EPG car window glass
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Thread: EPG car window glass

  1. #1
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    EPG car window glass

    This sounds interesting - the article is from 2000 and I guess these are on some newer vehicles, but I haven't heard about it in most cars yet. Sounds like a no-brainer way to make car theft a more difficult job.

    EPG made with polyvinyl butyral (PVB) is a new category of laminated glass designed specifically for use in vehicle side and rear windows. It deters smash-and-grab theft by increasing the time it takes to break through a vehicle window. While the glass will crack after repeated impacts, it remains adhered to the tough plastic interlayer, providing an effective barrier against smash-and-grab thieves. In fact, tests have shown that it may take up to two minutes to break into an EPG-equipped vehicle.
    I wonder if this is available for people who want it put on their vehicles? Might be nice to have.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

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  3. #2
    wolfhunter Guest
    Look for Saflex or Vanceva (TM) when shopping for new car windows. Saflex is a division of Solutia, Vanceva is their EPG product.

  4. #3
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    Sounds great in limiting the probability of theft, but I'm not sure if I'd like it on my vehicles. In the event of an auto collision or other situation in my vehicle, when seconds count, and the first responders need to get in or I need to get out, this may be a "bad" thing.

    Insurance will replace my stolen property, but won't do too much good when it comes to human life.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  5. #4
    wolfhunter Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Sounds great in limiting the probability of theft, but I'm not sure if I'd like it on my vehicles. In the event of an auto collision or other situation in my vehicle, when seconds count, and the first responders need to get in or I need to get out, this may be a "bad" thing.

    Insurance will replace my stolen property, but won't do too much good when it comes to human life.



    gf
    Many of the articles I found are from 2001 or 2002, and several of them were in fire fighter/emergency response websites. Apparently this material is being used in some European cars (Volvo, for one) and responders are being trained to deal with it. It breaks and peals similarly to a windshield.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfhunter View Post
    Many of the articles I found are from 2001 or 2002, and several of them were in fire fighter/emergency response websites. Apparently this material is being used in some European cars (Volvo, for one) and responders are being trained to deal with it. It breaks and peals similarly to a windshield.
    As long as the first responders know about it and how to breach the glass, then it's good in that respect. That still leaves the consideration of how the people INSIDE the vehicle will breach the glass if the need were to arise. A good example would be if the car ended up in a lake or a possible roll-over with the vehicle on fire.

    I'm still not sold on wanting to have it on my vehicles.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    As long as the first responders know about it and how to breach the glass, then it's good in that respect. That still leaves the consideration of how the people INSIDE the vehicle will breach the glass if the need were to arise. A good example would be if the car ended up in a lake or a possible roll-over with the vehicle on fire.

    I'm still not sold on wanting to have it on my vehicles.



    gf
    They use something like it in school buses and aircraft. That seems to be working out ok. EPG glass or not, an effective solution to glass breaching might be a built-in manual emergency lever that will either open the window, or the entire door, just as with buses and aircraft.

    Alternately (or additionally), crash sensors could be set to a mechanism that would release the windows in the event of a severe impact or fire. That solves the problem of flying glass and rescuer access, the windows may be able to be reused once they're recovered, and it's also a huge deterrent to hit-and-runs. Toyotas have the VIN number etched into the windows, and a smashed car driving around with no windows would be fairly obvious.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  8. #7
    Playing Devil's Advocate:

    I don't think I want a sensor or computer tp make the decision to open the windows for me. Too many 'what if's'
    What if I crash and the fire is on the outside? Do I want the windows to open and have flames licking in through the now open windows?
    What if I roll over? how am I getting the windows up (down)?
    Too many what ifs. Think of the beginning days of air bag deployments. For several cars, all it took was a good 'thump' on the bumper to set them off. Can you see car jackers going around trying to set the windows off?

    And your standard spring loaded nail set won't work anymore in getting you out in a hurry, you'll need a carpet knife, too...
    N38 19' 56.52" W85 45' 8.56"
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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by starbasessd View Post
    Playing Devil's Advocate:

    I don't think I want a sensor or computer tp make the decision to open the windows for me. Too many 'what if's'
    What if I crash and the fire is on the outside? Do I want the windows to open and have flames licking in through the now open windows?
    What if I roll over? how am I getting the windows up (down)?
    Too many what ifs. Think of the beginning days of air bag deployments. For several cars, all it took was a good 'thump' on the bumper to set them off. Can you see car jackers going around trying to set the windows off?
    It's a concept, not a finished idea. In any case, I doubt that auto glass will protect you from either fire or carjackers. In fact, the biggest problem with EPG during an accident would be skulls impacting glass that doesn't break (which can be mitigated by seatbelts and side-curtain airbags). Car accidents involving fires and bodies of water are rare.

    However, I have always liked the idea of a manual emergency release inside the door. At least, cars with power windows should have a way to manually roll down the window in an emergency.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  10. #9
    wolfhunter Guest
    Toreskha, the EPG glass breaks just like the front windshield. It just has a layer of material between two sheets of glass. Break the window and cut the laminate to clear a window.

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