How's your knife...
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Thread: How's your knife...

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Lightbulb How's your knife...

    recieved this a few days ago, sage advice from someone that knows....

    Ten Points About The Fighting Knife

    1). The knife is always with you, even in places where the gun cannot go.

    2). It becomes the first line of weaponry when the pistol is not available by choice, policy, inaccessibility or loss.

    3). If things have gotten bad enough to need the knife, the use of the knife should be aggressive, brutal and terminal, and not "defensive".

    4). There is a place for using a knife against the unarmed adversary if that adversary is younger, stronger or faster than you are...or more numerous.

    5). There is a place for keeping them away with your edge, but there is also a place for closing and stabbing.

    6). A knife worthy of combat carry should facilitate stabbing and be simple and instictive to use.

    7). The more complicated and complex a knife is, and the more elaborate its system of use, the less desirable it is.

    8). Conversely, the simpler the knife and the system and more gross motor dependant it is, the better it will do in a fight.

    9). A fixed blade is more desirable than a folder, but a folder may be required in some applications. If a folder is used, the lock should be robust and not technically clever.

    10). Learn to be violent with your knife



    Ten Attributes To Select Your Fighting Knife

    1). Sharp as hell and pointy as *******, you can't stab anyone or cut anyone with a dull round nosed blade. If this sounds vulgar, it is. There is nothing dainty about ramming a 3" piece of steel into a man's thrioat and tiwsting it as he fights to get it out.

    2). Point in line with the handle. Upswept blades may be the acme of the knifemaker artist, but they suck eggs for ramming through a clavicle.

    3). Long enough...but not too long. We hear that about lots of things.

    4). Rough handle. Either G-10 or rough designed zytel handles. When you stab another man, his juices will get all over your blade and hand.

    5). Solid lock. Liner locks suck. I don't care how graceful or cool they are...they suck. Axis lock as seen with benchmade or with Cold Steel is the way to go, or with an old style lockback design.

    6). Solid opening method. This being 2009, and the "Wave" concept being as old as the pyramids now....a combat blade should have a wave feature if it is a folder.

    7). Good steel. That does NOT mean stainless. I don't give an airborne fornication about stains on my knife...I WANT IT SHARP!

    8). Again, if a folder, it needs a movable clip so operators may carry it as desired. The more I work on this Killing-focused system, the more I am liking reverse grip - edge in. That means for a righty, you carry point up- blade forward.

    9). It must be cost-effective. Notice I did not say CHEAP. Cheap knives are for fags. Cost-effective means that if I decide to ditch it, I will not be heart broken to lose my special one-of-a-kind....nor will that special one-of-a-kind be tied to me.

    10). There should be a boatload of them out there in society....like Glocks. Thus you cannot be identified or tied to the gear you use.

    If some of this stuff sounds like it comes from the world of the criminal rather than the world of the law abiding good guy, it does. One does not go to a clean shaven altar boy to learn to cut a throat.


    Ten Points About Using The Knife In A Fight

    1). A fighting is knife is fueled by rage and ferocity, not by cleverness and showmanship. I recall seeing CWS go ape (or was it AMOK) on a knife expert we brought in one year. The best the very clever and artistic knife expert could do was match CWS stab for stab. But that was after CWS had stabbed him three or four times.

    2). Learn to stab....HARD

    3). Learn to hold the knife in a way that you will not lose it when you STAB HARD.

    4). Since few of us go about with a 10" bowie, learn your targets. You may not be able to behead an attacker, but you can in fact rip out his jugular even with a 2" box cutter.

    5). Footwork gets you off the line of the attack, but also gets you close enough to STAB HIM HARD.

    6). The instant you pull steel your intent should be to stick it in his neck and rip it out a different way, and not to spar, fend, or ask him to stay back.

    7). The grip area of your knife MUST be rough enough to stay in your hand if your hand is covered with blood (hopefully not yours).

    8). The point must be in line with your stab. A Cold Steel Scimitar of a Spyderco Chinook do not have this, but a Cold Steel AK-47 and a Spyderco Endura do.

    9). To train it, each knife must have an identical trainer (dulled knife) and a wooden/rubberized trainer (like Nok's). The identical trainer is used for technical and access drills. The wooden type trainer is used for attacking the heavy bag or the stabbing post.

    10). Contrary to the advice of others, use your fighting knife for everything. From opening letters to cutting cheese or tomatoes. Handle your knife daily, keep it sharp, keep it handy. make accessing it as natural as scratching your butt.
    __________________


    Gabe Suarez

    One Source Tactical
    Suarez International USA
    Christian Warrior Ministries
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century
    "Don't be so open minded that your brains fall out!" Father John Corapi.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    Good, yet true read. My knife of choice is the TDI Ka-Bar shown here:

    KA-BAR Knives: KABAR TDI Law Enforcement Knife, KA-1480
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #3
    Liner locks suck.
    I agree, but knives with the "old style lockback design" aren't very good for defense either.

    I prefer a frame lock or Benchmade style Axis lock. I don't mind a liner lock if it has a backup mechanism to prevent unintentional disengagement of the blade, like some CRKT and Gerber knives feature.

    I always carry at least two folders, typically a Zero Tolerance 0301 and a CRKT M16-14SF. If I want lighter weight, I substitute my Benchmade Mini-Griptilion for the Zero Tolerance knife.

    My fixed blade of choice is the Bark River Knife & Tool Bravo 1, which was developed with the assistance of the Training Unit of the Force Recon Division of the U.S. Marine Corp.

    The 1st rule of knife fighting: Don't!!
    The 2nd rule: Have a good knife.
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrellM5 View Post
    The 1st rule of knife fighting: Don't!!
    The 2nd rule: Have a good knife.
    Yeah being attacked by someone wielding a knife scares me more than if they were to have a gun. I have taken several of Gabe's classes one of them about knifes, and it is scary work....
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century
    "Don't be so open minded that your brains fall out!" Father John Corapi.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wesley Chapel NC
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    Automatic

    Anyone carry a fully auto side folder? I am thinking of getting one. Maybe a Boker, Schrade, CRKT or drop the dough and get a Buck auto. Blade Play - Switchblade Knives, Automatic Knives, Spring Assist Knives, Butterfly Knives, Military Knives, Law Enforcement Knives, Collectible Knives

  7. #6
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  8. #7
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    Sep 2007
    Location
    Gray Court, SC
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    I picked up a Kershaw K.O. Tactical Blur K1670TBLKST last week and I'm very impressed with this knife. Great grip, sharp point and a very fast solid spring assist. I'm a fan of Tanto blades so I had to buy it.

    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

  9. #8
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    Sep 2007
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    I love my Kershaw but no auto knifes here in MI and Kershaw was considered an automatic knife my our last AG which happens to be our soon to be EX govenor.... our present AG fixed it in a ruling that they are not automatic as it requires you to instigate the opening of the blade manually and it is considered a spring assist....
    "The sword dose not cause the murder, and the maker of the sword dose not bear sin" Rabbi Solomon ben Isaac 11th century
    "Don't be so open minded that your brains fall out!" Father John Corapi.

  10. I like emerson Emerson Knives supper sharp easy to resharpen quivk to open and great all a round
    Leas from the front and others will follow
    The man is just trying to keep a cracker down.

  11. #10
    I really like the Emerson's as well. I just wish they had something more confidence inspiring than a liner lock. The wave opening feature is awesome. It's actually faster to deploy than a switchblade. I have the Super Karambit II. I really like it other than the tendency for the blade to partially open in my pocket. I just don't put my hand in that pocket when I'm carrying it.
    "When the outflow exceeds the inflow, the upkeep becomes the downfall"

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