, got out of his car, and identified himself as an off-duty police officer and gave Officer Mankewich his driver's license. Campbell insisted that he had not committed any traffic violations, but Mankewich kept writing the ticket, also claimed that Campbell's license tag was obscured. And Mankewich was not affected by the fact that Campbell was a fellow officer. As Mankewich proceeded to write the tickets, Campbell apparently lost his temper.

    The police videotape shows Campbell cursing at Mankewich, saying, "You're a f___ing liar, man. I gave a signal. I gave a left signal...You ain't giving me no f___ing ticket." Campbell's driver's license was clamped to his clipboard, and the defendant grabbed his license off Mankewich's clipboard. Throughout this encounter, Campbell still had his gun in his pouch; he backed away from Mankewich, leaned on the nearby guardrail and demanded to see a supervisor. "I am the supervisor...you need to give me your license or you're going to jail," Mankewich said as he called by backup officers.

    One of the deputies who arrived on the scene tried to arrest Campbell for resisting arrest, but he began to walk away. This officer then jumped on Campbell's back while Mankewich apparently sprayed the defendant in the face with pepper spray. Campbell continued to resist and ran away, with three officers running after him. He surrendered to officers after running for about a quarter-mile.

    Profiling...or a Case of "Break the Law, Go to Jail?"
    Campbell says that he was a victim of racist "profiling" techniques used by Florida police officers. Profiling refers a practice where officers use race as the principal factor in making traffic stops and trying to apprehend drug traffickers. A 1977 report by the U.S. Department of Justice revealed that Volusia County's Selective Enforcement Team used race as its chief factor in making traffic stops and that officers often made up false reasons to stop cars driven by black or Hispanic motorists in order to search for drugs (Volusia County is near Orange County, where this trial will be taking place.) The Orlando Sentinel revealed profiling practices of the Volusia officers in a Pulitzer prize-winning investigative series. The newspaper's investigation showed that while blacks and Hispanics made up only five percent of the drivers on the road, they were involved in 70 percent of the traffic stops.
    Orange County Sheriff Commander and spokesman Steve Jones reportedly denied that his officers used profiling techniques in an interview with ABC's Nightline and said the Campbell case was a simple case of "Break the law, go to jail." Jones said that Campbell's behavior warranted his arrest and that must have believed the untrue rumors about circulated about Orange County highway officers. However, while citing information from the Drug Enforcement Agency, Jones acknowledged that a profile for drug smugglers in Florida does exist; he claimed that black males smuggle most of the cocaine into Florida while Hispanic males transport heroin.

    Another phrase used to describe profiling procedures used on black motorists is "driving while black." This phrase was made famous by a civil suit filed by Robert Wilkins, a Harvard law graduate and public defender in Washington, D.C., against the Maryland Police Department. In 1992, Wilkins and his family were returning home to Washington, D.C., from a funeral in Chicago, when they were stopped by police and subjected to a search by drug-sniffing dogs. Wilkins sued the police, claiming that they had violated his civil rights, and as he was preparing for his trial, the lawyer claimed that he had obtained a police memo specifically warning officers to be on alert for "young African-American males on I-68 in the early morning in rental cars."

    Ultimately, the police settled the lawsuit with Wilkins and agreed to monitor their traffic stops. However, nearly two years after the settlement, Maryland police statistics showed that although blacks only made up for 14 percent of the drivers, 73 percent of the cars stopped on Interstate 95 between Baltimore and Delaware were driven by blacks.

    The Traffic Stops Statistics Act
    As a result of the national attention given to the Wilkins case and numerous other similar incidents around the country, the House of Representatives passed a bill sponsored by Detroit Rep. John Conyers that discourages police from using racist profiling procedures in making traffic stops and searching vehicle. The Traffic stops Statistics Act would require the Justice department to conduct a study of routine traffic stops by state and local police and determine the rationale for vehicle searches. Conyers says that evidence shows that blacks like Aaron Campbell are being routinely stopped simply because of their race. The bill, Conyers believes, will increase police awareness of the problem of targeting minorities for car searches.
    At the time of his arrest, Campbell was eight months away from retirement and appeared to have an exemplary record with over 15 commendations and no prior disciplinary actions. He is currently suspended from the police force without pay. If convicted, Campbell could face up to five years in prison but will not lose his retirement benefits. If Campbell is acquitted, he could recover the earnings he has lost since his arrest.

    But this is not merely a case about lost police wages and retirement benefits. At the end of Campbell's trial, a jury will decide whether Campbell was really a police officer out of control who thought he was above traffic laws...or whether like so many other minorities, Campbell was the victim of a police department willing to take away his rights in order to find alleged drug traffickers.

    The Split Verdict
    On April 3, 1998, after only about three hours of deliberations, an Orlando jury convicted Maj. Aaron Campbell, Jr. of only two misdemeanor counts of resisting arrest without violence, but acquitted him of the more serious battery charges. The resisting arrest charges for which Campbell was convicted focused on his altercations with officers Vincent Van Ness and Jeffrey McCowen. Originally, Campbell faced two more counts of resisting arrest against Cpl. Richard Mankewich. But, those charges involving Mankewich were dismissed during trial when Judge Thomas Mihok ruled that Mankewich's traffic stop of Campbell was illegal.
    On April 20, 1998, Campbell was sentenced to one-year probation, 75 hours of community service, and fined $750 and additional court costs. And one of his convictions for resisting arrest without violence was dismissed on the basis of double jeopardy.

  11. #10
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    Orange County should have fought this more. It sets a bad precedent for people feeling that they can resist arrest and get away with it, along with some LEOs believing that they are above the laws normally obeyed by everyone else.

    Maybe they did use racial profiling, but that's no excuse to get violent over a minor traffic incident. Campbell vastly overreacted and broke the law himself. He should have taken the ticket, then filed the lawsuit and he would have been entirely in the right. As it is, he ended up making a total fool of himself.

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