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Thread: Who knows their physics? Punching...

  1. #11
    No statement should be believed because it is made by an authority.
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  3. #12
    Join Date
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    Pasco, Washington, United States
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    Good video.

    When we were talking about vehicular crashes in the FD and EMS training, we looked at the kinetic energy formula. It's important to see that velocity plays a much bigger impact on energy than mass does. For example:

    1/2Mass * velocity^2 = KE

    180 (lbs) hitting at 20 (mph) = (180/2)20^2 = 90 * 400 = 36000
    180 (lbs) hitting at 40 (mph) = (180/2)40^2 = 90 * 1600 = 144000
    220 (lbs) hitting at 20 (mph) = (220/2)20^2 = 110 * 400 = 44000
    220 (lbs) hitting at 40 (mph) = (220/2)40^2 = 110 * 1600 = 176000

    The velocity of the hit will change the KE dramatically compared to the weight behind the hit. Someone who is 40 lbs less than his opponent can hit 3 times harder if he knows how to strike effectively. If energy is used to slow and stop the strike (not follow through), hitting not being at it's peak velocity, the loss of energy transfer is substantial. I would say following through is more important in that aspect, making sure peak velocity is occurring, than is contact time with the intended target.

    On the other hand, striking so hard you stop or are unable to protect yourself from a counter strike is risky. I guess, striking as fast and hard as possible without losing your balance or defense is the goal, and unless there is a lot of training, I don't see how striking while following through can be done while keeping up your defense...I mean how many times have I swung my golf club and lost balance and fell to the side? Lost count...

    Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee...and dance like a ballerina...and practice your golf swing? Yup...the key's to living a happy life...
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #13
    ezkl2230 Guest
    This is basically the reasoning behind martial arts instruction, in which they teach the student to essentially aim at a point beyond the attacker and then punch THROUGH the attacker.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighterchen View Post
    Good video.

    When we were talking about vehicular crashes in the FD and EMS training, we looked at the kinetic energy formula. It's important to see that velocity plays a much bigger impact on energy than mass does. For example:

    1/2Mass * velocity^2 = KE

    180 (lbs) hitting at 20 (mph) = (180/2)20^2 = 90 * 400 = 36000
    180 (lbs) hitting at 40 (mph) = (180/2)40^2 = 90 * 1600 = 144000
    220 (lbs) hitting at 20 (mph) = (220/2)20^2 = 110 * 400 = 44000
    220 (lbs) hitting at 40 (mph) = (220/2)40^2 = 110 * 1600 = 176000

    The velocity of the hit will change the KE dramatically compared to the weight behind the hit. Someone who is 40 lbs less than his opponent can hit 3 times harder if he knows how to strike effectively. If energy is used to slow and stop the strike (not follow through), hitting not being at it's peak velocity, the loss of energy transfer is substantial. I would say following through is more important in that aspect, making sure peak velocity is occurring, than is contact time with the intended target.

    On the other hand, striking so hard you stop or are unable to protect yourself from a counter strike is risky. I guess, striking as fast and hard as possible without losing your balance or defense is the goal, and unless there is a lot of training, I don't see how striking while following through can be done while keeping up your defense...I mean how many times have I swung my golf club and lost balance and fell to the side? Lost count...

    Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee...and dance like a ballerina...and practice your golf swing? Yup...the key's to living a happy life...
    This is why a slightly less massive bullet with higher velocity generally over penetrates. A heavier bullet with a little less velocity but with the same KE as a smaller mass bullet generally will do more damage.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  6. #15
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by ezkl2230 View Post
    This is basically the reasoning behind martial arts instruction, in which they teach the student to essentially aim at a point beyond the attacker and then punch THROUGH the attacker.

    Exactly how I was taught to beat up pine board planks. Although, I've never been in a fight with a pine board plank, I know I can defeat them soundly.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  7. #16
    If by "following through" you mean allowing your fist to be stopped by your target, then yes, you cause more tissue damage that way. It's kind of like the difference between a jab and a punch, which is what I believe firefighterchen was alluding to? However, there are a few other things you can do to increase damage. One is learning to use your hips to transfer your body weight and motion into power. The second thing I personally would reccommend is developing your personal technique...ie stance, developing muscle memory through supervised regular training, arm-hand bone alignment (transfer of power, lessened chance for injury to yourself)..

    I train under a world famous Karate instructor and one of the heads of the Shorinkan system (known online as "the biker sensei") and have for a few years. Take it or leave it, just offering my two cents.

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