Praying Hands
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Thread: Praying Hands

  1. #1

    Praying Hands

    Attachment 10546


    From my email today.


    Subject: Fwd: Story behind "The Praying Hands"

    Please take the time to read this. You will never look at a picture of "The Praying Hands" the same way again.


    Many of us have seen the picture of The Praying Hands, also present in many Christian homes, but would almost certainly not have heard the moving story behind this popular picture.

    Here is the story. An excellent read!

    THE STORY BEHIND THE PICTURE OF THE PRAYING HANDS

    Back in the fifteenth century, in a tiny village near Nuremberg , lived a family with eighteen children. Eighteen! In order merely to keep food on the table for this mob, the father and head of the household, a goldsmith by profession, worked almost eighteen hours a day at his trade and any other paying chore he could find in the neighborhood.

    Despite their seemingly hopeless condition, two of the elder children, Albrecht and Albert, had a dream. They both wanted to pursue their talent for art, but they knew full well that their father would never be financially able to send either of them to Nuremberg to study at the Academy.

    After many long discussions at night in their crowded bed, the two boys finally worked out a pact. They would toss a coin. The loser would go down into the nearby mines and, with his earnings, support his brother while he attended the academy. Then, when that brother who won the toss completed his studies, in four years, he would support the other brother at the academy, either with sales of his artwork or, if necessary, also by laboring in the mines.

    They tossed a coin on a Sunday morning after church. Albrecht Durer won the toss and went off to Nuremberg.

    Albert went down into the dangerous mines and, for the next four years, financed his brother, whose work at the academy was almost an immediate sensation. Albrecht's etchings, his woodcuts, and his oils were far better than those of most of his professors, and by the time he graduated, he was beginning to earn considerable fees for his commissioned works.

    When the young artist returned to his village, the Durer family held a festive dinner on their lawn to celebrate Albrecht's triumphant homecoming. After a long and memorable meal, punctuated with music and laughter, Albrecht rose from his honored position at the head of the table to drink a toast to his beloved brother for the years of sacrifice that had enabled Albrecht to fulfill his ambition. His closing words were, "And now, Albert, blessed brother of mine, now it is your turn. Now you can go to
    Nuremberg to pursue your dream, and I will take care of you."

    All heads turned in eager expectation to the far end of the table where Albert sat, tears streaming down his pale face, shaking his lowered head from side to side while he sobbed and repeated, over and over, "No...no....no ..no." Finally, Albert rose and wiped the tears from his cheeks. He glanced down the long table at the faces he loved, and then, holding his hands close to his right cheek, he said softly, "No, brother. I cannot go to Nuremberg. It is too late for me. Look ... Look what four years in the mines have done to my hands! The bones in every finger have been smashed at least once, and lately I have been suffering from arthritis so badly in my right hand that I
    cannot even hold a glass to return your toast, much less make delicate lines on parchment or canvas with a pen or a brush. No, brother ....for me it is too late."

    More than 450 years have passed. By now, Albrecht Durer's hundreds of masterful portraits, pen and silver-point sketches, water colors, charcoals, woodcuts, and copper engravings hang in every great museum in the world, but the odds are great that you, like most people, are familiar with only one of Albrecht Durer's works. More than merely being familiar with it, you very well may have a reproduction hanging in your home or office.

    One day, to pay homage to Albert for all that he had sacrificed, Albrecht Durer painstakingly drew his brother's abused hands with palms together and thin fingers stretched skyward. He called his powerful drawing simply "Hands," but the entire world almost immediately opened their hearts to his great masterpiece and renamed his tribute of love "The Praying Hands." The next time you see a copy of that touching creation, take a second look. Let it be your reminder, that no one - no one - ever makes it alone!


    "The LORD bless you and keep you; the LORD make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; the LORD turn his face toward you and give you peace."

  2.   
  3. This is a utter piece of fiction! As many learned in high school Albrecht Durer was given by his father at 14 or 15 as a apprentice! This is not of his brothers hands but a study for a painting the Heler Altar.. Fact checking used to be a standard thing. Please let me know ur email address. My cousin in Dubai has some lottery winnings for you..

  4. #3
    In case you missed it, I said it was from my email today. I didn't author or authenticate it. I appreciate the picture of the hands for what they mean to me. personally. The story, true or false, was still interesting but, as usual, when you see something with any possible connection to religion, you seem to just go ape ****. Lighten up old son before you get ulcers.

    Attachment 10548

  5. #4
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    Could be that the person who emailed Oldgrunt had found this website:
    Albrecht Durer's Praying Hands

    It's word for word the exact composition of what Oldgrunt posted.

    However, the actual model of the hands is truly unknown. There is some medical evidence to suggest that if the hands had been modeled it was someone with possibly rheumatoid arthritis or similar ailement. This is a very interesting read about Albrecht Durer and has a physician by the name of Sharma who has analyzed the "hands" and given a medical point of view of them. He adds that because of the physical suffering in the hands, that this piece has a two-fold meaning; first it shows the suffering of mankind and secondly, it shows the dependence upon divine aid.
    Hektoen International

    Since the model for the hands is unknown, there are many speculations as to who the actual model was. IMO, I think that this "mystery" lends more beauty to the work.

    Oldgrunt, thanks for a good story. It was touching, regardless of the historical inaccuracies. In addition, I need to thank Maine surprisingly. It was your pomposity that led me to read up about Albrecht Durer and share the information I did. I hadn't even known the name of this artist and my family had a copy of the "praying hands" in our household. My high school never taught me about him and I didn't learn about him in any art appreciation classes in college either. I take umbrage with your statement but thank you in the same breath, since I have learned something today.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  6. Quote Originally Posted by Oldgrunt View Post
    In case you missed it, I said it was from my email today. I didn't author or authenticate it. I appreciate the picture of the hands for what they mean to me. personally. The story, true or false, was still interesting but, as usual, when you see something with any possible connection to religion, you seem to just go ape ****. Lighten up old son before you get ulcers.

    Attachment 10548
    Ok you just brought religion into this not me. I know you did not authenticate it as it is wholly fiction. The drawing was a study for what was also a religions work but that does not in any way negate the beauty of it.

  7. #6
    Two hands working can do more than a millions clasped in prayer.
    “Religion is an insult to human dignity. Without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things.
    But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.” ― Steven Weinberg

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by XD40scinNC View Post
    Two hands working can do more than a millions clasped in prayer.
    That's what the ones who sentenced Jesus to die thought too.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    That's what the ones who sentenced Jesus to die thought too.
    according to the ancient folklore of goat herders.
    “Religion is an insult to human dignity. Without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things.
    But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.” ― Steven Weinberg

  10. #9
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    wolf...I think some of the anti Jesus folks on this forum were never endowed by their creator. Who the hell endowed them?

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimTh View Post
    wolf...I think some of the anti Jesus folks on this forum were never endowed by their creator. Who the hell endowed them?
    I would have to say if the Creator endowed us with rights and one didn't believe that he/she had a Creator then the Creator may have decided that they were not deserving of their rights. Very astute.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

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