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Thread: Convicted Felon Tests 2A

  1. Yes sir that is true.JMHO.I do however agree with you.Ishi

  2.   
  3. #12
    I don't claim to have all the answers,either.I don't even claim to have alot of them.But I do agree with you,Ishi.The Constitution must come before everything else and be what it was meant to be in the beginning,before Congress and other members of government forgot it was;the supreme law of the land.
    Give everybody guns.
    Natural selection will cull out the idiots.

  4. #13
    I agree with ecocks statement:
    Quote Originally Posted by ecocks View Post
    I have no problem with a person who has served their sentence having a gun as long as they have really paid their debt and set out to become a responsible citizen. However, ...
    We have that mechanism now. But the BATFE/Att'y Gen refuses to use it.

    A convicted person can apply to have rights restored. But the BATFE/Att'y Gen has not processed any applications for many years, citing a lack of funding.

    THAT, in itself, is an injustice. You can safely bet there are many people out there that have, at some early point in life, been convicted of a (non violent)felony, paid their debt to society and have lived good, honest, law abiding lives for a lustrum, decade, or even a score.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    Released inmate may be on the warpath

    Authorities said a recently released Florida prison inmate who may be intent on harming correction officers at the prison where he was held is being sought after he did not register with probation officers in St. Johns County.
    Investigators learned Jones, who was last seen in St. Johns County, left there for Jacksonville and possibly to Tennessee to acquire firearms and was planning to return to the prison in Perry, possibly to harm particular corrections officers, according to the Sheriff's Office.

    Jones' criminal history includes convictions for violent crimes involving weapons. The crimes occurred primarily in Polk County and other states, authorities said.
    This sounds exactly like the kind of guy you want to release so he can walk the streets. It's the mishandling of people like this that causes guns to get such a bad name. This is not the fault of the corrections officers, police, or even judges on the local level, though; they can only do so much. The mindless drug policy is decided on a national level in Washington. This guy is running around loose because we have to lock up potheads.

  6. #15

    It is always difficult

    to understand intent in typewritten words. That is why I tried to make it clear that the current rate of recividity (sp?) gives no confidence that this (rehabilitation and trying to return to being a responsible citizen) is actually being done.

    Now, while I fully favor the truth of the old statement about giving up liberty for TEMPORARY safety, I am also against known violent offenders being allowed unlimited access to weapons in a day when this is so widespread that it cannot be considered a short-term state of affairs. Unfortunately, this is also part of my view on terrorism. I know that thought is unpopular among many on this board but think about that qualification, "temporary." I don't see this situation as temporary, instead I think violence and terrorism is irrevocably part of the future. Without watching sales, reasonably structured profiling, the use of technology for some form(s) of monitoring and some extraordinary powers for intelligence/enforcement agencies, we are going to watch the toll mount to a level we cannot comprehend. It isn't just property, it's peoples lives.

    There are all kinds of scenarios we can play games with, some are humorous like in "Guarding Tess" when a SS agent shoots off a prisoner's toe to find where a kidnap victim is hidden. Some are dramatic like we often see Jack doing in "24." It's funny or reasonable until you realize you are laughing at or agreeing with a portrayal of torture and suspension of due process. Would you kill, maim or torture someone who had your child hidden in a hole in the ground with limited air? Think hard about your answer. Remember those pictures of the people killed and injured in the WTC. How angry were you? What if you could have shot a guy's ear off to have stopped it, would you have done so? If waterboarding would have given the names of the 19 attackers 4 hours before the planes were boarding, would you think it was a reasonable interrogation tool?

    RKBA is going to be very important, maybe even critical, to our safety and survival but all things evolve in the details. Remember that in those days, many businessmen owned cannons, they did not envision a difference between military and personal weapons. Yet most of us agree that an individual should not be allowed a crew-served weapon. Evolution.

    sigh...here we go...
    Last edited by ecocks; 01-04-2008 at 11:52 AM.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  7. #16
    You give some pretty compelling utilitarian arguments for restrictions on the 2nd amendment. The important question is, how do you want to do that? There are two ways to legally amend the constitution, and I hope that those methods are in the minds of people who want to limit 2A. Simple legislation and executive decisions are not legal ways to go about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by ecocks View Post
    to understand intent in typewritten words. That is why I tried to make it clear that the current rate of recividity (sp?) gives no confidence that this (rehabilitation and trying to return to being a responsible citizen) is actually being done.

    Now, while I fully favor the truth of the old statement about giving up liberty for TEMPORARY safety, I am also against known violent offenders being allowed unlimited access to weapons in a day when this is so widespread that it cannot be considered a short-term state of affairs. Unfortunately, this is also part of my view on terrorism. I know that thought is unpopular among many on this board but think about that qualification, "temporary." I don't see this situation as temporary, instead I think violence and terrorism is irrevocably part of the future. Without watching sales, reasonably structured profiling, the use of technology for some form(s) of monitoring and some extraordinary powers for intelligence/enforcement agencies, we are going to watch the toll mount to a level we cannot comprehend. It isn't just property, it's peoples lives.

    There are all kinds of scenarios we can play games with, some are humorous like in "Guarding Tess" when a SS agent shoots off a prisoner's toe to find where a kidnap victim is hidden. Some are dramatic like we often see Jack doing in "24." It's funny or reasonable until you realize you are laughing at or agreeing with a portrayal of torture and suspension of due process. Would you kill, maim or torture someone who had your child hidden in a hole in the ground with limited air? Think hard about your answer. Remember those pictures of the people killed and injured in the WTC. How angry were you? What if you could have shot a guy's ear off to have stopped it, would you have done so? If waterboarding would have given the names of the 19 attackers 4 hours before the planes were boarding, would you think it was a reasonable interrogation tool?

    RKBA is going to be very important, maybe even critical, to our safety and survival but all things evolve in the details. Remember that in those days, many businessmen owned cannons, they did not envision a difference between military and personal weapons. Yet most of us agree that an individual should not be allowed a crew-served weapon. Evolution.

    sigh...here we go...
    Truth is mighty and will prevail. There is nothing the matter with this, except that it ain't so.

    -Mark Twain

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