PC Nonsense and Hasan
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    PC Nonsense and Hasan

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    /opinion/2009/11/10/stiletto-hasan-crazy-terrorist-jihadi-military
    by The Stiletto
    - FOXNews.com
    - November 10, 2009
    PC Nonsense and Hasan

    With his sworn duty to his country increasingly at odds with his perceived duty to Islam, the likeliest scenario is that the suspect in the Ft. Hood murders was both mentally unstable and a jihadi.


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    Perhaps recalling the brouhaha that erupted when he reflexively blamed police officer Sgt. James Crowley for the chain of events that culminated in the arrest of Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr., President Obama was loathe to attribute the apparently premeditated bloodbath allegedly perpetrated by Muslim-American soldier Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan to homegrown Islamic terrorism in a Rose Garden statement the next morning:

    "We don't know all the answers yet. And I would caution against jumping to conclusions until we have all the facts."

    The Washington Post notes that in his weekly radio address on Saturday, Obama "convicted" Hasan of murder, having forgotten to use the qualifiers "suspected" or "alleged":

    This past Thursday, on a clear Texas afternoon, an Army psychiatrist walked into the Soldier Readiness Processing Center, and began shooting his fellow soldiers.

    But by then, Obama knew more about Hasan than he knew about Crowley when he jumped feet-first into the white cop-black arrestee dispute -- yet, he refused to raise the possibility that this could have been an act of jihad. The media had already reported that Hasan:

    - Was "devout," prayed at daily at the mosque and wore traditional Muslim dress when off duty;

    - Was deeply conflicted by his religion and noted that the Koran instructs Muslims not to form alliances with Jews or Christians;

    - Had worshipped at a mosque in 2001 that was led by radical imam Anwar al-Awlaki , believed to be a "spiritual adviser" to three of the Sept 11, 2001 hijackers -- and may have met two of them;

    - Joined an Islamic matchmaking service looking for a wife who wore the hijab and prayed five times a day;

    - Had given away his possessions over the preceding several days;

    - Openly voiced his opposition to the anti-terror wars in Afghanistan and Iraq in terms that were described as anti-American propaganda, and had also made anti-Semitic comments;

    - Is believed to have posted comments on the Internet sympathetic to homicide bombers -- allegedly comparing them to soldiers who fall on grenades to save comrades;

    - Is reported by eye-witnesses to have shouted "Allahu akbar!" ("God is great!") before "calmly" killing 13 people and wounding 38 others.

    And now we have learned that the army was tipped off by U.S. intelligence months ago that Hasan was trying to e-mail Al Qaeda associates. They were also told not to jump to any conclusions, until FBI and military investigators were able to confirm what our post-9/11 gut instinct tells us is the probable motive for yet another Muslim to act out his outrage in a murderous rampage against Infidels (that is to say, Christians and Jews). So let's all just play along and pretend we really don't know "why" Hasan did it.

    Unfortunately, The Washington Post doesn't want to play by Obama's rules and has already jumped to the conclusion that "the terrible crime of which Maj. Hasan is accused was not the expression of any faith, nor the work of a terrorist organization, but rather, it appears, the act of an evil or deranged individual."

    It's hard to draw too many conclusions right now," writes Newsweek's Andrew Bast, but then he, too, jumps to a conclusion:

    "[T]he U.S. military could well be reaching a breaking point as the president decides to send more troops into Afghanistan" -- soldiers and their families are living, and bending, under a harrowing and unrelenting stress that will not let up any time soon" -- it isn't much of a leap to argue that to further tax our military would do as much as anything to guarantee that the homegrown terror on display today could well repeat itself in the future."

    For his part, New York Post columnist Ralph Peters does not want to play this game, and contends that "[p]olitical correctness killed those patriotic Americans at Fort Hood as surely as the Islamist gunman did":

    [N]o officer in his chain of command, either at Walter Reed Army Medical Center or at Fort Hood, had the guts to take meaningful action against a dysfunctional soldier and an incompetent doctor.

    [O]fficers fear charges of discrimination when faced with misconduct among protected minorities.

    The chain of command protected a budding terrorist who was waving one red flag after another. Because it was safer for careers than doing something about him.


    But when do we, the American public, knock off the PC nonsense?

    As psychoanalyst Ken Eisold notes on PsychologyToday.com, "[s]truggling as we all are to make sense of this tragic incident, none of us can help bringing our own perspectives to bear on it":

    [[B
    [L]iberals tend to see this as an act of individual madness, which is how the right tends to think of liberals: always explaining away such actions, blinding themselves to the real dangers of conspiracy."][/B]

    The right, on the other hand, usually committed to the rights on individuals, sees no individuals at all in this scenario. A Muslim is a Muslim and a likely terrorist. They know what they know.

    Well, here's what one of columnist Rod Dreher's neighbors knows :

    "Her soldier son worked with Hasan on the base back East. She said he described Hasan as unfriendly, a loner. And she said, 'He told me there's no way Hasan is crazy. He knew what he was doing.'"

    Oh, and one more thing: While it's true that non-Muslim soldiers have also "snapped" and turned on their brothers in arms and that military counselors and chaplains are under emotional strain themselves, it doesn't necessarily follow that Hasan merely snapped and was not a jihadi. With his sworn duty to his country increasingly at odds with his perceived duty to Islam, the likeliest scenario is that he was both mentally unstable and a jihadi.

    The Stiletto blogs at The Stiletto.com.



    L]iberals tend to see this as an act of individual madness, which is how the right tends to think of liberals: always explaining away such actions, blinding themselves to the real dangers of conspiracy."]

    The right, on the other hand, usually committed to the rights on individuals, sees no individuals at all in this scenario. A Muslim is a Muslim and a likely terrorist. They know what they know.
    [/B]

    EXACTLY
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

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  3. #2
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    To me it's nothing short of shameful how those on the fringes of both sides of the ideological spectrum are politicizing this incident; this incident should not be used to promote gun rights (although if someone on that base had been armed, Hasan could've been stopped and lives saved) or more gun control or what do do about PTSD. The fact is, a mentally disturbed Islamic extremist who never should've been wearing the uniform of the United States shot close to 50 people that day and all political ideologues can think about is what the incident means for their cause. Sure, I have concerns about what it means for me, but above all, my thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Oh, and one more thing: political correctness kills! 'Nuff said!
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #3

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    To me it's nothing short of shameful how those on the fringes of both sides of the ideological spectrum are politicizing this incident; this incident should not be used to promote gun rights (although if someone on that base had been armed, Hasan could've been stopped and lives saved) or more gun control or what do do about PTSD. The fact is, a mentally disturbed Islamic extremist who never should've been wearing the uniform of the United States shot close to 50 people that day and all political ideologues can think about is what the incident means for their cause. Sure, I have concerns about what it means for me, but above all, my thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. Oh, and one more thing: political correctness kills! 'Nuff said!
    Could not have said it better myself.

    Hasan was long gone....a long time ago....the situation should have never escilated to this point..

    Hopefully other Muslims serving will not be condemed or hated for ONE persons actions

  5. #4
    Isn't "mentally-disturbed Islamic extremist" redundant?

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by IheartTedNugent View Post
    Could not have said it better myself.

    Hasan was long gone....a long time ago....the situation should have never escilated to this point..

    Hopefully other Muslims serving will not be condemed or hated for ONE persons actions
    They may not be condemned or hated, but they might not be trusted, and that's a real problem.

  7. #6
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    Exclamation Heres the deal

    As long as the subscribe to Islam they will not be trusted by Jews or Christians.
    You see Israel is and always will be God's chosen people. The Bible says God blesses those that bless Israel and that God curses those who curse Israel. HOW DO YOU THINK THE LORD GOD ALMIGHTY FEELS ABOUT A RELIGION THAT IS PREACHING THE DESTRUCTION OF ISRAEL??????
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

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