Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
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Thread: Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears

  1. #1

    Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears

    Welcome to the New World Order. It is later than you think!


    Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears | National Headlines from AP | Star-Telegram.com

    Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
    By TODD LEWAN
    AP National Writer
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    Climbing into his Volvo, outfitted with a Matrics antenna and a Motorola reader he'd bought on eBay for $190, Chris Paget cruised the streets of San Francisco with this objective: To read the identity cards of strangers, wirelessly, without ever leaving his car.

    It took him 20 minutes to strike hacker's gold.

    Zipping past Fisherman's Wharf, his scanner downloaded to his laptop the unique serial numbers of two pedestrians' electronic U.S. passport cards embedded with radio frequency identification, or RFID, tags. Within an hour, he'd "skimmed" four more of the new, microchipped PASS cards from a distance of 20 feet.

    Increasingly, government officials are promoting the chipping of identity documents as a 21st century application of technology that will help speed border crossings, safeguard credentials against counterfeiters, and keep terrorists from sneaking into the country.

    But Paget's February experiment demonstrated something privacy advocates had feared for years: That RFID, coupled with other technologies, could make people trackable without their knowledge.

    He filmed his heist, and soon his video went viral on the Web, intensifying a debate over a push by government, federal and state, to put tracking technologies in identity documents and over their potential to erode privacy.

    Putting a traceable RFID in every pocket has the potential to make everybody a blip on someone's radar screen, critics say, and to redefine Orwellian government snooping for the digital age.

    "Little Brother," some are already calling it - even though elements of the global surveillance web they warn against exist only on drawing boards, neither available nor approved for use.

    But with advances in tracking technologies coming at an ever-faster rate, critics say, it won't be long before governments could be able to identify and track anyone in real time, 24-7, from a cafe in Paris to the shores of California.

    On June 1, it became mandatory for Americans entering the United States by land or sea from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda and the Caribbean to present identity documents embedded with RFID tags, though conventional passports remain valid until they expire.

    Among new options are the chipped "e-passport," and the new, electronic PASS card - credit-card sized, with the bearer's digital photograph and a chip that can be scanned through a pocket, backpack or purse from 30 feet.

    Alternatively, travelers can use "enhanced" driver's licenses embedded with RFID tags now being issued in some border states: Washington, Vermont, Michigan and New York. Texas and Arizona have entered into agreements with the federal government to offer chipped licenses, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has recommended expansion to non-border states. Kansas and Florida officials have received DHS briefings on the licenses, agency records show.

    The purpose of using RFID is not to identify people, says Mary Ellen Callahan, the chief privacy officer at Homeland Security, but "to verify that the identification document holds valid information about you."

    An RFID document that doubles as a U.S. travel credential "only makes it easier to pull the right record fast enough, to make sure that the border flows, and is operational" - even though a 2005 Government Accountability Office report found that government RFID readers often failed to detect travelers' tags.

    Critics warn that RFID-tagged identities will enable identity thieves and other criminals to commit "contactless" crimes against victims who won't immediately know they've been violated.

    Neville Pattinson, vice president for government affairs at Gemalto, Inc., a major supplier of microchipped cards, is no RFID basher. He's a board member of the Smart Card Alliance, an RFID industry group, and is serving on the Department of Homeland Security's Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee.

    In a 2007 article published by a newsletter for privacy professionals, Pattinson called the chipped cards vulnerable "to attacks from hackers, identity thieves and possibly even terrorists."
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

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  3. #2
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    Dumbasses. To quote Pogo, once again: "We have met the enemy...and he is us!"
    NRA Life; GOA Life; CCRKBA Life; Trustee, NJCSD; F&AM: 32 & KT
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  4. #3
    I read about this a a book that's been around for some time now. It's called, simply, the Bible. Even if you are not a "follower," you might want to pick one up and read the last book in the New Testament - the title is Revelation. You can say what you want about it, but for a book written 2000 years ago, the Bible has some very disturbing prophecies that are coming to light right now. If you read through the allegory (contrary to popular belief, we Christians do NOT take every word in the Bible as literal - allegory is still allegory to us), you will see a lot of what is happening now.

    Question - what do you need to produce:

    • To use your credit card ( lot of the time)
    • Travel by train or plane
    • Drive or rent a car
    • Establish a bank account
    • Buy a GUN


    And more. You can see where this is going. Pretty soon, you will not be able to do ANYTHING without an ID card/driver's license/passport. And that ID will be an RFID device of some kind. There are already proposals to have a 'chip' implanted in every new-born. And some adult have already had medical chips implanted. These chips (as technology improves) will be able to be tracked by GPS. Used in cooperation with the coming ubiquitous camera monitors, rapidly appearing all over the country (and in EU they are used in much more than traffic situations), there won't be anywhere Big Brother cannot find you.

    And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:

    And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. - Revelation 13: 16-17
    -= Piece Corps =-

  5. #4
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    A few seconds in a microwave will take care of the chips.
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Red Hat View Post
    A few seconds in a microwave will take care of the chips.
    That would have been my next suggestion. "What? You can't read my D/L? Why, that's preposterous! Anyway, here it is, and you can definitely see that it's me. Sorry, officer"
    -= Piece Corps =-

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